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Pronunciation of "char"

Now I know (from Stroustrup's site) that "char" is pronounced "tchar"
and not "kar".

Does the same hold true largely in the C world?

Nov 14 '05
37 12189
On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 19:03:06 GMT, in comp.lang.c ,
ga*****@yin.int eraccess.com (Kenny McCormack) wrote:
In article <2m************ @uni-berlin.de>, Alex Fraser <me@privacy.net > wrote:

Say "tuh shah". And again, but slightly faster. And again, faster still. And
again, ...


Still don't get it. Sounds like I'm dictating a letter to a former leader
of Iran.


t(s)ch is how you write the hard ch sound (church, chicken), to
differentiate it from the soft ch (charlatan, choux) or the throatier cgh
we scots like (loch, och aye the noo).

It also helps differentiate between c(h)ar and (t)char, the fomer being
pronounced like automobile, the latter like incinerate.

FTR I think its incinerate.
--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.angelfire.c om/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc. html>
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Nov 14 '05 #21
On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 17:18:26 -0400, in comp.lang.c , Martin Ambuhl
<ma*****@earthl ink.net> wrote:
Default User wrote:
Debajit Adhikary wrote:
Now I know (from Stroustrup's site) that "char" is pronounced "tchar"
and not "kar".

Does the same hold true largely in the C world?


No no, it's pronounced "throat-warbler mangrove".


Then why isn't it spelt "Raymond Luxury Yacht"?


You're a very silly man and I'm not going to talk to you.

--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.angelfire.c om/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc. html>
----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
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---= 19 East/West-Coast Specialized Servers - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Nov 14 '05 #22
"Debajit Adhikary" <de******@gmail .com> wrote in message news:<cd******* *@odak26.prod.g oogle.com>...
Now I know (from Stroustrup's site) that "char" is pronounced "tchar"
and not "kar".

Does the same hold true largely in the C world?


In English, the word "char" is usually pronounced like the English
words "char", "car", or "care". There is a FAQ about this.

Gregory Pietsch
Nov 14 '05 #23
Kenny McCormack said the following, on 07/20/04 15:03:
In article <2m************ @uni-berlin.de>, Alex Fraser <me@privacy.net > wrote:
"Kenny McCormack" <ga*****@yin.in teraccess.com> wrote in message
news:cd****** ****@yin.intera ccess.com...
In article <2m************ @uni-berlin.de>, Alex Fraser <me@privacy.net >


wrote: [snip]

"Char" is an English word, spoken "tchar".

I don't follow this. Where is the 't' coming from?


Say "tuh shah". And again, but slightly faster. And again, faster still. And
again, ...


Still don't get it. Sounds like I'm dictating a letter to a former leader
of Iran.


The 't' is really coming from an attempt to represent the vocal
production of the 'hard ch' sound -- the one at the beginning of the
word 'charcoal' or 'cheese' -- as distinct from the 'soft ch' in
'charade' or 'champagne'.

If you pronounce 'char' as in 'charcoal', notice that the tip of your
tongue starts out behind your top teeth. That's the same position it
starts in to pronounce 'two'; that's where the 't' comes from.

--
Rich Gibbs
rg****@alumni.p rinceton.edu

Nov 14 '05 #24
Gregory Pietsch wrote:
"Debajit Adhikary" <de******@gmail .com> wrote in message news:<cd******* *@odak26.prod.g oogle.com>...
Now I know (from Stroustrup's site) that "char" is pronounced "tchar"
and not "kar".

Does the same hold true largely in the C world?

In English, the word "char" is usually pronounced like the English
words "char", "car", or "care". There is a FAQ about this.


Although I discuss C online I very rarely get the opportunity to
talk about C with other programmers. So my pronunciation of
"char" is perhaps idiosyncratic. But I hear it as (and say it
as, if I'm talking C to myself), the first syllable of the word
"character" . Thus it does not sound like any of the English words
"car", "care" or "char": it sounds like "char" as in "charisma",
or "car" as in "carapace" or "caravan". FWIW.

Allin Cottrell.
Nov 14 '05 #25
Groovy hepcat Debajit Adhikary was jivin' on 20 Jul 2004 05:21:06
-0700 in comp.lang.c.
Pronunciation of "char"'s a cool scene! Dig it!
Now I know (from Stroustrup's site) that "char" is pronounced "tchar"
and not "kar".

Does the same hold true largely in the C world?


Look, everybody knows it's pronounced "teefkac". This pronunciation
is derived from the acronym "TFKAC" which stands for "type formerly
known as char".

--

Dig the even newer still, yet more improved, sig!

http://alphalink.com.au/~phaywood/
"Ain't I'm a dog?" - Ronny Self, Ain't I'm a Dog, written by G. Sherry & W. Walker.
I know it's not "technicall y correct" English; but since when was rock & roll "technicall y correct"?
Nov 14 '05 #26
Le mardi 20 juillet 2004 à 18:36, Dan Pop a écrit dans comp.lang.c*:
In <3h************ **@canttouchthi s-127.0.0.1> Serge Paccalin <sp@mailclub.no .spam.net.inval id> writes:
Note that there is a French word spelled "char", pronounced "shar", and
meaning "tank", in the military sense (i.e. the armoured vehicule).


I know, but it is as relevant as the English "char" word.


You're right, both are relevant.

--
___________ 2004-07-21 08:12:01
_/ _ \_`_`_`_) Serge PACCALIN -- sp ad mailclub.net
\ \_L_) Il faut donc que les hommes commencent
-'(__) par n'être pas fanatiques pour mériter
_/___(_) la tolérance. -- Voltaire, 1763
Nov 14 '05 #27

On Tue, 20 Jul 2004, Allin Cottrell wrote:

Gregory Pietsch wrote:
In English, the word "char" is usually pronounced like the English
words "char", "car", or "care". There is a FAQ about this.


Although I discuss C online I very rarely get the opportunity to
talk about C with other programmers. So my pronunciation of
"char" is perhaps idiosyncratic. But I hear it as (and say it
as, if I'm talking C to myself), the first syllable of the word
"character" . Thus it does not sound like any of the English words
"car", "care" or "char": it sounds like "char" as in "charisma",
or "car" as in "carapace" or "caravan". FWIW.


Not that that's going to help many people, at least not those
that talk like me. I pronounce the "char" in "character" exactly
as in "care," ditto "carapace" (which could be "care-a-pace" or
"care-uh-piss," like "wahter"/"wutter") and "caravan." And I
pronounce "charisma" as "ker-iz-mah," with a schwa, which doesn't
sound anything like "care."

So I've got no idea how you pronounce "char," except that I'd
guess it's with either a British accent or a Southern one. :)

-Arthur
Nov 14 '05 #28
On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 22:45:11 -0400, Rich Gibbs
<rg****@REMOVEa lumni.CAPSprinc eton.edu> wrote:
Kenny McCormack said the following, on 07/20/04 15:03:
In article <2m************ @uni-berlin.de>, Alex Fraser <me@privacy.net > wrote:
"Kenny McCormack" <ga*****@yin.in teraccess.com> wrote in message
news:cd***** *****@yin.inter access.com...

In article <2m************ @uni-berlin.de>, Alex Fraser <me@privacy.net >

wrote:[snip]>
>"Char" is an English word, spoken "tchar".

I don't follow this. Where is the 't' coming from?

Say "tuh shah". And again, but slightly faster. And again, faster still. And
again, ...


Still don't get it. Sounds like I'm dictating a letter to a former leader
of Iran.


The 't' is really coming from an attempt to represent the vocal
production of the 'hard ch' sound -- the one at the beginning of the
word 'charcoal' or 'cheese' -- as distinct from the 'soft ch' in
'charade' or 'champagne'.

If you pronounce 'char' as in 'charcoal', notice that the tip of your
tongue starts out behind your top teeth. That's the same position it
starts in to pronounce 'two'; that's where the 't' comes from.


An interesting thread, though I have doubts about its topicality. Am I
the only one who pronounces "char" like the first syllable of
"character" ?

--
Al Balmer
Balmer Consulting
re************* ***********@att .net
Nov 14 '05 #29
In <9k************ *************** *****@4ax.com> Alan Balmer <al******@att.n et> writes:
An interesting thread, though I have doubts about its topicality. Am I
It's off topic because it's already covered by the FAQ.
the only one who pronounces "char" like the first syllable of
"character" ?


I suspect this is the prevalent pronunciation among the non-anglophone and
non-francophone programmers. For anglophone and francophone programmers,
only a properly conducted survey could provide some meaningful data.

Dan
--
Dan Pop
DESY Zeuthen, RZ group
Email: Da*****@ifh.de
Nov 14 '05 #30

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