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compiler

P: n/a
Hello,
Whitch one should I buy? Whitch one is good/better? What do you think? I
want to produce software and then sell it (and that's why I have to buy
one).
(Ps. I don't have much money ;) )

compiler_seeker
Jul 23 '05 #1
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7 Replies


P: n/a
poszukiwacz_kompilatora wrote:

Hello,
Whitch one should I buy? Whitch one is good/better? What do you think? I
want to produce software and then sell it (and that's why I have to buy
one).


You don't need to buy a compiler for selling software.
There are good free compilers available.

http://ma.rtij.nl/acllc-c++.FAQ.html
Section 5.1

--
Karl Heinz Buchegger
kb******@gascad.at
Jul 23 '05 #2

P: n/a
> You don't need to buy a compiler for selling software.
There are good free compilers available.

http://ma.rtij.nl/acllc-c++.FAQ.html
Section 5.1


But aren't they under GPL license (GNU) witch restricts the usage?

poszukiwacz_kompilatora
Jul 23 '05 #3

P: n/a
poszukiwacz_kompilatora bez spamu wrote:
You don't need to buy a compiler for selling software.
There are good free compilers available.

http://ma.rtij.nl/acllc-c++.FAQ.html
Section 5.1
But aren't they under GPL license (GNU)


No, not all of them.
witch restricts the usage?


Well, the GPL has been described as a "viral license", but I don't
believe it infects the code it compiles ;)

Seriously, unless you intended to use the *source code* of a GPLed
compiler in your code (you didn't, did you...) you'd not have a
problem.

--
Lionel B

Jul 23 '05 #4

P: n/a
poszukiwacz_kompilatora bez spamu wrote:
You don't need to buy a compiler for selling software.
There are good free compilers available.

http://ma.rtij.nl/acllc-c++.FAQ.html
Section 5.1
But aren't they under GPL license (GNU)


Yes.
witch restricts the usage?
No. The compiler license only applies to your use of the compiler, and
your right to create derivative works of the compiler (eg, to extend or
change it).

It has no bearing on the code you write, or the object code the
compiler generates from it. You can pick any license you want for your
own software.

poszukiwacz_kompilatora


Jul 23 '05 #5

P: n/a
> Seriously, unless you intended to use the *source code* of a GPLed
compiler in your code (you didn't, did you...) you'd not have a
problem.


But as far as (e.g.) Dev-cpp is concerned they wrie:
"oftware--to make sure the software is free for all its users. This
General Public License applies to most of the Free Software
Foundation's software and to any other program whose authors commit to
using it."

So... my applications (I will make) will also be GPL'ed, am I right?

And what's about the others?
Jul 23 '05 #6

P: n/a
> So... my applications (I will make) will also be GPL'ed, am I right?

No. In fact, if whatever programs you're using is released under the
GPL, they are not allowed to make you release your software under the
GPL. GCC and Dev-CPP are both released under the GPL, so you can create
anything with them and be good. (You might want to be careful with
GCC's runtime libraries; I don't know what the situation is there.)

You only have to GPL your code if you use or link to GPL'd code, and
then release your software. The disclaimer you posted:
Software--to make sure the software is free for all its users. This
General Public License applies to most of the Free Software
Foundation's software and to any other program whose authors commit to using it.


refers to extending software, not just writing your own.

Jul 23 '05 #7

P: n/a
> No. In fact, if whatever programs you're using is released under the
GPL, they are not allowed to make you release your software under the
GPL. GCC and Dev-CPP are both released under the GPL, so you can create anything with them and be good. (You might want to be careful with
GCC's runtime libraries; I don't know what the situation is there.)


Perhaps I could be a little more clear.

The GPL doesn't cover the *products* producted by merely using
software. In fact, you do not need to agree to the GPL in order to just
use the software. The only time the GPL comes into play is if you wish
to distribute a derivative work based off of the GPL.

As far as Dev-CPP and GCC are concerned, you are not producing a
derivative work as you are not incorporating any part of them into your
project. The only thing that you have to be aware of is tha GCC by
default uses glibc, which is LGPL. The LGPL is not viral* like the GPL,
so you may still release your code under whatever license you please.
You just have to offer the source for glibc to anyone who requests it.
(Read the LGPL for what you have to do.)

*I know a lot of GPL advocates don't like this term, but I'm gonna
stick with it now since I can't think of anything better. I don't mean
"viral" in a bad sense however; just try to keep the normal reaction of
"virus, bad!" down.

Jul 23 '05 #8

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