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Why does the VS Compiler keep going after a failure?

I have 12 Projects in a Solution. If I hit "Compile" and the bottom
dependency fails then it keeps compiling all the rest.

How on earth is this sensible? It can't compile based on an invalid
dependency, and it makes no sense to try and compile based on the old
one. Surely as soon as one project fails the compilation should stop?

Anyone know if there's a way to stop it doing this?

Andy
Aug 1 '08 #1
1 918
"Andrew Ducker" <an****@ducker.org.ukwrote in message
news:ea**********************************@34g2000h sf.googlegroups.com...
>I have 12 Projects in a Solution. If I hit "Compile" and the bottom
dependency fails then it keeps compiling all the rest.

How on earth is this sensible? It can't compile based on an invalid
dependency, and it makes no sense to try and compile based on the old
one. Surely as soon as one project fails the compilation should stop?

Anyone know if there's a way to stop it doing this?

Andy

Actually, it makes perfect sense from the standpoint that your other
assemblies may have other internal compile errors that the compiler can
catch even when a dependency failed to compile.

Mike.
Aug 3 '08 #2

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