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C++ program to perform extensive data IO task, 160MB/s.

P: n/a
My task is to write a C++ program to satisfy these requirements.

I have an embedded board which is supposed to output 2 channels of
10-bit, 40MHz datastreams. My board has an ARM cpu and an USB2
port. The data is stored in the PC in plain text.

Can C++ and USB2 port satisfy my requirement?

Thanks.

Jul 23 '05 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
Sea Squid wrote:
My task is to write a C++ program to satisfy these requirements.

I have an embedded board which is supposed to output 2 channels of
10-bit, 40MHz datastreams. My board has an ARM cpu and an USB2
port. The data is stored in the PC in plain text.

Can C++ and USB2 port satisfy my requirement?


Well, C++ doesn't have something like a maximum data rate. It entirely
depends on the system and the optimization capabilities of your compiler.
IIRC, USB2 has a theoretical maximum data rate of 480Mbit/s, which is the
same as 60MBytes/s. I don't know which rate can be realistically achieved,
but one single USB2 port won't be enough for all your data.
Anyway, you should rather ask this in a newsgroup about embedded systems,
since it doesn't have anything to do with the C++ language (the topic of
this newsgroup).

Jul 23 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Wed, 16 Mar 2005 11:42:24 +0100, Rolf Magnus <ra******@t-online.de>
wrote:
Sea Squid wrote:
My task is to write a C++ program to satisfy these requirements.

I have an embedded board which is supposed to output 2 channels of
10-bit, 40MHz datastreams. My board has an ARM cpu and an USB2
port. The data is stored in the PC in plain text.

Can C++ and USB2 port satisfy my requirement?


Well, C++ doesn't have something like a maximum data rate. It entirely
depends on the system and the optimization capabilities of your compiler.
IIRC, USB2 has a theoretical maximum data rate of 480Mbit/s, which is the
same as 60MBytes/s. I don't know which rate can be realistically
achieved,
but one single USB2 port won't be enough for all your data.
Anyway, you should rather ask this in a newsgroup about embedded systems,
since it doesn't have anything to do with the C++ language (the topic of
this newsgroup).


little remark: besides the speed of your USB2 port you must have
suitable speed of your whole system! (if your data are on the
hard drive it has to read with such a speed)
Jul 23 '05 #3

P: n/a
Thank you Taras and Rolf.

I am looking into logic analyzers which might solve my problem. Your replies
has cleared my doubts.

"Taras" <ka*@voliacable.com> wrote in message
news:op**************@campus.voliacable.com...
On Wed, 16 Mar 2005 11:42:24 +0100, Rolf Magnus <ra******@t-online.de>
wrote:
Sea Squid wrote:
My task is to write a C++ program to satisfy these requirements.

I have an embedded board which is supposed to output 2 channels of
10-bit, 40MHz datastreams. My board has an ARM cpu and an USB2
port. The data is stored in the PC in plain text.

Can C++ and USB2 port satisfy my requirement?


Well, C++ doesn't have something like a maximum data rate. It entirely
depends on the system and the optimization capabilities of your compiler. IIRC, USB2 has a theoretical maximum data rate of 480Mbit/s, which is the same as 60MBytes/s. I don't know which rate can be realistically
achieved,
but one single USB2 port won't be enough for all your data.
Anyway, you should rather ask this in a newsgroup about embedded systems, since it doesn't have anything to do with the C++ language (the topic of
this newsgroup).


little remark: besides the speed of your USB2 port you must have
suitable speed of your whole system! (if your data are on the
hard drive it has to read with such a speed)

Jul 23 '05 #4

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