473,842 Members | 1,887 Online
Bytes | Software Development & Data Engineering Community
+ Post

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

"Mastering C Pointers"....

Hey guys, I'm new here, just a simple question.

I'm learning to Program in C, and I was recommended a book called,
"Mastering C Pointers", just asking if any of you have read it,
and if it's worth the $25USD.

I'm just looking for a book on Pointers, because from what I've
read it's one of the toughest topics to understand.

thanks in advanced.

sincerely ... Andy
Nov 13 '05
388 21968
Alan Connor wrote:
What Roose posted was very helpful to me.
I'm not sure why you are so fascinated with Roose the Troll, but it's
not a good way to get good information in this newsgroup.
I am not going to dismiss an obviously intelligent and learned person on
your say so.


Irrwhan is a knowledgable and helpful member of this group. Roose is a
dispenser of bad information and a troll. I suggest reviewing the two
persons' posting history on this newsgroup via a visit to groups.google.


Brian Rodenborn
Nov 13 '05 #91
Alan Connor wrote:

[Richard Heathfield]
Well, you just crossed the line with that bit of deceitful and sophomoric
trolling.


You are making a huge mistake. Richard is a frequent posters, a textbook
author and a well-respected member of this newsgroup.

Roose, on the other hand, is a troll who willing dispenses erroneous
information and replies with flames when challenged.

I suggest you reverse your decision. Killfile Roose, do not do the same
with Richard.


Brian Rodenborn
Nov 13 '05 #92
Le*********@td. com (Lew Pitcher) wrote in message news:<3f******* ********@news21 .on.aibn.com>.. .
In college, I learned (to my later benefit) IBM 370 Assembly language.
Heh. I have an emulator for the System/360. It accepts batch jobs
(luckily, it doesn't take JCL) and returns a complete listing (a dump
if I've messed up).

Those old machines were rather interesting, especially where the
designers kind of knew what they really wanted but had to work around
the hardware to get something close.
Around
the time I got my first real job in computers, I taught myself Intel 8080
Assembly /and/ Zilog Z80 Assembly language.
Heh. I guess the fact that Z80 assembly was binary-compatible with
8080 didn't help you much, then? ;)
Prior to that, I had a brush with
PDP-10 and PDP-11 assembler language, but never really understood them.
Then I guess you never learned the beauty that is VAX, I suppose?
More's the pity: Understanding some of the intricacies of the DEC
minicomputers can help you grasp why some of C's crucial early design
decisions were made the way they were. For example, a flat memory
model and the whole notion of pre[increment|decre ment] being usefully
different from post[increment|decre ment] both came directly from the
PDPs.

Truly, C was designed to be somewhere between PDP-11 assembly and
PL/1, but closer to assembly in some key ways.

For what it's worth, I firmly believe that it would do most of the current crop
of "low level programmers" to learn IBM 370 Assembly language. This to find out
how to do things when you don't have a stack, aren't working in ASCII, and must
calculate with /very/ long decimal numbers. ;-)


And I think learning PDP-8 assembly is what seperates the men from the
boys, esepcially if you can only use the 8 `actual' opcodes. ;)
Nov 13 '05 #93
Alan Connor wrote:
On Mon, 3 Nov 2003 18:20:31 +0000 (UTC), Richard Heathfield
<do******@addre ss.co.uk.invali d> wrote:


[top-posting fixed]
Richard wrote:<snip>

Roose wrote:
Before responding, I'd appreciate it if you answer the questions you
ignored from my posts... otherwise I'm not going to bother responding to
your post, either.


I only post replies to you when it is necessary to correct your errors.
If you don't write articles, you won't make errors, so it won't be
necessary to correct them.

I think you've stumbled across a big time-saver. Well done.


Well, you just crossed the line with that bit of deceitful and sophomoric
trolling.


Not a troll, not deceitful. "Sophomoric " is a matter of opinion, of course,
but I can assure you that I am not, nor have I ever been, a sophomore.
Killfiled for N days.
You have absolutely no idea how devastated I am to hear this.
I'm into saving time too.


The biggest win is to stop reading Usenet.

--
Richard Heathfield : bi****@eton.pow ernet.co.uk
"Usenet is a strange place." - Dennis M Ritchie, 29 July 1999.
C FAQ: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
K&R answers, C books, etc: http://users.powernet.co.uk/eton
Nov 13 '05 #94
Lew Pitcher wrote:
Alan Connor <zz****@xxx.yyy > wrote:

.... snip ...

What's a "register (qualified) object"?


register int SomeThing;

as opposed to

int SomeThingElse;

Given
int *PointerToSomet hing;

you can
PointerToSometh ing = &SomeThingEl se;
but not
PointerToSometh ing = &SomeThing;
because SomeThing is a register qualified object,
but SomeThingElse is not.


Which doesn't answer his question. The above is a penalty for
using register qualification, which actually means "I think this
variable would be better handled in a register". It is only a
suggestion, and the compiler need not pay any attention to it,
other than to enforce the above penalty. With modern optimizers
it is usually better not used.

--
Chuck F (cb********@yah oo.com) (cb********@wor ldnet.att.net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home .att.net> USE worldnet address!
Nov 13 '05 #95
Alan Connor wrote:
CBFalconer <cb********@yah oo.com> wrote:
.... snip ...
Roose would be much less maligned if he would surround his
explanations with "non-precise" cavils. An unnamed number of
decades ago I had a very good mathematics instructor, who often
preceded some explanation with "this is not exact nor complete,
but it gives the general flavor. Later we will return and
develop some real proofs".


I didn't need those cavils, and he was addressing me.


You have a basic misconception. He may think he is addressing
you, and you may think he is addressing you, but in reality he is
addressing the general public, as are you and I. He may also have
been addressing points you brought up. There is nothing private
about anything said here. Thus the cavils are needed to avoid
misinforming the larger audience.

So far your evaluation of the newsgroup participants appears to be
sadly flawed.

--
Chuck F (cb********@yah oo.com) (cb********@wor ldnet.att.net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home .att.net> USE worldnet address!
Nov 13 '05 #96
On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 21:29:12 +0000, Alan Connor wrote:
Got really fed up with the Richard fellow. Killfiled his arrogant ass for
a while.


You are of course welcome to killfile anyone you want, however you
should be aware that Richard is telling you the truth and Roose is
not. At least, he is not telling you the whole truth.

For example, Roose said "a pointer is an integer". This is not
true. A pointer *might* be an integer, and it might be something
else, like two distinct integers, or something else entirely.

I understand that you might not see why it matters one way or
the other, but there is a good reason to be precisely correct
right from the start: it prevents you from making lazy assumptions
that might not bite you now, but that probably will bite you
later.

I don't know why you are learning C, but lets imagine that you
might someday want to program professionally using C. If so, you
might find it professionally embarrassing when your code crashes
the airplane, cash register, medical device, file server, robot,
etc. because you assumed that a pointer is "just an integer",
as Roose urged you to.

Perhaps you think that's just hypothetical, that you'll worry
about the details when you know C better. Well that might work,
but on the other hand, I have seen things like that happen
(well, nothing as dramatic as a plane crash) because the
programmer didn't *really* know how C worked.

-Sheldon

Nov 13 '05 #97
On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 20:39:39 GMT, in comp.lang.c , Alan Connor
<zz****@xxx.yyy > wrote:
On Mon, 3 Nov 2003 18:20:31 +0000 (UTC), Richard Heathfield <do******@addre ss.co.uk.invali d> wrote:

I think you've stumbled across a big time-saver. Well done.
Well, you just crossed the line with that bit of deceitful and sophomoric trolling.

Killfiled for N days.


I'm sorry, did you just killfile RJH?
I'm into saving time too.


well, killfiling the CLC regulars and gurus is certainly going to
achieve that. After a fashion.

--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.angelfire.c om/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc. html>
----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeed.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
---= 19 East/West-Coast Specialized Servers - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Nov 13 '05 #98
On Mon, 03 Nov 2003 00:29:05 GMT, in comp.lang.c , Alan Connor
<zz****@xxx.yyy > wrote:
--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.angelfire.c om/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc. html>
----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeed.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
---= 19 East/West-Coast Specialized Servers - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Mark: The limit for sigs on the Usenet is 4 lines and they need to be
immediately below a "-- " line.


I have no control over what alibis.com stick on after my sig, which is
three lines long.
Fix yours or I will have to killfile you.
Feel free.
What Newsfeed.Com is doing amounts to nothing but spam. Ditch them.


Its that or ntl's servers. Believe me, you don't want to use ntl's
news servers for more than about ten seconds.

By the way, are you also known as roose? I'm suspicious of your sudden
appearance in this thread, and your evident agreement with a troll.
Apologies if I'm maligining you but you see my point?
--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.angelfire.c om/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc. html>
----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeed.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
---= 19 East/West-Coast Specialized Servers - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Nov 13 '05 #99

"Richard Heathfield" <do******@addre ss.co.uk.invali d> wrote in message
news:bo******** **@titan.btinte rnet.com...
Alan Connor wrote: <snip>
Well, you just crossed the line with that bit of deceitful and sophomoric trolling.


Not a troll, not deceitful. "Sophomoric " is a matter of opinion, of

course, but I can assure you that I am not, nor have I ever been, a sophomore.


OK, I for one have been getting a good laugh at your exchanges with Roose,
but this bit surprises me. Is it a British thing, or have you really never
been in the second year of secondary school or college? EMWTK.

<snip>
Nov 13 '05 #100

This thread has been closed and replies have been disabled. Please start a new discussion.

By using Bytes.com and it's services, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

To disable or enable advertisements and analytics tracking please visit the manage ads & tracking page.