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How can a person become a C# MVP

P: n/a
How can a person become a C# MVP.. or say a complete MVP?
What are the details:
1. What are the recommended books?
2. How many papers are there?
3. How to go about studying it? Where to do the practicals ?
4. What is the fee structure?
etc. etc.

Regards
Dec 20 '07 #1
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P: n/a
"weird0" <am********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:9b**********************************@n20g2000 hsh.googlegroups.com...
How can a person become a C# MVP.. or say a complete MVP?
What are the details:
1. What are the recommended books?
2. How many papers are there?
3. How to go about studying it? Where to do the practicals ?
4. What is the fee structure?
etc. etc.
I believe that you mean an MCP (Microsoft Certified Professional) instead
of MVP (Most Valuable Professional).

You can study to become an MCP, and then take some examinations, and you
become an MCP automatically if you pass them (see
www.microsoft.com/learning).
On the other hand, MVP is an award that you get for your contributions to
the community. This is not automatic. Someone has to nominate you, and then
Microsoft chooses who get the awards from among those who are nominated.

Dec 20 '07 #3

P: n/a
Just to elaborate on previous responses, if you do in fact mean MVP, the
MVP program is not a certification, it is an award that is given out to
those that contribute in peer-to-peer environments for Microsoft
Technologies. That being said, there is no set criteria for being awarded
MVP status, and it is at the discretion of MS to do so (the party line,
which I have not seen them deviate from is there is no criteria, that people
are evaluated on a case-by-case basis).
--
- Nicholas Paldino [.NET/C# MVP]
- mv*@spam.guard.caspershouse.com

"weird0" <am********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:9b**********************************@n20g2000 hsh.googlegroups.com...
How can a person become a C# MVP.. or say a complete MVP?
What are the details:
1. What are the recommended books?
2. How many papers are there?
3. How to go about studying it? Where to do the practicals ?
4. What is the fee structure?
etc. etc.

Regards

Dec 20 '07 #4

P: n/a
I am really interested in the certification of C#, especially if it
earns me a better pay. Reading the Wrox books just does not seem
enough, because I find it very hard to implement each and every
tutorial, to learn the language.

Are the certification recommended books any better? What are the
career future prospects of doing MCP?

Regards
Jan 6 '08 #5

P: n/a
weird0 <am********@gmail.comwrote:
I am really interested in the certification of C#, especially if it
earns me a better pay. Reading the Wrox books just does not seem
enough, because I find it very hard to implement each and every
tutorial, to learn the language.

Are the certification recommended books any better? What are the
career future prospects of doing MCP?
I personally value certifications far less than a genuine interest in
technology and passion in learning. Concentrate on becoming a better
developer, and you will become more valuable at the same time.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet Blog: http://www.msmvps.com/jon.skeet
World class .NET training in the UK: http://iterativetraining.co.uk
Jan 6 '08 #6

P: n/a
Jon Skeet [C# MVP] wrote:
weird0 <am********@gmail.comwrote:
>I am really interested in the certification of C#, especially if it
earns me a better pay. Reading the Wrox books just does not seem
enough, because I find it very hard to implement each and every
tutorial, to learn the language.

Are the certification recommended books any better? What are the
career future prospects of doing MCP?
I personally value certifications far less than a genuine interest in
technology and passion in learning. Concentrate on becoming a better
developer, and you will become more valuable at the same time.
I agree completly, but unfortunatly, there are a lot of companies who
has people with absolutly no IT skills, reading the job applications,
and they thing certificats must mean good developers. So to get through
the first screening, the certificates can help.

And depending on how you do it, you could actually learn something while
doing the certifications.

/Søren

Jan 6 '08 #7

P: n/a
Søren Reinke <so***@REMOVE.reinke.dkwrote:
I personally value certifications far less than a genuine interest in
technology and passion in learning. Concentrate on becoming a better
developer, and you will become more valuable at the same time.
I agree completly, but unfortunatly, there are a lot of companies who
has people with absolutly no IT skills, reading the job applications,
and they thing certificats must mean good developers. So to get through
the first screening, the certificates can help.
Yes, sometimes. Personally I wouldn't usually want to work for a
company which valued certification that much, mind you :)
And depending on how you do it, you could actually learn something while
doing the certifications.
That's true - but I suspect you'd generally learn more by learning for
the sake of learning.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet Blog: http://www.msmvps.com/jon.skeet
World class .NET training in the UK: http://iterativetraining.co.uk
Jan 6 '08 #8

P: n/a
Jon,

Its good to hear from you about - how to become better developer?
I have very good experience (in number of years) doing development.
Personally, I haven't grown to the extent - I should have.

I should be able to design/architect things by now. But, I have been an
under-performer.

Let me give you an example & may I ask you to evaluate it?
I am asked in an interview - the asp.net page lifecycle. Now, I do not
know, what is the sequence & name of the event. Personally, I feel one
can find/use appropriate events or methods at the time of need than to
remember it all.

What do you think about this?
Also, what are the small steps one should take to become good developer
one step at a time? I feel, having to work in an organization that
supports that kind of culture - could be a good help.

Your advice is highly appreciated.

BTW, in this www world, I have learnt from people - who I havent met
personally yet. You are one of them. I watch for threads on which you
post your reply

Thanks for being a good teacher.

Kalpesh
Jan 6 '08 #9

P: n/a
Jon Skeet [C# MVP] wrote:
Søren Reinke <so***@REMOVE.reinke.dkwrote:
>>I personally value certifications far less than a genuine interest in
technology and passion in learning. Concentrate on becoming a better
developer, and you will become more valuable at the same time.
I agree completly, but unfortunatly, there are a lot of companies who
has people with absolutly no IT skills, reading the job applications,
and they thing certificats must mean good developers. So to get through
the first screening, the certificates can help.
Yes, sometimes. Personally I wouldn't usually want to work for a
company which valued certification that much, mind you :)
True, but sometimes the companies have funny policies when hiring people.
And you need to get through the people doing the hiring first, even
worse when they use external compnies for screening new employees. (At
least in Denmark and Germany)
>And depending on how you do it, you could actually learn something while
doing the certifications.
That's true - but I suspect you'd generally learn more by learning for
the sake of learning.
That depends purely on the person doing the studying.

You could do the :
World class .NET training in the UK: http://iterativetraining.co.uk :-)
without learning a thing, while taking some certifications and learn a lot.
And of course also the other way around.

It depends purely on the person doing the learning.

/Søren
Jan 6 '08 #10

P: n/a
Kalpesh <sh*********@gmail.comwrote:
Its good to hear from you about - how to become better developer?
Read, practise, absorb everything you can, basically. There's more to
read than anyone could ever actually finish - always more to learn.
Encourage your colleagues to review your code, and try to learn from
them.
I have very good experience (in number of years) doing development.
Personally, I haven't grown to the extent - I should have.

I should be able to design/architect things by now. But, I have been an
under-performer.

Let me give you an example & may I ask you to evaluate it?
I am asked in an interview - the asp.net page lifecycle. Now, I do not
know, what is the sequence & name of the event. Personally, I feel one
can find/use appropriate events or methods at the time of need than to
remember it all.
Indeed. I don't tend to ask detailed questions like that except for
fundamentals. I'd expect a *few* ASP.NET events to be known about, but
not all of them. However, for an alternative of the kind of thing I
*do* expect people to know, I sometimes present people with a list of
types (string, object, Guid, double, Stream, int, etc - well known
types) and ask which are value types and which are reference types.
Asking people to describe the differences between value types and
reference types is also interesting in an interview.
What do you think about this?
Also, what are the small steps one should take to become good developer
one step at a time? I feel, having to work in an organization that
supports that kind of culture - could be a good help.
Absolutely. Anywhere that encourages personal development (in reality -
not just in theory) is good.
Your advice is highly appreciated.

BTW, in this www world, I have learnt from people - who I havent met
personally yet. You are one of them. I watch for threads on which you
post your reply

Thanks for being a good teacher.
My pleasure :) I'm always learning from others too.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet Blog: http://www.msmvps.com/jon.skeet
World class .NET training in the UK: http://iterativetraining.co.uk
Jan 6 '08 #11

P: n/a

Thanks Jon for your reply.
I am looking forward to your book here in India

Best wishes
Kalpesh
Jon Skeet [C# MVP] wrote:
Kalpesh <sh*********@gmail.comwrote:
>Its good to hear from you about - how to become better developer?

Read, practise, absorb everything you can, basically. There's more to
read than anyone could ever actually finish - always more to learn.
Encourage your colleagues to review your code, and try to learn from
them.
>I have very good experience (in number of years) doing development.
Personally, I haven't grown to the extent - I should have.

I should be able to design/architect things by now. But, I have been an
under-performer.

Let me give you an example & may I ask you to evaluate it?
I am asked in an interview - the asp.net page lifecycle. Now, I do not
know, what is the sequence & name of the event. Personally, I feel one
can find/use appropriate events or methods at the time of need than to
remember it all.

Indeed. I don't tend to ask detailed questions like that except for
fundamentals. I'd expect a *few* ASP.NET events to be known about, but
not all of them. However, for an alternative of the kind of thing I
*do* expect people to know, I sometimes present people with a list of
types (string, object, Guid, double, Stream, int, etc - well known
types) and ask which are value types and which are reference types.
Asking people to describe the differences between value types and
reference types is also interesting in an interview.
>What do you think about this?
Also, what are the small steps one should take to become good developer
one step at a time? I feel, having to work in an organization that
supports that kind of culture - could be a good help.

Absolutely. Anywhere that encourages personal development (in reality -
not just in theory) is good.
>Your advice is highly appreciated.

BTW, in this www world, I have learnt from people - who I havent met
personally yet. You are one of them. I watch for threads on which you
post your reply

Thanks for being a good teacher.

My pleasure :) I'm always learning from others too.
Jan 6 '08 #12

P: n/a
Kalpesh,
I am asked in an interview - the asp.net page lifecycle. Now, I do not
know, what is the sequence & name of the event. Personally, I feel one can
find/use appropriate events or methods at the time of need than to
remember it all.
Be aware that some persons who ask questions don't know the answer too. They
often have read something about it and don't themselves know what is really
meant with this.

Probably was in this case meant that an asp page is stateless, however in my
opinion has that not much to do with the lifetime of an asp.page. That can
be endless if a user keeps his/her computer all time on and never close
his/her browser/tab containing that page.

Cor
Jan 6 '08 #13

P: n/a
Kalpesh <sh*********@gmail.comwrote:
Thanks Jon for your reply.
I am looking forward to your book here in India
Me too - I'm anxious to see it all on properly printed paper etc. Not
long to go now :)

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet Blog: http://www.msmvps.com/jon.skeet
World class .NET training in the UK: http://iterativetraining.co.uk
Jan 6 '08 #14

P: n/a
>
Me too - I'm anxious to see it all on properly printed paper etc. Not
long to go now :)
Jon,

Will you sent me a mail as it is there?

Cor
Jan 6 '08 #15

P: n/a
On Jan 6, 7:50*pm, Kalpesh <shahkalp...@gmail.comwrote:
Jon,

Its good to hear from you about - how to become better developer?
I have very good experience (in number of years) doing development.
Personally, I haven't grown to the extent - I should have.

I should be able to design/architect things by now. But, I have been an
under-performer.

Let me give you an example & may I ask you to evaluate it?
I am asked in an interview - the asp.net page lifecycle. Now, I do not
know, what is the sequence & name of the event. Personally, I feel one
can find/use appropriate events or methods at the time of need than to
remember it all.

What do you think about this?
Also, what are the small steps one should take to become good developer
one step at a time? I feel, having to work in an organization that
supports that kind of culture - could be a good help.

Your advice is highly appreciated.

BTW, in this www world, I have learnt from people - who I havent met
personally yet. You are one of them. I watch for threads on which you
post your reply

Thanks for being a good teacher.

Kalpesh
Please go through this site ::: http://bytescode.blogspot.cok
Jan 6 '08 #16

P: n/a
When I interview candidates, I tend not to focus on particulars like
sequence of events. That doesn't prevent a developer from producing real
work, it's easy to look up that stuff on MSDN. What is important to me is an
understanding of the framework, how memory is used and allocated and
performance tips and tricks. Lack of that knowledge will bring down an
application server.

--
--
Regards,
Alvin Bruney [MVP ASP.NET]

[Shameless Author plug]
The O.W.C. Black Book, 2nd Edition
Exclusively on www.lulu.com/owc $19.99
"Cor Ligthert[MVP]" <no************@planet.nlwrote in message
news:F7**********************************@microsof t.com...
Kalpesh,
>I am asked in an interview - the asp.net page lifecycle. Now, I do not
know, what is the sequence & name of the event. Personally, I feel one
can find/use appropriate events or methods at the time of need than to
remember it all.

Be aware that some persons who ask questions don't know the answer too.
They often have read something about it and don't themselves know what is
really meant with this.

Probably was in this case meant that an asp page is stateless, however in
my opinion has that not much to do with the lifetime of an asp.page. That
can be endless if a user keeps his/her computer all time on and never
close his/her browser/tab containing that page.

Cor

Jan 7 '08 #17

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