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code portability

My question is more generic, but it involves what I consider ANSI standard C
and portability.

I happen to be a system admin for multiple platforms and as such a lot of
the applications that my users request are a part of the OpenSource
community. Many if not most of those applications strongly require the
presence of the GNU compiling suite to work properly. My assumption is that
this is due to the author/s creating the applications with the GNU suite.
Many of the tools requested/required are GNU replacements for make,
configure, the loader, and lastly the C compiler itself. Where I'm going
with this is, has the OpenSource community as a whole committed itself to at
the very least encouraging its contributing members to conform to ANSI
standards of programming?

My concern is that as an admin I am sometimes compelled to port these
applications to multiple platforms running the same OS and as the user
community becomes more and more insistent on OpenSource applications will
gotcha's appear due to lack of portability in coding? I fully realize that
independent developers may or may not conform to standards, but again is it
at least encouraged?

11.32 of the FAQ seemed to at least outline the crux of what I am asking.
If I loaded up my home machine to the gills will all open source compiler
applications (gcc, imake, autoconfig, etc....) would my applications that I
compile and link and load conform?
Aug 1 '06
239 10352
en******@yahoo. com wrote:
Ian Collins wrote:
>It may not be popular in these parts, but I'd recommend you become
familiar with Test Driven Development as a way of enhancing the quality
of your code, both in design and implementation.

Kindly take your TDD proselytizing to a newsgroup where
it's topical.

That's a bit harsh.
Aug 9 '06 #141
en******@yahoo. com wrote:
Ian Collins wrote:
>>It may not be popular in these parts, but I'd recommend you become
familiar with Test Driven Development as a way of enhancing the quality
of your code, both in design and implementation.


Kindly take your TDD proselytizing to a newsgroup where
it's topical.
Typical knee-jerk reaction of an anonymous closed mind.

--
Ian Collins.
Aug 9 '06 #142
Ian Collins said:
en******@yahoo. com wrote:
>Ian Collins wrote:
>>>It may not be popular in these parts, but I'd recommend you become
familiar with Test Driven Development as a way of enhancing the quality
of your code, both in design and implementation.


Kindly take your TDD proselytizing to a newsgroup where
it's topical.
Typical knee-jerk reaction of an anonymous closed mind.
Then tally up another knee-jerk.

Phlip in c.p has made himself a right PITN by going on and on and on about
TDD. Please don't make the same mistake. The clc group is about the C
language, not about development strategies.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
Aug 9 '06 #143

jmcgill wrote:
en******@yahoo. com wrote:
Ian Collins wrote:
It may not be popular in these parts, but I'd recommend you become
familiar with Test Driven Development as a way of enhancing the quality
of your code, both in design and implementation.
Kindly take your TDD proselytizing to a newsgroup where
it's topical.


That's a bit harsh.
What's harsh about it? It's not topical in comp.lang.c.
The word proselytize has a bad rep with some people,
but I meant it in the literal sense of the word:

To induce someone to join one's own belief or doctrine

That seems like a fair and accurate description of the
comments I was responding to.

Aug 9 '06 #144

Ian Collins wrote:
en******@yahoo. com wrote:
Ian Collins wrote:
>It may not be popular in these parts, but I'd recommend you become
familiar with Test Driven Development as a way of enhancing the quality
of your code, both in design and implementation.

Kindly take your TDD proselytizing to a newsgroup where
it's topical.
Typical knee-jerk reaction of an anonymous closed mind.
Regardless of who is having a knee-jerk reaction or who has
a closed mind, the topic is still off-topic in comp.lang.c.

Aug 9 '06 #145
en******@yahoo. com wrote:
What's harsh about it? It's not topical in comp.lang.c.
I do a great deal of unit testing, functional testing, and acceptance
testing, and I'd like to know right now if I'm going to be abused by you
if the topic comes up with regard to programming and testing C.
In particular, I would like to know if you have some sort of moderator
authority, or if you are a major contributor to the forum, or any other
reason why I should refrain from putting you in my killfile at this time.
Aug 9 '06 #146
Richard Heathfield wrote:
Ian Collins said:

>>en******@yaho o.com wrote:
>>>Ian Collins wrote:
It may not be popular in these parts, but I'd recommend you become
familiar with Test Driven Development as a way of enhancing the quality
of your code, both in design and implementation.
Kindly take your TDD proselytizing to a newsgroup where
it's topical.

Typical knee-jerk reaction of an anonymous closed mind.


Then tally up another knee-jerk.

Phlip in c.p has made himself a right PITN by going on and on and on about
TDD. Please don't make the same mistake. The clc group is about the C
language, not about development strategies.
I certainly wouldn't want to be tarred with that brush!

--
Ian Collins.
Aug 9 '06 #147
Frederick Gotham wrote:

<snip>
Posting here, and over on comp.lang.c++, I am disconcerted by the ever-
frequent mention of business.
Many of us here earn our living writing software.
I would have thought that programmers would
be passionate about what they do, and that they would turn their back on
any prospect of perverting or dumbing down their programming to satisfy the
man in the suit.
What makes you think you have to pervert or dumb down your programming
just because you are working for a company? In over 20 years I've never
had to do that. I've never had to make code less efficient due to review
although when writing assembler I did once have to add in a *lot* more
commenting because the code was too convoluted to be followed without
massive commenting (it was required to be *extremely* efficient to meet
a real time requirement).
At the moment, it seems that I'm in the minority here, and
so be it. Thankfully though, twenty years down the road, still shy of
forty, I forsee myself as being a programmer of the highest proficiency. If
there's anything I can learn from these newsgroups, it's that I never want
to program as an occupation.
You seem to have developed a very strange idea of what it is to program
for a living. Matters of company style of layout are minor and many of
us have switched between style to conform. The important thing, and the
thing of interest IMHO, is solving the problems and the satisfaction of
seeing a customer successfully using your software.
In the future, I think I would take great satisfaction from teaching
programming, and concurrently working voluntarily on a Standard's
Committee.
Fine, but you still need to know about programming in the real world, be
it the open source community or commercially. The reality is that when
more than one person works on a project it is far easier to read if
everyone uses the same coding style and in the real world the majority
of complex pieces of software are worked on by multiple people.
--
Flash Gordon
Still sigless on this computer.
Aug 9 '06 #148
Flash Gordon said:
Frederick Gotham wrote:

<snip>
>Posting here, and over on comp.lang.c++, I am disconcerted by the ever-
frequent mention of business.

Many of us here earn our living writing software.
Many of us here use third-party libraries written in C. That does not mean
that third-party libraries are topical in clc.
I would have thought that programmers would
be passionate about what they do, and that they would turn their back on
any prospect of perverting or dumbing down their programming to satisfy
the man in the suit.

What makes you think you have to pervert or dumb down your programming
just because you are working for a company? In over 20 years I've never
had to do that.
I have. In one case, I was told to use a separate loop counter for each of
several (distinct) loops within a function:

int i, j, k;

for(i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
foo(p, i);
}

DoSomethingThat AffectsSomeElem entsIn(p);

for(j = 0; j < n; j++)
{
bar(p, j);
}

DoSomethingThat AffectsOtherEle mentsIn(p);

for(k = 0; k < n; k++)
{
bar(p, k);
}

because the team leader wasn't sure whether the loop counter went out of
scope after the termination of the loop in which it was used! This, despite
the fact that the loop counters clearly had exactly the same purpose, and
affected indexing into exactly the same array.

That was a good many years ago, when I was less confident about being able
to put my case authoritatively . (I knew I was right, but couldn't prove it
to the team leader's satisfaction.)
>In the future, I think I would take great satisfaction from teaching
programming, and concurrently working voluntarily on a Standard's
Committee.

Fine, but you still need to know about programming in the real world, be
it the open source community or commercially.
How is that relevant to comp.lang.c? I understand and indeed share your
objections to Mr Gotham's style, but surely that's his problem? He's made
his bed, and appears to be happy to lie in it. As long as he doesn't need
other people to help him out when he gets stuck, why should he change it?
The reality is that when
more than one person works on a project it is far easier to read if
everyone uses the same coding style and in the real world the majority
of complex pieces of software are worked on by multiple people.
But not all. There's nothing in the rules that says one person can't write
programs on his own. The C Standard allows the syntactic flexibility that
Mr Gotham is exploiting, and that's what matters. If we don't wish to read
it, we don't have to.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at above domain (but drop the www, obviously)
Aug 9 '06 #149

jmcgill wrote:
en******@yahoo. com wrote:
What's harsh about it? It's not topical in comp.lang.c.

I do a great deal of unit testing, functional testing, and acceptance
testing, ...
So do I ...
and I'd like to know right now if I'm going to be abused by you
if the topic comes up with regard to programming and testing C.
If the comments are specific to C, I expect I'll read them with
interest. If I think I have something to contribute, there's
a good chance I'll reply.

If the comments aren't specific to C, but labeled "OT" in the
subject line, I might read them or I might not, depending on
how much time I have etc.

If the comments aren't specific to C, and not labeled OT,
most likely I'll do nothing if they occur only occasionally.

For repeated, non-C-specific, non-OT-labelled postings,
I might respond pointing out the non-topicality and a
request to take the topic to another newsgroup.
In particular, I would like to know if you have some sort of moderator
authority, or if you are a major contributor to the forum, or any other
reason why I should refrain from putting you in my killfile at this time.
I'm a contributor. I have no official capacity, I speak
only for me.

Having said that, the reigning culture in comp.lang.c
is to remind contributors about what's considered
topical, and especially what isn't. You might want
to read for a while before deciding which people are
worth a killfile entry. But that's up to you.

Aug 9 '06 #150

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