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Captured variables

var result = new List<StockLevelRow>();
foreach(SomeClass c in SomeList)
result.Add(
new StockLevelRow(c.Name,
delegate() { return c.StockLevel; },
delegate(int value) { c.StockLevel = value; }
)
);

This is a PITA because the last variable assigned to "c" is captured by each
of the two delegates. Is there a simple workaround for this? If not then I
am going to have to make my StockLevelRow class abstract and create a
concrete descendant for each different way I have of obtaining/setting the
StockLevelRow.Quantity (which currently uses a get and set delegate passed
to it).
Thanks
Pete

Jul 21 '08 #1
7 1775
On Jul 21, 11:16*am, "Peter Morris" <mrpmorri...@SPAMgmail.comwrote:
var result = new List<StockLevelRow>();
foreach(SomeClass c in SomeList)
* * result.Add(
* * * * new StockLevelRow(c.Name,
* * * * * * delegate() { return c.StockLevel; },
* * * * * * delegate(int value) { c.StockLevel = value; }
* * * * )
* * );

This is a PITA because the last variable assigned to "c" is captured by each
of the two delegates. *Is there a simple workaround for this? *If notthen I
am going to have to make my StockLevelRow class abstract and create a
concrete descendant for each different way I have of obtaining/setting the
StockLevelRow.Quantity (which currently uses a get and set delegate passed
to it).
Copy the variable:

var result = new List<StockLevelRow>();
foreach(SomeClass c in SomeList) {
SomeClass copy = c;
result.Add(
new StockLevelRow(copy.Name,
delegate() { return copy.StockLevel; },
delegate(int value) { copy.StockLevel = value; }
)
);
}

Jon
Jul 21 '08 #2
I decided to keep the original + more complicated code that already existed
(descendant classes) for now. I will remember your tip for next time I need
it, thanks! :-)

Jul 21 '08 #3
On Mon, 21 Jul 2008 03:16:19 -0700, Peter Morris
<mr*********@SPAMgmail.comwrote:
var result = new List<StockLevelRow>();
foreach(SomeClass c in SomeList)
result.Add(
new StockLevelRow(c.Name,
delegate() { return c.StockLevel; },
delegate(int value) { c.StockLevel = value; }
)
);

This is a PITA because the last variable assigned to "c" is captured by
each of the two delegates. Is there a simple workaround for this?
For what it's worth, if you think this "is a PITA", it's my opinion you're
looking at it the wrong way.

The variable capturing rules are the way the are for consistency, and if
it _didn't_ work that way, it could be a genuine "PITA" for other
scenarios.

I do wonder if what you're doing wouldn't be better addressed using an
interface that defines the property you seem to be implementing via
anonymous methods here, but that's a different question altogether. :)

Pete
Jul 21 '08 #4
It's a PITA if it is causing me a PITA. Whether or not it is supposed to
cause me a PITA is irrelevant :-)
>>
I do wonder if what you're doing wouldn't be better addressed using an
interface that defines the property you seem to be implementing via
anonymous methods here, but that's a different question altogether. :)
<<

I agree that it is more like an interface and to be "more proper" should be
implemented as an interface. However, this would result in the same thing,
lots of subclasses :-) I am basically binding a reusable GUI "Record Stock
Levels" to different classes, so this is acting like a mediator.

Case 1:
Quantity maps to StockCheck.QuantityOnHand

Case 2:
Quantity maps to Replenishment.QuantityAdded

Case 3:
Quantity maps to Replenishment.OpeningLevel

and so on, there are about 6 cases. I just thought having a single class
with delegates for Get/Set quantity would be easier than having to write a
mediator for each class. I don't want to add an interface to StockCheck etc
because the interface would be for GUI purposes only, and I don't like
adding GUI specific stuff to my business classes, it's a PITA ;-)

Knowing that a local variable will do the trick is useful information that I
will put to good use in future.
Pete

Jul 21 '08 #5
On Jul 21, 7:43*pm, "Peter Duniho" <NpOeStPe...@nnowslpianmk.com>
wrote:
The variable capturing rules are the way the are for consistency, and if *
it _didn't_ work that way, it could be a genuine "PITA" for other *
scenarios.
To be honest, I can hardly come up with a scenario where the existing
rule for capturing of the foreach variable (or rather, the rule for
the scoping of that variable seen in context of capturing) would be
useful. I wonder why they didn't just move the declaration of the
variable in foreach expansion inside the loop body when they
introduced closures in 2.0.
Jul 21 '08 #6
On Mon, 21 Jul 2008 11:44:14 -0700, Pavel Minaev <in****@gmail.comwrote:
To be honest, I can hardly come up with a scenario where the existing
rule for capturing of the foreach variable (or rather, the rule for
the scoping of that variable seen in context of capturing) would be
useful. I wonder why they didn't just move the declaration of the
variable in foreach expansion inside the loop body when they
introduced closures in 2.0.
You'd have to ask the designers to know for sure. However, it seems to me
that there's value in having the "for" loop consistent with the "foreach"
loop, and obviously the "for" loop _must_ not have variables declared in
the statement created anew with each iteration of the loop.

As far as I know, the "foreach" variable never depends on its previous
value; it's always just being reassigned from the enumerator. But
changing the scoping semantics of "foreach" would make it inconsistent
with the rest of the language. If nothing else, that's inelegant, and it
could in fact lead to more manifestations of the variable-capturing error,
in the context of "for" loops (i.e. a programmer could incorrectly infer
that capturing a "for" iteration variable would work the same as capturing
a "foreach" iteration variable).

Pete
Jul 21 '08 #7
Pavel Minaev <in****@gmail.comwrote:
On Jul 21, 7:43*pm, "Peter Duniho" <NpOeStPe...@nnowslpianmk.com>
wrote:
The variable capturing rules are the way the are for consistency, and if *
it _didn't_ work that way, it could be a genuine "PITA" for other *
scenarios.
To be honest, I can hardly come up with a scenario where the existing
rule for capturing of the foreach variable (or rather, the rule for
the scoping of that variable seen in context of capturing) would be
useful. I wonder why they didn't just move the declaration of the
variable in foreach expansion inside the loop body when they
introduced closures in 2.0.
Indeed - especially as the natural way of reading "for each int i" is
that there are multiple "i" variables. On the other hand, that would be
inconsistent with "for" (which really does only declare variables
once).

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
Web site: http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
Blog: http://www.msmvps.com/jon.skeet
C# in Depth: http://csharpindepth.com
Jul 21 '08 #8

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