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Is Enterprise Library the successor to Enterprise Services?

Hi,

I was wondering whether the Enterprise Library replaces Enterprise Services
as a framework for providing services for enterprise apps,
or it supplements it. I know nothing of either of these technologies, but
from just looking at their feature set,
I noticed that they don't exactly share the same features, for example ES
offers services such as just-in-time activation
and object pooling that I don't see in EL. I need to know if I should learn
both these technologies or just one,
so I could better plan my schedule.

Thanks,
Ben
Sep 4 '07 #1
4 1391

"Ben" <Be*@discussions.microsoft.comwrote in message
news:2D**********************************@microsof t.com...
Hi,

I was wondering whether the Enterprise Library replaces Enterprise
Services
as a framework for providing services for enterprise apps,
or it supplements it. I know nothing of either of these technologies, but
from just looking at their feature set,
I noticed that they don't exactly share the same features, for example ES
offers services such as just-in-time activation
and object pooling that I don't see in EL. I need to know if I should
learn
both these technologies or just one,
so I could better plan my schedule.
EL is a library of routines that do some stuff for you that you can call
upon to do certain things instead of you having to re-invent the wheel to
accomplish it.

<http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=5a14e870-406b-4f2a-b723-97ba84ae80b5&displaylang=en>

Basically, ES is a set of services in the .Net Framework for distributed
*enterprise* application development.

IMHO, you should be aware of what both have to offer, because you never know
when you may find a need and at least you'll know about them.
http://www.dotnet-guide.com/enterpriseservices.html

Sep 4 '07 #2
Mr. Arnold wrote:
EL is a library of routines that do some stuff for you that you can
call upon to do certain things instead of you having to re-invent the
wheel to accomplish it.
Here is the link for EL version 3.1.

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/d...C557C63-708F-4
280-8F0C-637481C31718&displaylang=en

--
Andre Prins
Twain Development
Sep 4 '07 #3
That definition of Enterprise Services isn't completely correct.
Distributed application development is one feature that Enterprise Services
offers. Enterprise Services is really the .NET wrapper for the services
offered by COM+, which include (but are not limited to) distributed calls,
authentication/authorization, object pooling, queued calls, web service
exposure, transaction management, and a number of other services.
--
- Nicholas Paldino [.NET/C# MVP]
- mv*@spam.guard.caspershouse.com

"Mr. Arnold" <MR. Ar****@Arnold.comwrote in message
news:eo**************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>
"Ben" <Be*@discussions.microsoft.comwrote in message
news:2D**********************************@microsof t.com...
>Hi,

I was wondering whether the Enterprise Library replaces Enterprise
Services
as a framework for providing services for enterprise apps,
or it supplements it. I know nothing of either of these technologies, but
from just looking at their feature set,
I noticed that they don't exactly share the same features, for example ES
offers services such as just-in-time activation
and object pooling that I don't see in EL. I need to know if I should
learn
both these technologies or just one,
so I could better plan my schedule.

EL is a library of routines that do some stuff for you that you can call
upon to do certain things instead of you having to re-invent the wheel to
accomplish it.

<http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=5a14e870-406b-4f2a-b723-97ba84ae80b5&displaylang=en>

Basically, ES is a set of services in the .Net Framework for distributed
*enterprise* application development.

IMHO, you should be aware of what both have to offer, because you never
know when you may find a need and at least you'll know about them.
http://www.dotnet-guide.com/enterpriseservices.html

Sep 4 '07 #4

"Andre Prins" <no@mail.thankswrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
Mr. Arnold wrote:
>EL is a library of routines that do some stuff for you that you can
call upon to do certain things instead of you having to re-invent the
wheel to accomplish it.

Here is the link for EL version 3.1.

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/d...C557C63-708F-4
280-8F0C-637481C31718&displaylang=en
Just FYI, if you have a long URL, then you can use < and to enclose the
URL so one doesn't have to cut and paste pieces of the URL to the browser
address line, when the line wraps. One can just click on the URL enclosed <
url with the symbols enclosing the URL in the post and go to the site.
This doesn't work here because I just did a copy and paste from above.

<http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/d...C557C63-708F-4
280-8F0C-637481C31718&displaylang=en>

You can also use www.tinyurl.com.

Sep 5 '07 #5

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