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references on pointers

P: n/a
Hi,

I'm looking for some good references on pointers.

Has anyone read any of these books:

1) C++ Pointers and Dynamic Memory Management
by Michael C. Daconta

2) Memory as a Programming Concept in C and C++
by Frantisek Franek

If so, which one would you recommend? Or are there
maybe any other good books dealing with that topic?

Thank you.

Chris
Jul 23 '05 #1
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P: n/a

"Christian Christmann" <pl*****@yahoo.de> wrote in message
news:42***********************@newsread2.arcor-online.net...
Hi,

I'm looking for some good references on pointers.

Has anyone read any of these books:

1) C++ Pointers and Dynamic Memory Management
by Michael C. Daconta

2) Memory as a Programming Concept in C and C++
by Frantisek Franek

If so, which one would you recommend? Or are there
maybe any other good books dealing with that topic?

Thank you.

Chris


A really good book that does a wonderful job of explaining pointers is
"Expert C Programming", subtitiled "Deep C Secrets", by Peter Van Der
Linden. Check amazon.com for ISBN 0131774298.
Jul 23 '05 #2

P: n/a


Christian Christmann wrote:
Hi,

I'm looking for some good references on pointers.

Has anyone read any of these books:

1) C++ Pointers and Dynamic Memory Management
by Michael C. Daconta

2) Memory as a Programming Concept in C and C++
by Frantisek Franek

If so, which one would you recommend? Or are there
maybe any other good books dealing with that topic?


Without reading more than the title, I know the second
book is bad. C++ has different rules for pointers. Even
NULL is defined differently!

Furthermore, pointers are not nearly as important nowadays
as they used to be. For many purposes, pointers are kept
inside standard classes. E.g. char* is now kept as a
detail in std::string. Learn std::string first, and
worry about char* later. Dynamic memory management too
is mostly history. std::string has a .resize() method.
std::list<> and std::vector<> have .resize() methods too.
Most people don't need to know how they're implemented,
just how to call them.

Try e.g. Accelerated C++ as an introduction in modern
C++ (for people who know a bit about C or old C++ or
even Java)

Regards,
Michiel Salters

Jul 23 '05 #3

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