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Dotnet Interview questions and FAQs, Jobs

P: n/a
Dotnet Interview questions and FAQs, Jobs. Please give your feed back
http://interviews.dotnetthread.com
Oct 23 '08 #1
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>>>
Say we have a TextBox and Button control in one user control and we have
another TextBox in .aspx Page in wich we have placed that User Control. And
now If the user enters any text in User Control Text and clicks on Button in
User Control, that text should be displayed in .aspx page TextBox by calling
a method in page on User Control button click.
<<<

I had to read this about 3 times. You should make the control in the page a
label so that when you say "TextBox" I don't have to double-check which
TextBox you mean.
>>>
How to create DataBase tables schema diagram using SQL Server Management
Studio?
<<<

You expect me to remember each GUI step involved? This kind of task is more
of a visually intuitive thing than a memory thing, so asking someone to
remember how to do it isn't a very good question.
>>>
Difference between scripting language and a programming language?
<<<

Just not sure this is of any use at all.

I am stopping now. These look more like a FAQ than interview questions.


--
Pete
====
http://mrpmorris.blogspot.com
http://www.capableobjects.com

Oct 23 '08 #2

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Here are some things I usually ask in an interview:

1. Write a stack container class.
2. Write a method to count the set bits in an integer.
3. Explain the difference between virtual, override, and overload.
4. Explain pass by value vs. pass by reference.
5. Explain synchronization vs. atomic code.
6. Where would you use synchronization in a .Net application?
7. Why are you interested in working here?
8. What's wrong with your previous/current job?
Oct 23 '08 #3

P: n/a
Good questions.
The only hard and annoying one, which I really hate, is the last one :))

If I would be an interviewer, beside the necessary technical background I
would also ask the interviewee to tell how he would approach a task
involving a new technology which he has not worked with, what are the steps
he follows.
In my opinion, beside the technical stuff, this is uber-important which many
people overlook.
..

"not_a_commie" <no********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:4b**********************************@e38g2000 prn.googlegroups.com...
Here are some things I usually ask in an interview:

1. Write a stack container class.
2. Write a method to count the set bits in an integer.
3. Explain the difference between virtual, override, and overload.
4. Explain pass by value vs. pass by reference.
5. Explain synchronization vs. atomic code.
6. Where would you use synchronization in a .Net application?
7. Why are you interested in working here?
8. What's wrong with your previous/current job?

Oct 23 '08 #4

P: n/a
1. Write a stack container class.

would this count?

var stack = new Stack<int>();

2. Write a method to count the set bits in an integer.
hehe :-)

3. Explain the difference between virtual, override, and overload.
I remember a Delphi interview where I was asked to explain the difference
between private, protected, public, and published. He disagreed with my
description of private (which in Delphi is more like "internal"), but he
later did a test and found out I was right. It was nice to teach the
programmer something new in the interview :-)
4. Explain pass by value vs. pass by reference.
5. Explain synchronization vs. atomic code.
This doesn't mean anything to me.
6. Where would you use synchronization in a .Net application?
I don't understand what you mean by synchronization.


--
Pete
====
http://mrpmorris.blogspot.com
http://www.capableobjects.com

Oct 23 '08 #5

P: n/a
anil reddy <an**********@gmail.comwrites:
http://interviews.dotnetthread.com
* How to create DataBase tables schema diagram using SQL Server
Management Studio?

The only right answer can be: Never. :)

* Difference between scripting language and a programming language?

I think your answer is getting this completly wrong. First of all
important scripting languages like DOS, Shell-Script languages (sh,
bash, tcsh,...), Perl, Python etc. are missing. Secondly, as the
extended examples show, these language don't have to be embedded in
anything -- BTW PHP may also be used to write standalone applications
without embedding anything in HTML. And don't forget that for example
C interpreters are available and Java and C# are also mostly
interpreted (compiled to byte code which then is interpreted, much
like systems that are today available for PHP, Perl, Python etc).

The term 'scripting language' says something about the roots and maybe
about the primary design goals of a language, but nothing about its
performance, if its interpreted or compiled (or a mix) etc.

--
Stefan.
Oct 24 '08 #6

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4. Explain pass by value vs. pass by reference.
5. Explain synchronization vs. atomic code.

This doesn't mean anything to me.
I could rephrase the questions a bit:

4. Explain the difference in behavior with structs and classes in C#
including passing those into methods.
5. Explain the lock keyword in C#. Does using the lock keyword cause
the code inside it to run atomically?
Oct 24 '08 #7

P: n/a
4. Explain the difference in behavior with structs and classes in C#
including passing those into methods.
So your question is really

4. Explain the difference between reference types and value types.

I say this because I read "pass by value" as this

public void DoSomething(string passedByValue)
{
}

and "pass by reference" as this

public void DoSomething(ref string passedByReference)
{
}

Simply because you used the words "pass by", which implies a method call.
5. Explain the lock keyword in C#. Does using the lock keyword cause
the code inside it to run atomically?
I think the first part of the question is sufficient.

"Explain what the lock keyword in C# is used for". The second part of your
question is more of a clue. The answer to the second part of your question
is "Yes". The code within a lock statement will always run "automatically"
in so far as you don't need to tell it to run, however it wont run
"immediately" and may not run at all :-)

--
Pete
====
http://mrpmorris.blogspot.com
http://www.capableobjects.com

Oct 25 '08 #8

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5. Explain the lock keyword in C#. Does using the lock keyword cause
the code inside it to run atomically?
Strictly speaking the answer is no isn't it? In C# a statement is atomic if
it executes as a single indivisible instruction. Strict atomicity precludes
any possibility of preemption. In C#, a simple read or assignment on a
field of 32 bits or less is atomic (assuming a 32-bit CPU). Operations on
larger fields are non-atomic, as are statements that combine more than one
read/write operation.
Oct 25 '08 #9

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On Fri, 24 Oct 2008 08:04:49 -0700, not_a_commie <no********@gmail.com>
wrote:
4. Explain pass by value vs. pass by reference.
5. Explain synchronization vs. atomic code.

This doesn't mean anything to me.

I could rephrase the questions a bit:

4. Explain the difference in behavior with structs and classes in C#
including passing those into methods.
Hmmm...your original #4 question and the rephrased one are not at all the
same.

The original #4 question is asking about the "ref" and "out" keywords.
The modified question is asking about value types and reference types.

You can pass value types by value, value types by reference, reference
types by value, and reference types by reference.

I do think it's reasonable to ask about how the passing mechanism and the
type classifications relate to each other, but it's a mistake to equate
the two concepts.

Jon Skeet's got a page that tries to address these concepts. I always
thought it was a pretty good discussion, and it looks like he's updated it
to make it even better. So, in case what I wrote above doesn't make any
sense, you might look here for elaboration:
http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/parameters.html

Pete
Oct 25 '08 #10

P: n/a
The code within a lock statement will always run "automatically" ...

Uh, there's a big difference between "automatic" and "atomic". The
latter implies the code all runs uninterrupted, which you can never
guarantee in .Net.
Oct 29 '08 #11

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