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C99 Versus ANSI.

Hi All

What is C99 Standard is all about. is it portable, i mean i saw
-std=C99 option in GCC
but there is no such thing in VC++.?

which one is better ANSI C / C99?
can i know the major difference between C99 & ANSI C standards?

Sep 27 '06
83 11670
jmcgill wrote:
jacob navia wrote:
>>jmcgill wrote:
>>>jacob navia wrote:

I find linux and windows are quite a big part of
the workstation market.
Linux and Windows having what, exactly, to do with the C99 standard?

because you said:
It is portable among systems implementing the standard, if you can find
any.

I found two


Neither "windows" nor "linux" is a C99 compiler or runtime library, so I
really have no idea what you are trying to claim.
Excuse me, I misunderstood "system" as operating system.
Actually, it looks that you meant "compiler system". Well,
my answer stays, gcc implements C99 under unix, and under windows
there is intel compiler, lcc-win32 and Comeau, that actually
also runs under Unix.

That makes for more than two "compiler systems"

jacob
Sep 27 '06 #11
jacob navia wrote:
jmcgill wrote:
>jacob navia wrote:
>>jmcgill wrote:

jacob navia wrote:

I find linux and windows are quite a big part of
the workstation market.
Linux and Windows having what, exactly, to do with the C99 standard?

because you said:
It is portable among systems implementing the standard, if you can find
any.

I found two


Neither "windows" nor "linux" is a C99 compiler or runtime library, so I
really have no idea what you are trying to claim.

Excuse me, I misunderstood "system" as operating system.
Actually, it looks that you meant "compiler system". Well,
my answer stays, gcc implements C99 under unix, and under windows
there is intel compiler, lcc-win32 and Comeau, that actually
also runs under Unix.

That makes for more than two "compiler systems"
There are some important features of C99 that are not yet implemented by
GCC. Comeau does not have a runtime library, but Dinkumware+Come au
solves that problem. There is an IBM compiler that you do not mention,
which is said to be a complete C99 implementation.

If you are willing to consider GCC4.x as a C99 compiler despite its
limitations, then there is a long, long list of target platforms that
support it.

I suspected your messages were just an effort to be contrary.
Sep 27 '06 #12
jmcgill wrote:
>
I suspected your messages were just an effort to be contrary.
No, it is because hearthfield took
"if you can find them" as an ironic way of saying
"almost none exists"

I am aware that the refusal by microsoft of accepting
c99 is a BIG stumbling block, but nevertheless, there
are many compiler that support it.

jacob
Sep 27 '06 #13
jacob navia said:

<snip>
Actually, it looks that you meant "compiler system". Well,
my answer stays, gcc implements C99 under unix,
No, it doesn't. There is no fully C99-conforming version of gcc at present.
and under windows there is intel compiler,
Got a URL? All I could find on their site were C++ compilers.
lcc-win32
Given the maintainer's limited knowledge of C as evidenced in comp.lang.c, I
must say I entertain certain doubts about whether lcc-win32 is
C99-conforming in all respects.
and Comeau, that actually also runs under Unix.
Certainly true, but "it also supports many of the C99 features provided by
this new revised ISO Standard for C" - which indicates that it is not in
fact C99-conforming in all respects.
That makes for more than two "compiler systems"
No, it doesn't.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
Sep 27 '06 #14
jacob navia wrote:
there
are many compiler that support it.
's/many/a few/'; 's/support it/support it to varying degrees/'
Sep 27 '06 #15
Richard Heathfield wrote:
jacob navia said:
and under windows there is intel compiler,

Got a URL? All I could find on their site were C++ compilers.
The "Intel C++ Compiler" is a less than perfect name; ICC includes
separate C and C++ compilers. I don't know if it's a conforming
implementation, though; from their own site:

http://www.intel.com/support/perform.../cs-015003.htm
C Standard Conformance
The Intel® C++ Compilers provide some conformance to the ANSI/ISO
standard for C language compilation (ISO/IEC 9899:1999).

For more information on C conformance, refer to the User's Guide.

"Some conformance" ? (In fairness though, I don't know of any issues
icc may have that would make it nonconforming.)

Sep 27 '06 #16
Harald van Dijk wrote:
Richard Heathfield wrote:
>>jacob navia said:
>>>and under windows there is intel compiler,

Got a URL? All I could find on their site were C++ compilers.


The "Intel C++ Compiler" is a less than perfect name; ICC includes
separate C and C++ compilers. I don't know if it's a conforming
implementation, though; from their own site:

http://www.intel.com/support/perform.../cs-015003.htm
C Standard Conformance
The Intel® C++ Compilers provide some conformance to the ANSI/ISO
standard for C language compilation (ISO/IEC 9899:1999).

For more information on C conformance, refer to the User's Guide.

"Some conformance" ? (In fairness though, I don't know of any issues
icc may have that would make it nonconforming.)
It is business talk.

If you write

This is 100% conforming you are liable if there is the
slightest bug. If you write "some" conformance, you are
not.
Sep 27 '06 #17
Richard Heathfield wrote:
jacob navia said:

<snip>
>>Actually, it looks that you meant "compiler system". Well,
my answer stays, gcc implements C99 under unix,


No, it doesn't. There is no fully C99-conforming version of gcc at present.

>>and under windows there is intel compiler,


Got a URL? All I could find on their site were C++ compilers.

>>lcc-win32


Given the maintainer's limited knowledge of C as evidenced in comp.lang.c, I
must say I entertain certain doubts about whether lcc-win32 is
C99-conforming in all respects.
Given the history of pedantic remarks you use,
it is obvious that you can't refrain.

But if you want it, you are right.

I have "a limited knowledge of C". I am not "the GURU",
and I do make mistakes.

Other people, think that they have "unlimited knowledge
of C", they know everything.

I am not that kind of person.
Sep 27 '06 #18
jacob navia wrote:
Harald van Dijk wrote:
Richard Heathfield wrote:
>jacob navia said:

and under windows there is intel compiler,

Got a URL? All I could find on their site were C++ compilers.

The "Intel C++ Compiler" is a less than perfect name; ICC includes
separate C and C++ compilers. I don't know if it's a conforming
implementation, though; from their own site:

http://www.intel.com/support/perform.../cs-015003.htm
C Standard Conformance
The Intel® C++ Compilers provide some conformance to the ANSI/ISO
standard for C language compilation (ISO/IEC 9899:1999).

For more information on C conformance, refer to the User's Guide.

"Some conformance" ? (In fairness though, I don't know of any issues
icc may have that would make it nonconforming.)

It is business talk.

If you write

This is 100% conforming you are liable if there is the
slightest bug. If you write "some" conformance, you are
not.
Then explain to me why they do claim full C++ conformance at the very
same page for the Linux version, and only a single issue with C++
conformance for the Windows version.

Sep 27 '06 #19
jacob navia said:
Harald van Dijk wrote:
>>
<snip>
>>
"Some conformance" ? (In fairness though, I don't know of any issues
icc may have that would make it nonconforming.)

It is business talk.

If you write

This is 100% conforming you are liable if there is the
slightest bug. If you write "some" conformance, you are
not.
So what you seem to be saying is that even the people who wrote the compiler
are not convinced it's fully conforming. So why should anyone else be
convinced?

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
Sep 27 '06 #20

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