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Compiler warnings and performance

P: n/a
Hi,

I have built an application containing a few projects (nothing that I have
written)and there are a few compiler warnings (obsolete methods and the like).

Does anyone know if these obsolete methods cause any performance issues if
not corrected? I would imagine that they do, but would be interested to know
to what extent.
Jun 27 '08 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
On Tue, 22 Apr 2008 08:17:02 -0700, cashdeskmac
<ca*********@discussions.microsoft.comwrote:
I have built an application containing a few projects (nothing that I
have
written)and there are a few compiler warnings (obsolete methods and the
like).

Does anyone know if these obsolete methods cause any performance issues
if
not corrected? I would imagine that they do, but would be interested to
know
to what extent.
Why would they?

Deprecated/obsolete methods usually happen because the .NET designers feel
they came up with a better way to do something. That doesn't necessarily
mean that the older way performed more poorly.

If you have a specific example, I'm sure some specific advice can be
offered. Other than that, I'd say that the general rule of thumb is to
try hard to avoid having warnings in your code. Not because they might
imply poor performance, but because they are usually telling you something
important about the way you wrote your code that could lead to other
problems (such as incorrect output, lack of a future-proof upgrade path,
etc.).

Pete
Jun 27 '08 #2

P: n/a
On Apr 22, 8:17*am, cashdeskmac
<cashdesk...@discussions.microsoft.comwrote:
Hi,

I have built an application containing a few projects (nothing that I have
written)and there are a few compiler warnings (obsolete methods and the like).

Does anyone know if these obsolete methods cause any performance issues if
not corrected? *I would imagine that they do, but would be interested toknow
to what extent.
IMHO, I think performance concerns should be the least of your worries
if you have code with obsolete warings.
I would have to assume there isn't any way to measure performance
using obsolete api's on a machine with multiple .NET runtimes.
Jun 27 '08 #3

P: n/a
As I said, it wasn't code that I had written. This is part of an application
containing over 380 projects and which has been upgraded from v1.1 to v3.0 in
the last few months. It has also had an upgrade to a third party data
retrieval layer and it is this which is creating all of the obselete method
warnings. As is often the case, though, there is no money to pay for a clean
up of the code, so things will probably be left as they are.
Jun 27 '08 #4

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