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system.configuration.provider

P: n/a
Hi

I was wondering if anyone had experience of using the "provider model" in
..net. I have only just stumbled across this pattern/model and am trying to
evaluate if it is worth while learning and using it.

Basically all the projects I work on have a data persistence layer (which
seems to be what the .net provider model is about?), and we generally build
our systems up in "pluggable modules" which theoretically means we could
swap out an sql-data-provider with an oracle-data-provider (although I have
_never_ worked on a project where this sort of thing has actually happened).

Is that idea basically what the provider model strives to achieve: a
consistent data-persistence interface?

I have used the Spring Framework before for class instantiation and
configuration, and the provider model also provides for this (runtime
configuration and instantiation of objects). Are there benefits with the
..net provider model over the spring framework's object instantiation and
configuration model?

Thanks for any advice,
Peter
Oct 18 '06 #1
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P: n/a
See: Flexible and Plug-in-based .NET Application using Provider Pattern at
http://www.codeproject.com/dotnet/smartjobmanager.asp

better way to go is not to check how to apply a existing model in ur system
by changing your system but rather see whether there is a existing model
that can help you to build your system easier..

Also for general info
http://www.codeproject.com/useritems/System_Design.asp

Thanks
CN

"Peter Kirk" <pk@alpha-solutions.dkwrote in message
news:O2**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
Hi

I was wondering if anyone had experience of using the "provider model" in
.net. I have only just stumbled across this pattern/model and am trying to
evaluate if it is worth while learning and using it.

Basically all the projects I work on have a data persistence layer (which
seems to be what the .net provider model is about?), and we generally
build our systems up in "pluggable modules" which theoretically means we
could swap out an sql-data-provider with an oracle-data-provider (although
I have _never_ worked on a project where this sort of thing has actually
happened).

Is that idea basically what the provider model strives to achieve: a
consistent data-persistence interface?

I have used the Spring Framework before for class instantiation and
configuration, and the provider model also provides for this (runtime
configuration and instantiation of objects). Are there benefits with the
.net provider model over the spring framework's object instantiation and
configuration model?

Thanks for any advice,
Peter

Oct 18 '06 #2

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