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charting

P: n/a
Hello

Before I embark on a google journey, I thought it would be good to get a
starting hints here first.
What am up against? I need to be able to chart a given sequence and be
able to zoom in/out, side scroll, auto scale, compare with other
sequences on the same horizontal scale, custom place chart objects, etc

Any ideas on libs in C++ or somthing

thanks
Jul 23 '05 #1
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8 Replies


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On Sun, 05 Jun 2005 04:48:06 -0700, Baloff <vd****@bi.edu.gr> wrote:
Hello

Before I embark on a google journey, I thought it would be good to get a
starting hints here first.
What am up against? I need to be able to chart a given sequence and be
able to zoom in/out, side scroll, auto scale, compare with other
sequences on the same horizontal scale, custom place chart objects, etc

Any ideas on libs in C++ or somthing

thanks


This sounds like it is heavily GUI-centric ... most likely there is no
standard C++ library which will do what you want because the standard
C++ language doesn't concern itself with GUI's, operating systems,
etc.

If you can abstract the "chart object", and the "sequence object",
maybe we can help?

--
Bob Hairgrove
No**********@Home.com
Jul 23 '05 #2

P: n/a
Baloff wrote:
Before I embark on a google journey, I thought it would be good to get a
starting hints here first.
What am up against? I need to be able to chart a given sequence and be
able to zoom in/out, side scroll, auto scale, compare with other
sequences on the same horizontal scale, custom place chart objects, etc


I googled. This topic is a pain in the nuts for C++. The best package I ever
auditioned, after 15 years of researching this very topic, was BLT with the
Python wrapper. That forsakes C++ (which you don't need), but I could not
install BLT on Win32 the last time I tried.

From there, here are the various problems:

- GNUplot - static output, not interactive. Good for books

- MacSym - payware?

- Mathematica - pay pay payware

- wxPlot - has bugs but scrolls great; a rewrite might
be underay

- Qt - has a hand-rolled solution that's inexcusable for
what's a very fine library

- Cern Root - billions of flexibilities, none of which lead
to a polished user experience

- LabWindows - payware

Good luck - report here if you find anything. Googling for everything in my
list at once might get you a survey.

--
Phlip
http://www.c2.com/cgi/wiki?ZeekLand
Jul 23 '05 #3

P: n/a
Bob Hairgrove wrote:
This sounds like it is heavily GUI-centric ... most likely there is no
standard C++ library which will do what you want because the standard
C++ language doesn't concern itself with GUI's, operating systems,
etc.


We can squeeze the question "what general C++ library does X?" into
topicality if it's a question we wouldn't trust other newsgroups to. If
someone redirects to an MS newsgroup and GNU happened to be better wouldn't
you feel guilty?

--
Phlip
http://www.c2.com/cgi/wiki?ZeekLand
Jul 23 '05 #4

P: n/a
On Sun, 05 Jun 2005 04:50:21 GMT, "Phlip" <ph*******@yahoo.com> wrote:
Bob Hairgrove wrote:
This sounds like it is heavily GUI-centric ... most likely there is no
standard C++ library which will do what you want because the standard
C++ language doesn't concern itself with GUI's, operating systems,
etc.


We can squeeze the question "what general C++ library does X?" into
topicality if it's a question we wouldn't trust other newsgroups to. If
someone redirects to an MS newsgroup and GNU happened to be better wouldn't
you feel guilty?


Why should I? I didn't redirect the OP anywhere.

--
Bob Hairgrove
No**********@Home.com
Jul 23 '05 #5

P: n/a
ben
In addtion, matlab interoperating with C/C++.

ben
Jul 23 '05 #6

P: n/a
ben wrote:
In addtion, matlab interoperating with C/C++.

ben


Matlab interoperating with C++ is a royal pain in the ass. Trust me,
I've been beating my brains out over the last four months trying to get
a system (running C++ with MATLAB R13) ported to R14.
Jul 23 '05 #7

P: n/a
Hello,

Check out Gigasoft ProEssentials. It sounds like you're needing serious
charting and ProEssentials goes beyond generic charting.

www.gigasoft.com

best regards,

Robert Dede
Gigasoft, Inc.

"Baloff" <vd****@bi.edu.gr> wrote in message
news:42**********@news.iprimus.com.au...
Hello

Before I embark on a google journey, I thought it would be good to get a
starting hints here first.
What am up against? I need to be able to chart a given sequence and be
able to zoom in/out, side scroll, auto scale, compare with other sequences
on the same horizontal scale, custom place chart objects, etc

Any ideas on libs in C++ or somthing

thanks

Jul 23 '05 #8

P: n/a
Phlip wrote:
Baloff wrote:
Before I embark on a google journey, I thought it would be good to
get a starting hints here first.
What am up against? I need to be able to chart a given sequence and
be able to zoom in/out, side scroll, auto scale, compare with other
sequences on the same horizontal scale, custom place chart objects,
etc
I googled. This topic is a pain in the nuts for C++.


I won't dispute that.
The best package
I ever auditioned, after 15 years of researching this very topic, was
BLT with the Python wrapper. That forsakes C++ (which you don't
need), but I could not install BLT on Win32 the last time I tried.

From there, here are the various problems:

- GNUplot - static output, not interactive. Good for books


<shameless Gnuplot plug>

1) It's Gnuplot, not GNUplot (nothing whatsoever to do with the GNU project, is not GPL'd, although it is open source).
See <http://www.gnuplot.info/> for more detail.

2) Not sure what "static output" means.

3) It is certainly (as of the last few releases) interactive, featuring zooming, (auto)scaling, rotation (of 3D plots),
multi-plotting of series on common axis, etc. It has a /very/ extensive set of interactive commands for labelling, keys,
colours, data transformation, you name it (doesn't do scrolling, though, IIRC).

4) The nearest it has to a "programmatic interface" is that it accepts piped commands, if your OS supports pipes. This
can be pretty powerful - eg. it is deployed in this way as the plotting interface for the Octave numerical package
<http://www.octave.org/>.

5) It is capable of output to a range of "terminals" (read: graphics devices/image formats).

6) It is in very wide use (particularly in scientific circles), supported on many platforms, is actively developed and
has a large and responsive user community; support (via the newsgroup) is excellent.

I too have tried a range of free/non-free plotting alternatives, but keep coming back to Gnuplot.

</shameless Gnuplot plug>

--
Lionel B
Jul 23 '05 #9

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