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Character classification: novice question

P: n/a
I'm a little confused about this:

BOOL bTest=_istpunct(147);

In my ASCII chart, code 147 represents an open quote symbol, a "curled"
quote. But bTest is FALSE (0). It's false whether or not I have _UNICODE
defined. But isn't the character referred to by 147 a punctuation symbol?

Thanks for any insight,
Brad
Jul 22 '05 #1
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2 Replies


P: n/a
On Fri, 14 May 2004 01:24:36 GMT, "Internet Citizen"
<in*************@earthlink.net> wrote in comp.lang.c++:
I'm a little confused about this:

BOOL bTest=_istpunct(147);
Whatever _istpunct() is, is not a part of the C++ language or standard
library. It is some platform-specific extension supplied by your
compiler/operating system combination.
In my ASCII chart, code 147 represents an open quote symbol, a "curled"
Your ASCII chart is wrong. In fact, it is horribly broken. ASCII
(American Standard Code for Information Interchange) is a 7 bit code.
It defines values from 0 through 127 inclusive. It never has defined
147, and never will.
quote. But bTest is FALSE (0). It's false whether or not I have _UNICODE
defined. But isn't the character referred to by 147 a punctuation symbol?
_UNICODE is also something not defined by the C++ language. Big hint
here, almost everything that starts with a leading underscore is some
non-standard extension.
Thanks for any insight,
Brad


We can't help you here, the C++ language itself doesn't define the
things you are talking about. You need to ask in a platform specific
group. Judging from the headers on your post, some place like
news:comp.os.ms-windows.win32.programmer or one of Microsoft's support
groups in the news:microsoft.public.* family.

--
Jack Klein
Home: http://JK-Technology.Com
FAQs for
comp.lang.c http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
comp.lang.c++ http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/
alt.comp.lang.learn.c-c++
http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~a...FAQ-acllc.html
Jul 22 '05 #2

P: n/a
Thanks Jack, that does shed a lot of light.
Brad

"Jack Klein" <ja*******@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:5s********************************@4ax.com...
On Fri, 14 May 2004 01:24:36 GMT, "Internet Citizen"
<in*************@earthlink.net> wrote in comp.lang.c++:
I'm a little confused about this:

BOOL bTest=_istpunct(147);
Whatever _istpunct() is, is not a part of the C++ language or standard
library. It is some platform-specific extension supplied by your
compiler/operating system combination.
In my ASCII chart, code 147 represents an open quote symbol, a "curled"


Your ASCII chart is wrong. In fact, it is horribly broken. ASCII
(American Standard Code for Information Interchange) is a 7 bit code.
It defines values from 0 through 127 inclusive. It never has defined
147, and never will.
quote. But bTest is FALSE (0). It's false whether or not I have _UNICODE
defined. But isn't the character referred to by 147 a punctuation

symbol?
_UNICODE is also something not defined by the C++ language. Big hint
here, almost everything that starts with a leading underscore is some
non-standard extension.
Thanks for any insight,
Brad


We can't help you here, the C++ language itself doesn't define the
things you are talking about. You need to ask in a platform specific
group. Judging from the headers on your post, some place like
news:comp.os.ms-windows.win32.programmer or one of Microsoft's support
groups in the news:microsoft.public.* family.

--
Jack Klein
Home: http://JK-Technology.Com
FAQs for
comp.lang.c http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
comp.lang.c++ http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/
alt.comp.lang.learn.c-c++
http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~a...FAQ-acllc.html

Jul 22 '05 #3

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