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meanings of dialets or implementation of a programming language

P: n/a
I always heard dialet of programming language. Or implementation of a
programming language. What does it really mean? C++ is standardized
already, does it mean it doesn't have any dialets? But I have heard
Borland C++ is the implementation of C++ programming language. What
does it mean?

please advise. thanks!!
Jul 22 '05 #1
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P: n/a
Matt posted:
I always heard dialet of programming language. Or implementation of a
programming language. What does it really mean? C++ is standardized
already, does it mean it doesn't have any dialets? But I have heard
Borland C++ is the implementation of C++ programming language. What
does it mean?

please advise. thanks!!

Just because we call them programming "languages" doesn't mean they've any
resemblance to real-life spoken languages!

Programming languages certainly don't have dialects.

You won't see:

for (;;) {}

and

fo' (;;) {}

There's a thing called the C++ Standard, which lays down the rules for how a
compiler deals with the code you write. If you write code that doesn't
violate anything in the C++ Standard, then you've got a Standard-compliant
code.
Now take C99, a programming language distinct from C++. If you write a
program in C99, have you written a program in a dialect of C++? No! We don't
use the word "dialect" in programming. Either the program is C++ Standard-
compliant or not. For instance, there's things that are legal in C99 that
are not legal in C++, like variable-size arrays. If you write a program that
defines a variable size array, then it will be a C99 Standard-compliant
program, and it won't be a C++ Standard-compliant program.

Now, it's possible to have code that is both C99-Standard compliant *and*
C++ Standard compliant. This perhaps is where you've got the notion of
"dialects", because conversely for instance *no* code will be both C++
Standard-compliant and Delphi Standard-compliant at the same time! So,
there's definitely a relationship between C++, C, C99, but I wouldn't use
the "term" dialects.

This particular newsgroup deals with C++ and as such the C++ Standard. We
don't talk about C nor C99 in here. In America, they say "football" in the
place of "American football", and in Brazil they say "nuts" instead of
"Brazillian nuts", well... here we say "Standard-compliant" instead of "C++
Standard-compliant".

So if we see the likes of:

int joke[number_entered_by_user];
then we're just going to say that it's non-Standard-compliant code.
Hope I've enlightened you a little!
-JKop
Jul 22 '05 #2

P: n/a
jr********@hotmail.com (Matt) wrote in news:ba8a039e.0409111144.60d62b46
@posting.google.com:
I always heard dialet of programming language. Or implementation of a
programming language. What does it really mean? C++ is standardized
already, does it mean it doesn't have any dialets? But I have heard
Borland C++ is the implementation of C++ programming language. What
does it mean?

please advise. thanks!!


The word is "dialect", not "dialet". Some implementations may not be
complete, or may deviate from the standard. These may be due to difficulty
of implementing it accurately, or misunderstanding the standard (possibly
due to ambiguity). Some implementations may provide extensions that are not
part of the standard, in for convenience in supporting a particular
platform.

All of these result is unique dialects.

Gregg
Jul 22 '05 #3

P: n/a

"JKop" <NU**@NULL.NULL> wrote in message
news:ZM******************@news.indigo.ie...
Matt posted:
I always heard dialet of programming language. Or implementation of a
programming language. What does it really mean? C++ is standardized
already, does it mean it doesn't have any dialets? But I have heard
Borland C++ is the implementation of C++ programming language. What
does it mean?

please advise. thanks!!

Just because we call them programming "languages" doesn't mean they've any
resemblance to real-life spoken languages!

Programming languages certainly don't have dialects.


C has the dialects K&R and ANSI. Dialect when used about programming
languages does not have the exact same meaning as when used about natural
languages.

john
Jul 22 '05 #4

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