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C++ / JNI memory leakage, help needed

P: n/a
Hi group!

I am using C++ and java with JNI to get some text in a RICHEDIT to my
java program. I do so by accessing a C++ method every second. It all
works fine except that it leaks memory every call I make to the C++
method.

Can anyone please help me with this problem? I am not sure wether the
leakage is in the C++ or java code. But i guess it's on the C++ side
since I'm kind of newbee there.

Is there perhaps a way to release the memory allocated for a LPTSTR in
C++?
Please take a look at the code below, it is the method i call every
second from java. I belive it is the LPTSTR that is leaking, since it
leaks more when the string gets larger.

<---------------
LPTSTR output;

JNIEXPORT jstring JNICALL
Java_JNIHandler_getDealerOutput(JNIEnv *env, jobject obj){

size = SendMessage(
(HWND) textarea, // handle to destination window
WM_GETTEXTLENGTH, // message to send
(WPARAM) 0,
(LPARAM) 0 ) +1;

output = new TCHAR[size];

SendMessage(textarea,
WM_GETTEXT,
size,
(LPARAM)(void*)output);

return env->NewStringUTF(dealerStr);

}
------------------>

I have tried to release the memory allocated when the NewStringUTF is
made with the JNI.h method env -> ReleaseStringUTFChars(str,
dealerStr) to no avail.
I hae also tried to use a try/finally block and in the finally set:
output= NULL; delete output; but there is no difference.

Cheers
Andreas
Jul 22 '05 #1
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32 Replies


P: n/a
John Harrison wrote:
"Sambucus" <an***************@aetdata.com> wrote in message
news:d3**************************@posting.google.c om...
Hi group!

I am using C++ and java with JNI to get some text in a RICHEDIT to my
java program. I do so by accessing a C++ method every second. It all
works fine except that it leaks memory every call I make to the C++
method.

Can anyone please help me with this problem? I am not sure wether the
leakage is in the C++ or java code. But i guess it's on the C++ side
since I'm kind of newbee there.

Is there perhaps a way to release the memory allocated for a LPTSTR in
C++?
Please take a look at the code below, it is the method i call every
second from java. I belive it is the LPTSTR that is leaking, since it
leaks more when the string gets larger.

<---------------
LPTSTR output;

JNIEXPORT jstring JNICALL
Java_JNIHandler_getDealerOutput(JNIEnv *env, jobject obj){

size = SendMessage(
(HWND) textarea, // handle to destination window
WM_GETTEXTLENGTH, // message to send
(WPARAM) 0,
(LPARAM) 0 ) +1;

output = new TCHAR[size];

SendMessage(textarea,
WM_GETTEXT,
size,
(LPARAM)(void*)output);

return env->NewStringUTF(dealerStr);

}
------------------>

I have tried to release the memory allocated when the NewStringUTF is
made with the JNI.h method env -> ReleaseStringUTFChars(str,
dealerStr) to no avail.
I hae also tried to use a try/finally block and in the finally set:
output= NULL; delete output; but there is no difference.

finally is not part of the C++ language

Try this

jstring res = env->NewStringUTF(dealerStr);
delete[] output;
return res;

I guess you are more of a Java programmer than a C++ programmer.

Another method would be to use a vector, then you wouldn't have to worry
about memory allocation.

size = SendMessage(textarea, WM_GETTEXTLENGTH, 0, 0);
std::vector<TCHAR> output(size + 1);
SendMessage(textarea, WM_GETTEXT, size, (LPARAM)(void*)&output[0]);
return env->NewStringUTF(&output[0]);

I'm a bit hazy on the Windows and JNI details but the bottom line is that if
you allocate memory with new[] then you have to free it with delete[], and
if you use a vector then you don't have to deallocate at all.


What John said, but consider using a std::basic_string<TCHAR> instead of
std::vector<TCHAR>. The basic string in C++ has more Java-like syntax,
e.g. the operator [ ] is range-checked, and concatenation can be done
with operator +.
Jul 22 '05 #2

P: n/a
Sambucus wrote:
output = new TCHAR[size];
This store is allocated but never freed. You need code to free it somewhere,
like:

delete [] output;
output = 0; // or = NULL if you prefer

return env->NewStringUTF(dealerStr);


Where does dealerStr come from ? Is this supposed to be 'output' ? I so then
you should probably make 'output' be a local variable of
Java_JNIHandler_getDealerOutput().

I think you also may have problems with passing the text from the window to
NewStringUTF(), that function requires bytes in a specific format that isn't
"just plain text" (though it'll work with plain text in many cases). I don't
think that'd be causing memory leaks, though, just "strange" Strings returned
from your native method (or possibly crashing the JVM ;-)

-- chris

Jul 22 '05 #3

P: n/a
>
What John said, but consider using a std::basic_string<TCHAR> instead of
std::vector<TCHAR>. The basic string in C++ has more Java-like syntax,
e.g. the operator [ ] is range-checked, and concatenation can be done
with operator +.


But the problem with std::basic_string is that you cannot get a writable
pointer from it. Therefore it's not suitable for passing to SendMessage(win,
WM_GETTEXT ...).

john
Jul 22 '05 #4

P: n/a

"Sambucus" <an***************@aetdata.com> wrote in message
news:d3**************************@posting.google.c om...
Hi group!

I am using C++ and java with JNI to get some text in a RICHEDIT to my
java program. I do so by accessing a C++ method every second. It all
works fine except that it leaks memory every call I make to the C++
method.

Can anyone please help me with this problem? I am not sure wether the
leakage is in the C++ or java code. But i guess it's on the C++ side
since I'm kind of newbee there.

Is there perhaps a way to release the memory allocated for a LPTSTR in
C++?
Please take a look at the code below, it is the method i call every
second from java. I belive it is the LPTSTR that is leaking, since it
leaks more when the string gets larger.

<---------------
LPTSTR output;

JNIEXPORT jstring JNICALL
Java_JNIHandler_getDealerOutput(JNIEnv *env, jobject obj){

size = SendMessage(
(HWND) textarea, // handle to destination window
WM_GETTEXTLENGTH, // message to send
(WPARAM) 0,
(LPARAM) 0 ) +1;

output = new TCHAR[size];

SendMessage(textarea,
WM_GETTEXT,
size,
(LPARAM)(void*)output);

return env->NewStringUTF(dealerStr);

}
------------------>

I have tried to release the memory allocated when the NewStringUTF is
made with the JNI.h method env -> ReleaseStringUTFChars(str,
dealerStr) to no avail.
I hae also tried to use a try/finally block and in the finally set:
output= NULL; delete output; but there is no difference.


finally is not part of the C++ language

Try this

jstring res = env->NewStringUTF(dealerStr);
delete[] output;
return res;

I guess you are more of a Java programmer than a C++ programmer.

Another method would be to use a vector, then you wouldn't have to worry
about memory allocation.

size = SendMessage(textarea, WM_GETTEXTLENGTH, 0, 0);
std::vector<TCHAR> output(size + 1);
SendMessage(textarea, WM_GETTEXT, size, (LPARAM)(void*)&output[0]);
return env->NewStringUTF(&output[0]);

I'm a bit hazy on the Windows and JNI details but the bottom line is that if
you allocate memory with new[] then you have to free it with delete[], and
if you use a vector then you don't have to deallocate at all.

john
Jul 22 '05 #5

P: n/a
John Harrison wrote:
What John said, but consider using a std::basic_string<TCHAR> instead of
std::vector<TCHAR>. The basic string in C++ has more Java-like syntax,
e.g. the operator [ ] is range-checked, and concatenation can be done
with operator +.

But the problem with std::basic_string is that you cannot get a writable
pointer from it. Therefore it's not suitable for passing to SendMessage(win,
WM_GETTEXT ...).


Thanks for clarifying, John. I don't know about SendMessage, and there
was no prototype in the OP. I see now that the string was given no
initializer, so it will need to be written.

Why use a vector, though, instead of an automatic array?
Jul 22 '05 #6

P: n/a
John Harrison wrote:
"Sambucus" <an***************@aetdata.com> wrote in message
news:d3**************************@posting.google.c om...
Hi group!

I am using C++ and java with JNI to get some text in a RICHEDIT to my
java program. I do so by accessing a C++ method every second. It all
works fine except that it leaks memory every call I make to the C++
method.

Can anyone please help me with this problem? I am not sure wether the
leakage is in the C++ or java code. But i guess it's on the C++ side
since I'm kind of newbee there.

Is there perhaps a way to release the memory allocated for a LPTSTR in
C++?
Please take a look at the code below, it is the method i call every
second from java. I belive it is the LPTSTR that is leaking, since it
leaks more when the string gets larger.

<---------------
LPTSTR output;

JNIEXPORT jstring JNICALL
Java_JNIHandler_getDealerOutput(JNIEnv *env, jobject obj){

size = SendMessage(
(HWND) textarea, // handle to destination window
WM_GETTEXTLENGTH, // message to send
(WPARAM) 0,
(LPARAM) 0 ) +1;

output = new TCHAR[size];

SendMessage(textarea,
WM_GETTEXT,
size,
(LPARAM)(void*)output);

return env->NewStringUTF(dealerStr);

}
------------------>

I have tried to release the memory allocated when the NewStringUTF is
made with the JNI.h method env -> ReleaseStringUTFChars(str,
dealerStr) to no avail.
I hae also tried to use a try/finally block and in the finally set:
output= NULL; delete output; but there is no difference.

finally is not part of the C++ language

Try this

jstring res = env->NewStringUTF(dealerStr);
delete[] output;
return res;

I guess you are more of a Java programmer than a C++ programmer.

Another method would be to use a vector, then you wouldn't have to worry
about memory allocation.

size = SendMessage(textarea, WM_GETTEXTLENGTH, 0, 0);
std::vector<TCHAR> output(size + 1);
SendMessage(textarea, WM_GETTEXT, size, (LPARAM)(void*)&output[0]);
return env->NewStringUTF(&output[0]);

I'm a bit hazy on the Windows and JNI details but the bottom line is that if
you allocate memory with new[] then you have to free it with delete[], and
if you use a vector then you don't have to deallocate at all.


What John said, but consider using a std::basic_string<TCHAR> instead of
std::vector<TCHAR>. The basic string in C++ has more Java-like syntax,
e.g. the operator [ ] is range-checked, and concatenation can be done
with operator +.
Jul 22 '05 #7

P: n/a

"Jeff Schwab" <je******@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:Q4********************@comcast.com...
John Harrison wrote:
What John said, but consider using a std::basic_string<TCHAR> instead of
std::vector<TCHAR>. The basic string in C++ has more Java-like syntax,
e.g. the operator [ ] is range-checked, and concatenation can be done
with operator +.

But the problem with std::basic_string is that you cannot get a writable
pointer from it. Therefore it's not suitable for passing to SendMessage(win, WM_GETTEXT ...).


Thanks for clarifying, John. I don't know about SendMessage, and there
was no prototype in the OP. I see now that the string was given no
initializer, so it will need to be written.

Why use a vector, though, instead of an automatic array?


Because the size isn't known at compile time. Some compilers support arrays
whose size is not known until runtime but its not standard C++.

This is all Windows detail but

SendMessage(textarea, WM_GETTEXTLENGTH, ...

gets the length of text and

SendMessage(textarea, WM_GETTEXT, ...

gets the actual characters.

john
Jul 22 '05 #8

P: n/a
>
What John said, but consider using a std::basic_string<TCHAR> instead of
std::vector<TCHAR>. The basic string in C++ has more Java-like syntax,
e.g. the operator [ ] is range-checked, and concatenation can be done
with operator +.


But the problem with std::basic_string is that you cannot get a writable
pointer from it. Therefore it's not suitable for passing to SendMessage(win,
WM_GETTEXT ...).

john
Jul 22 '05 #9

P: n/a
John Harrison wrote:
What John said, but consider using a std::basic_string<TCHAR> instead of
std::vector<TCHAR>. The basic string in C++ has more Java-like syntax,
e.g. the operator [ ] is range-checked, and concatenation can be done
with operator +.

But the problem with std::basic_string is that you cannot get a writable
pointer from it. Therefore it's not suitable for passing to SendMessage(win,
WM_GETTEXT ...).


Thanks for clarifying, John. I don't know about SendMessage, and there
was no prototype in the OP. I see now that the string was given no
initializer, so it will need to be written.

Why use a vector, though, instead of an automatic array?
Jul 22 '05 #10

P: n/a

"Jeff Schwab" <je******@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:Q4********************@comcast.com...
John Harrison wrote:
What John said, but consider using a std::basic_string<TCHAR> instead of
std::vector<TCHAR>. The basic string in C++ has more Java-like syntax,
e.g. the operator [ ] is range-checked, and concatenation can be done
with operator +.

But the problem with std::basic_string is that you cannot get a writable
pointer from it. Therefore it's not suitable for passing to SendMessage(win, WM_GETTEXT ...).


Thanks for clarifying, John. I don't know about SendMessage, and there
was no prototype in the OP. I see now that the string was given no
initializer, so it will need to be written.

Why use a vector, though, instead of an automatic array?


Because the size isn't known at compile time. Some compilers support arrays
whose size is not known until runtime but its not standard C++.

This is all Windows detail but

SendMessage(textarea, WM_GETTEXTLENGTH, ...

gets the length of text and

SendMessage(textarea, WM_GETTEXT, ...

gets the actual characters.

john
Jul 22 '05 #11

P: n/a
Chris Uppal wrote:
Sambucus wrote:

output = new TCHAR[size];

This store is allocated but never freed. You need code to free it somewhere,
like:

delete [] output;
output = 0; // or = NULL if you prefer


This isn't java related but alwaise set your variables to NULL, since
some platforms could exist that NULL is not defined as 0x0.
Jul 22 '05 #12

P: n/a
Chris Uppal wrote:
Sambucus wrote:

output = new TCHAR[size];

This store is allocated but never freed. You need code to free it somewhere,
like:

delete [] output;
output = 0; // or = NULL if you prefer


This isn't java related but alwaise set your variables to NULL, since
some platforms could exist that NULL is not defined as 0x0.
Jul 22 '05 #13

P: n/a
On Sat, 03 Apr 2004 17:07:10 +0000, Yoyoma_2 wrote:
This isn't java related but alwaise set your variables to NULL, since
some platforms could exist that NULL is not defined as 0x0.


I'm sure I've seen someone else on this group before say "Always set your
variables to 0 rather than to NULL, some platforms may exist where NULL
isn't defined as 0".

James

Jul 22 '05 #14

P: n/a
On Sat, 03 Apr 2004 17:07:10 +0000, Yoyoma_2 wrote:
This isn't java related but alwaise set your variables to NULL, since
some platforms could exist that NULL is not defined as 0x0.


I'm sure I've seen someone else on this group before say "Always set your
variables to 0 rather than to NULL, some platforms may exist where NULL
isn't defined as 0".

James

Jul 22 '05 #15

P: n/a
James Gregory wrote:
On Sat, 03 Apr 2004 17:07:10 +0000, Yoyoma_2 wrote:

This isn't java related but alwaise set your variables to NULL, since
some platforms could exist that NULL is not defined as 0x0.

I'm sure I've seen someone else on this group before say "Always set your
variables to 0 rather than to NULL, some platforms may exist where NULL
isn't defined as 0".

James


And they were right.

Always use 0. The address represented by 0 is guaranteed in C++ to be
the "null" value, whatever bit pattern that happens to be.
Jul 22 '05 #16

P: n/a
James Gregory wrote:
On Sat, 03 Apr 2004 17:07:10 +0000, Yoyoma_2 wrote:

This isn't java related but alwaise set your variables to NULL, since
some platforms could exist that NULL is not defined as 0x0.

I'm sure I've seen someone else on this group before say "Always set your
variables to 0 rather than to NULL, some platforms may exist where NULL
isn't defined as 0".

James


And they were right.

Always use 0. The address represented by 0 is guaranteed in C++ to be
the "null" value, whatever bit pattern that happens to be.
Jul 22 '05 #17

P: n/a
James Gregory wrote:
On Sat, 03 Apr 2004 17:07:10 +0000, Yoyoma_2 wrote:

This isn't java related but alwaise set your variables to NULL, since
some platforms could exist that NULL is not defined as 0x0.

I'm sure I've seen someone else on this group before say "Always set your
variables to 0 rather than to NULL, some platforms may exist where NULL
isn't defined as 0".


Which group are you talking above (the list is pretty extensive).

If you alwaise test on NULL then you are fine. What happends if you
need to write to the 0x0 memory area in an albeit wierd platform. Using
the NULL definition will eliviate that. Its also good practice. To me
this is the same thing as doing sizeof( int ) instead of just putting
"4". Cross-platform issues. This is what i've been tought but i am not
professing it as necessarly right.

James

Jul 22 '05 #18

P: n/a
James Gregory wrote:
On Sat, 03 Apr 2004 17:07:10 +0000, Yoyoma_2 wrote:

This isn't java related but alwaise set your variables to NULL, since
some platforms could exist that NULL is not defined as 0x0.

I'm sure I've seen someone else on this group before say "Always set your
variables to 0 rather than to NULL, some platforms may exist where NULL
isn't defined as 0".


Which group are you talking above (the list is pretty extensive).

If you alwaise test on NULL then you are fine. What happends if you
need to write to the 0x0 memory area in an albeit wierd platform. Using
the NULL definition will eliviate that. Its also good practice. To me
this is the same thing as doing sizeof( int ) instead of just putting
"4". Cross-platform issues. This is what i've been tought but i am not
professing it as necessarly right.

James

Jul 22 '05 #19

P: n/a
John Harrison wrote:
"Sambucus" <an***************@aetdata.com> wrote in message
news:d3**************************@posting.google.c om...
Hi group!

I am using C++ and java with JNI to get some text in a RICHEDIT to my
java program. I do so by accessing a C++ method every second. It all
works fine except that it leaks memory every call I make to the C++
method.

Can anyone please help me with this problem? I am not sure wether the
leakage is in the C++ or java code. But i guess it's on the C++ side
since I'm kind of newbee there.

Is there perhaps a way to release the memory allocated for a LPTSTR in
C++?
Please take a look at the code below, it is the method i call every
second from java. I belive it is the LPTSTR that is leaking, since it
leaks more when the string gets larger.

<---------------
LPTSTR output;

JNIEXPORT jstring JNICALL
Java_JNIHandler_getDealerOutput(JNIEnv *env, jobject obj){

size = SendMessage(
(HWND) textarea, // handle to destination window
WM_GETTEXTLENGTH, // message to send
(WPARAM) 0,
(LPARAM) 0 ) +1;

output = new TCHAR[size];

SendMessage(textarea,
WM_GETTEXT,
size,
(LPARAM)(void*)output);

return env->NewStringUTF(dealerStr);

}
------------------>

I have tried to release the memory allocated when the NewStringUTF is
made with the JNI.h method env -> ReleaseStringUTFChars(str,
dealerStr) to no avail.
I hae also tried to use a try/finally block and in the finally set:
output= NULL; delete output; but there is no difference.

finally is not part of the C++ language

Try this

jstring res = env->NewStringUTF(dealerStr);
delete[] output;


It's been a while since I last used JNI, but I think that strings that
you create using NewStringUTF must be deleted (I don't remember the
syntax for this).

Check Sun's web site for more details on NewStringUTF...

JLR
Jul 22 '05 #20

P: n/a
John Harrison wrote:
"Sambucus" <an***************@aetdata.com> wrote in message
news:d3**************************@posting.google.c om...
Hi group!

I am using C++ and java with JNI to get some text in a RICHEDIT to my
java program. I do so by accessing a C++ method every second. It all
works fine except that it leaks memory every call I make to the C++
method.

Can anyone please help me with this problem? I am not sure wether the
leakage is in the C++ or java code. But i guess it's on the C++ side
since I'm kind of newbee there.

Is there perhaps a way to release the memory allocated for a LPTSTR in
C++?
Please take a look at the code below, it is the method i call every
second from java. I belive it is the LPTSTR that is leaking, since it
leaks more when the string gets larger.

<---------------
LPTSTR output;

JNIEXPORT jstring JNICALL
Java_JNIHandler_getDealerOutput(JNIEnv *env, jobject obj){

size = SendMessage(
(HWND) textarea, // handle to destination window
WM_GETTEXTLENGTH, // message to send
(WPARAM) 0,
(LPARAM) 0 ) +1;

output = new TCHAR[size];

SendMessage(textarea,
WM_GETTEXT,
size,
(LPARAM)(void*)output);

return env->NewStringUTF(dealerStr);

}
------------------>

I have tried to release the memory allocated when the NewStringUTF is
made with the JNI.h method env -> ReleaseStringUTFChars(str,
dealerStr) to no avail.
I hae also tried to use a try/finally block and in the finally set:
output= NULL; delete output; but there is no difference.

finally is not part of the C++ language

Try this

jstring res = env->NewStringUTF(dealerStr);
delete[] output;


It's been a while since I last used JNI, but I think that strings that
you create using NewStringUTF must be deleted (I don't remember the
syntax for this).

Check Sun's web site for more details on NewStringUTF...

JLR
Jul 22 '05 #21

P: n/a
Yoyoma_2 wrote:
James Gregory wrote:
[...]
If you alwaise test on NULL then you are fine. What happends if you
need to write to the 0x0 memory area in an albeit wierd platform.


You are wrong. The value 0 when used as a pointer has special defined
semantics in both C and C++. Check the standards for the details.

I'd write more except that:

(a) this is cross-posted into areas where nobody is even slightly interested in
the oddities of the C/C++ standards.

(b) it's a few years since I last attempted public pedantry on these topics, so
I'm a little rusty...

-- chris
Jul 22 '05 #22

P: n/a
Yoyoma_2 wrote:
James Gregory wrote:
[...]
If you alwaise test on NULL then you are fine. What happends if you
need to write to the 0x0 memory area in an albeit wierd platform.


You are wrong. The value 0 when used as a pointer has special defined
semantics in both C and C++. Check the standards for the details.

I'd write more except that:

(a) this is cross-posted into areas where nobody is even slightly interested in
the oddities of the C/C++ standards.

(b) it's a few years since I last attempted public pedantry on these topics, so
I'm a little rusty...

-- chris
Jul 22 '05 #23

P: n/a
James Gregory wrote:
On Sat, 03 Apr 2004 17:07:10 +0000, Yoyoma_2 wrote:

This isn't java related but alwaise set your variables to NULL, since
some platforms could exist that NULL is not defined as 0x0.

I'm sure I've seen someone else on this group before say "Always set your
variables to 0 rather than to NULL, some platforms may exist where NULL
isn't defined as 0".


NULL must be a constant expression equal to 0. There is absolutely no
difference between using NULL and 0.

4.10 Pointer conversions [conv.ptr]

1 A null pointer constant is an integral constant expression
(_expr.const_) rvalue of integer type that evaluates to zero.

18.1 Types [lib.support.types]

[...]

4 The macro NULL is an implementation-defined C++ null pointer constant
in this International Standard (_conv.ptr_).180)

-Kevin
--
My email address is valid, but changes periodically.
To contact me please use the address from a recent posting.
Jul 22 '05 #24

P: n/a
James Gregory wrote:
On Sat, 03 Apr 2004 17:07:10 +0000, Yoyoma_2 wrote:

This isn't java related but alwaise set your variables to NULL, since
some platforms could exist that NULL is not defined as 0x0.

I'm sure I've seen someone else on this group before say "Always set your
variables to 0 rather than to NULL, some platforms may exist where NULL
isn't defined as 0".


NULL must be a constant expression equal to 0. There is absolutely no
difference between using NULL and 0.

4.10 Pointer conversions [conv.ptr]

1 A null pointer constant is an integral constant expression
(_expr.const_) rvalue of integer type that evaluates to zero.

18.1 Types [lib.support.types]

[...]

4 The macro NULL is an implementation-defined C++ null pointer constant
in this International Standard (_conv.ptr_).180)

-Kevin
--
My email address is valid, but changes periodically.
To contact me please use the address from a recent posting.
Jul 22 '05 #25

P: n/a
>
finally is not part of the C++ language

Try this

jstring res = env->NewStringUTF(dealerStr);
delete[] output;
return res;

I guess you are more of a Java programmer than a C++ programmer.

Another method would be to use a vector, then you wouldn't have to worry
about memory allocation.

size = SendMessage(textarea, WM_GETTEXTLENGTH, 0, 0);
std::vector<TCHAR> output(size + 1);
SendMessage(textarea, WM_GETTEXT, size, (LPARAM)(void*)&output[0]);
return env->NewStringUTF(&output[0]);

I'm a bit hazy on the Windows and JNI details but the bottom line is that if
you allocate memory with new[] then you have to free it with delete[], and
if you use a vector then you don't have to deallocate at all.

john


You are certainly corect about me beeing a Java programer and not C++
;)
I tried the first approach and it worked fine, thank you very much
John!

However i had tried to use something like this:

return env->NewStringUTF(output);

}
__finally
{
output= NULL;
delete [] output;
size=NULL;

....and it did not work, i guess it has to do with the __finally not
beeing part of c++? but why don't I get compilation a error?

//Andreas
Jul 22 '05 #26

P: n/a
>
finally is not part of the C++ language

Try this

jstring res = env->NewStringUTF(dealerStr);
delete[] output;
return res;

I guess you are more of a Java programmer than a C++ programmer.

Another method would be to use a vector, then you wouldn't have to worry
about memory allocation.

size = SendMessage(textarea, WM_GETTEXTLENGTH, 0, 0);
std::vector<TCHAR> output(size + 1);
SendMessage(textarea, WM_GETTEXT, size, (LPARAM)(void*)&output[0]);
return env->NewStringUTF(&output[0]);

I'm a bit hazy on the Windows and JNI details but the bottom line is that if
you allocate memory with new[] then you have to free it with delete[], and
if you use a vector then you don't have to deallocate at all.

john


You are certainly corect about me beeing a Java programer and not C++
;)
I tried the first approach and it worked fine, thank you very much
John!

However i had tried to use something like this:

return env->NewStringUTF(output);

}
__finally
{
output= NULL;
delete [] output;
size=NULL;

....and it did not work, i guess it has to do with the __finally not
beeing part of c++? but why don't I get compilation a error?

//Andreas
Jul 22 '05 #27

P: n/a
> It's been a while since I last used JNI, but I think that strings that
you create using NewStringUTF must be deleted (I don't remember the
syntax for this).

Check Sun's web site for more details on NewStringUTF...

JLR


Well i stumbled on info regarding this appearantly by Sun undocumented
memory leakage in JNI when trying to solve my problem.

However this is only when you are sending a java String to the C dll.
In the C code you have to get a C string from the Java UTF chars...
then you must use "env -> ReleaseStringUTFChars(str,output)" to
release it
Jul 22 '05 #28

P: n/a
> It's been a while since I last used JNI, but I think that strings that
you create using NewStringUTF must be deleted (I don't remember the
syntax for this).

Check Sun's web site for more details on NewStringUTF...

JLR


Well i stumbled on info regarding this appearantly by Sun undocumented
memory leakage in JNI when trying to solve my problem.

However this is only when you are sending a java String to the C dll.
In the C code you have to get a C string from the Java UTF chars...
then you must use "env -> ReleaseStringUTFChars(str,output)" to
release it
Jul 22 '05 #29

P: n/a
lev
function c_str() returns const <CHAR_TYPE> *
"John Harrison" <jo*************@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:c4*************@ID-196037.news.uni-berlin.de...

What John said, but consider using a std::basic_string<TCHAR> instead of
std::vector<TCHAR>. The basic string in C++ has more Java-like syntax,
e.g. the operator [ ] is range-checked, and concatenation can be done
with operator +.
But the problem with std::basic_string is that you cannot get a writable
pointer from it. Therefore it's not suitable for passing to

SendMessage(win, WM_GETTEXT ...).

john

Jul 22 '05 #30

P: n/a
lev
function c_str() returns const <CHAR_TYPE> *
"John Harrison" <jo*************@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:c4*************@ID-196037.news.uni-berlin.de...

What John said, but consider using a std::basic_string<TCHAR> instead of
std::vector<TCHAR>. The basic string in C++ has more Java-like syntax,
e.g. the operator [ ] is range-checked, and concatenation can be done
with operator +.
But the problem with std::basic_string is that you cannot get a writable
pointer from it. Therefore it's not suitable for passing to

SendMessage(win, WM_GETTEXT ...).

john

Jul 22 '05 #31

P: n/a

"lev" <lt*********@brandsoft.com> wrote in message
news:1gZbc.182893$Cb.1698658@attbi_s51...
function c_str() returns const <CHAR_TYPE> *


which is not a *writable* pointer

john
Jul 22 '05 #32

P: n/a

"lev" <lt*********@brandsoft.com> wrote in message
news:1gZbc.182893$Cb.1698658@attbi_s51...
function c_str() returns const <CHAR_TYPE> *


which is not a *writable* pointer

john
Jul 22 '05 #33

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