By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
446,194 Members | 847 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 446,194 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

why .hpp?

P: n/a
For c++ header files which is better .h or .hpp extension?. if .hpp why?

Abhishek
Jul 23 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
6 Replies


P: n/a
A. Saksena wrote:
For c++ header files which is better .h or .hpp extension?. if .hpp why?


..hpp is better if the header is not for use with any C module. If it is
possible to use it with a C module, many keep the same header and name it
..h and make sure that it compiles if included in a C translation unit.

However, if your header is for internal consumption only and your project
is pure C++, there is no difference, and I prefer .h because the editors
are usually not very good at supporting different extensions without some
additional configuring.

V
Jul 23 '05 #2

P: n/a
A. Saksena wrote:
For c++ header files which is better .h or .hpp extension?. if .hpp why?


Conceptually:

..h is for C-compatible headers

..hpp is for C++-compatible headers

In actuality:

..h is for C & C++ headers

..hpp is for some holdouts, old Borland users, and isn't supported by some
compilers all that well

{} is for C++ standard library headers

Also, there is really no consensus for the .h/.hpp as it relates to language,
and as a matter of fact, the lack of consensus is the reason that we have to
live with the complete abortion of a standard dealing with extensionless
standard headers, probably one of the _dumbest_ things the committee did
(wasn't unanimous though). Just goes to show that committees can be just as
dumb as anyone else, but I digress (with prejudice!).
Jul 23 '05 #3

P: n/a
A. Saksena wrote:
For c++ header files which is better .h or .hpp extension?. if .hpp why?

Abhishek


I use ".hpp" for C++ headers and ".h" for C language headers.
The ".hpp" reminds me that the file contains statements for
the C++ language which are not valid for the C language, such
as "class" declarations.

I've had projects which use both languages. One does not want
to include a C++ header into a C language source file.

As to which is better, that is an opinion best determined
by you.

--
Thomas Matthews

C++ newsgroup welcome message:
http://www.slack.net/~shiva/welcome.txt
C++ Faq: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite
C Faq: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/c-faq/top.html
alt.comp.lang.learn.c-c++ faq:
http://www.comeaucomputing.com/learn/faq/
Other sites:
http://www.josuttis.com -- C++ STL Library book
http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl -- Standard Template Library

Jul 23 '05 #4

P: n/a

"Ron Natalie" <ro*@sensor.com> wrote in message
news:42***********************@news.newshosting.co m...
Thomas Matthews wrote:
I don't need the extension to remind me what language I'm programming
in. The different extension for the .c and .cpp files is for the
benefit of the compiler so it can tell easily what language the TU
is in.


Generally, to something like this, I would say GFY and leave it be, but I
thought I should throw in there that emacs has different font lock modes for
different types of files -- c and c++ syntaxes are colored differently. In
this case, it is useful not to have to tell emacs what file is what. Emacs
assumes .h is a c-language file, whereas .hpp is a c++-language file, so,
for the same reason that you stated for .c and .cpp files, it is also useful
to have .h and .hpp files.

For me. You can do what you want. I can always do a massive renaming binge
on your files if I ever have to look at them.

- JFA1
Jul 23 '05 #5

P: n/a
James Aguilar wrote:
Ron Natalie wrote:
Thomas Matthews wrote:
I don't need the extension
to remind me what language I'm programming in.
The different extension for the .c and .cpp files
is for the benefit of the compiler
so it can tell easily what language the TU is in.
Generally, to something like this, I would say GFY and leave it be
but I thought [that] I should throw in there that
emacs has different font lock modes for different types of files
-- c and c++ syntaxes are colored differently.
In this case, it is useful not to have to tell emacs what file is what.
Emacs assumes .h is a c-language file, whereas .hpp is a c++-language file so,
for the same reason that you stated for .c and .cpp files,
it is also useful to have .h and .hpp files. For me. You can do what you want.
I can always do a massive renaming binge on your files
if I ever have to look at them.
I use vim (Vi IMproved).
cat /usr/share/vim/vim61/filetype.vim

" C++
if has("fname_case")
au BufNewFile,BufRead *.cxx,*.c++,*.C,*.H,*.hh,*.hxx,*.hpp,\
*.moc,*.tcc,*.inl setf cpp
else
au BufNewFile,BufRead *.cxx,*.c++,*.hh,*.hxx,*.hpp,\
*.moc,*.tcc,*.inl setf cpp
endif
" .h files can be C or C++, set c_syntax_for_h if you want C
au BufNewFile,BufRead *.h
\ if exists("c_syntax_for_h") | setf c | else | \
setf cpp | endif

I suppose that I could add suffixes for [header] files
that are intended to be included in C or C++ source files.
I think that the *.tcc extensions are for C++ template files.
I don't know what the *.moc and *.inl extensions are for.
Jul 23 '05 #6

P: n/a
"James Aguilar" <jf**@cec.wustl.edu> wrote in message
news:cu**********@newsreader.wustl.edu...

"Ron Natalie" <ro*@sensor.com> wrote in message
news:42***********************@news.newshosting.co m...
Thomas Matthews wrote:
I don't need the extension to remind me what language I'm programming
in. The different extension for the .c and .cpp files is for the
benefit of the compiler so it can tell easily what language the TU
is in.
Generally, to something like this, I would say GFY and leave it be, but I
thought I should throw in there that emacs has different font lock modes

for different types of files -- c and c++ syntaxes are colored differently. In this case, it is useful not to have to tell emacs what file is what. Emacs assumes .h is a c-language file, whereas .hpp is a c++-language file, so,
for the same reason that you stated for .c and .cpp files, it is also useful to have .h and .hpp files.

For me. You can do what you want. I can always do a massive renaming binge on your files if I ever have to look at them.

- JFA1

I am sure it can be changed in emacs, and quite easily. Vim also.

I generally use .h for C and C++ headers that I write. All implementation
(IDE)-
created header files I just leave as they are (.h for MS, .hpp for Borland).

Nathaniel L. Walker
Jul 23 '05 #7

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.