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Generic C# List<> resize vs. Template C++ vector resize

P: n/a
I'm learning a lesson in how I need to be more specific :)

In C++ I can resize a vector and it will allocate memory and it will
call the default constructor if necessary (or I can supply an instance
for the copy constructor).

For example:

C++
vector<classvClass;

vClass.resize(1000);
vClass[37].Property = 4;

C#
List<classlstClass;

lstClass = new List<class>(1000);
for (int instance = 0; instance != 1000; ++instance)
vClass.Add(new class());
vClass[37].Property = 4;

I'm hoping there is a better way then my loop.

Jeff

GhostInAK wrote:
Hello Je*********@gmail.com,

Check out .Add(), .Remove(), and .Capacity

-Boo
Thanks, but I meant the generic List which is part of ,Net 2.0.

Jeff
ad***@binindex.net wrote:
You can use an arraylist. Is that what you are talking about.
Jeff.Boe...@gmail.com wrote:

Hello,

It looks like there is no List<resize in C#, similar to C++'s STL
vector<>. Am I missing some alternative?

Thanks,

jeff
Sep 27 '06 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
Jeff,

Nope. Short of extending list to take a delegate which is called for
the construction of new instances, there isn't much you can do.

Hope this helps.
--
- Nicholas Paldino [.NET/C# MVP]
- mv*@spam.guard.caspershouse.com

<Je*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@m73g2000cwd.googlegr oups.com...
I'm learning a lesson in how I need to be more specific :)

In C++ I can resize a vector and it will allocate memory and it will
call the default constructor if necessary (or I can supply an instance
for the copy constructor).

For example:

C++
vector<classvClass;

vClass.resize(1000);
vClass[37].Property = 4;

C#
List<classlstClass;

lstClass = new List<class>(1000);
for (int instance = 0; instance != 1000; ++instance)
vClass.Add(new class());
vClass[37].Property = 4;

I'm hoping there is a better way then my loop.

Jeff

GhostInAK wrote:
>Hello Je*********@gmail.com,

Check out .Add(), .Remove(), and .Capacity

-Boo
Thanks, but I meant the generic List which is part of ,Net 2.0.

Jeff
ad***@binindex.net wrote:
You can use an arraylist. Is that what you are talking about.
Jeff.Boe...@gmail.com wrote:

Hello,

It looks like there is no List<resize in C#, similar to C++'s STL
vector<>. Am I missing some alternative?

Thanks,

jeff

Sep 27 '06 #2

P: n/a
Hello Je*********@gmail.com,

My mistake.
You could create an array of objects.. SomeClass tArray[1000]
Then call the array's .Initialize method. Then pass the array to the generic's
..AddRange method.

YUCK.

-Boo
I'm learning a lesson in how I need to be more specific :)

In C++ I can resize a vector and it will allocate memory and it will
call the default constructor if necessary (or I can supply an instance
for the copy constructor).

For example:

C++
vector<classvClass;
vClass.resize(1000);
vClass[37].Property = 4;
C#
List<classlstClass;
lstClass = new List<class>(1000);
for (int instance = 0; instance != 1000; ++instance)
vClass.Add(new class());
vClass[37].Property = 4;
I'm hoping there is a better way then my loop.

Jeff

GhostInAK wrote:
>Hello Je*********@gmail.com,

Check out .Add(), .Remove(), and .Capacity

-Boo
>>Thanks, but I meant the generic List which is part of ,Net 2.0.

Jeff
ad***@binindex.net wrote:
You can use an arraylist. Is that what you are talking about.
Jeff.Boe...@gmail.com wrote:

Hello,
>
It looks like there is no List<resize in C#, similar to C++'s
STL vector<>. Am I missing some alternative?
>
Thanks,
>
jeff
>


Sep 27 '06 #3

P: n/a
Interesting idea, thanks.

Jeff
GhostInAK wrote:
Hello Je*********@gmail.com,

My mistake.
You could create an array of objects.. SomeClass tArray[1000]
Then call the array's .Initialize method. Then pass the array to the generic's
.AddRange method.

YUCK.

-Boo
I'm learning a lesson in how I need to be more specific :)

In C++ I can resize a vector and it will allocate memory and it will
call the default constructor if necessary (or I can supply an instance
for the copy constructor).

For example:

C++
vector<classvClass;
vClass.resize(1000);
vClass[37].Property = 4;
C#
List<classlstClass;
lstClass = new List<class>(1000);
for (int instance = 0; instance != 1000; ++instance)
vClass.Add(new class());
vClass[37].Property = 4;
I'm hoping there is a better way then my loop.

Jeff

GhostInAK wrote:
Hello Je*********@gmail.com,

Check out .Add(), .Remove(), and .Capacity

-Boo

Thanks, but I meant the generic List which is part of ,Net 2.0.

Jeff
ad***@binindex.net wrote:
You can use an arraylist. Is that what you are talking about.
Jeff.Boe...@gmail.com wrote:

Hello,

It looks like there is no List<resize in C#, similar to C++'s
STL vector<>. Am I missing some alternative?

Thanks,

jeff
Sep 28 '06 #4

P: n/a
Hello Nicholas,

Thanks for confirming that. I'm curious why such a function wasn't
build in. I'm sure the designer of the List class looked at C++'s
vector and made a conscious decision to omit it.

Jeff

Nicholas Paldino [.NET/C# MVP] wrote:
Jeff,

Nope. Short of extending list to take a delegate which is called for
the construction of new instances, there isn't much you can do.

Hope this helps.
--
- Nicholas Paldino [.NET/C# MVP]
- mv*@spam.guard.caspershouse.com

<Je*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@m73g2000cwd.googlegr oups.com...
I'm learning a lesson in how I need to be more specific :)

In C++ I can resize a vector and it will allocate memory and it will
call the default constructor if necessary (or I can supply an instance
for the copy constructor).

For example:

C++
vector<classvClass;

vClass.resize(1000);
vClass[37].Property = 4;

C#
List<classlstClass;

lstClass = new List<class>(1000);
for (int instance = 0; instance != 1000; ++instance)
vClass.Add(new class());
vClass[37].Property = 4;

I'm hoping there is a better way then my loop.

Jeff

GhostInAK wrote:
Hello Je*********@gmail.com,

Check out .Add(), .Remove(), and .Capacity

-Boo

Thanks, but I meant the generic List which is part of ,Net 2.0.

Jeff
ad***@binindex.net wrote:
You can use an arraylist. Is that what you are talking about.
Jeff.Boe...@gmail.com wrote:

Hello,

It looks like there is no List<resize in C#, similar to C++'s STL
vector<>. Am I missing some alternative?

Thanks,

jeff
Sep 28 '06 #5

P: n/a
Runtime performance and simplicity I'd say. The idea is that memory
only needs to be zeroed when the backing array is extended or elements
are recycled. If the List class did call a default constructor for
each element someone could write a very slow constructor that would
effectively hang the program at this point.

On 27 Sep 2006 18:46:46 -0700, Je*********@gmail.com wrote:
>Hello Nicholas,

Thanks for confirming that. I'm curious why such a function wasn't
build in. I'm sure the designer of the List class looked at C++'s
vector and made a conscious decision to omit it.

Jeff
--
http://www.kynosarges.de
Sep 28 '06 #6

P: n/a
"Chris Nahr" <ch************@kynosarges.dewrote in message
news:l6********************************@4ax.com...
Runtime performance and simplicity I'd say. The idea is that memory
only needs to be zeroed when the backing array is extended or elements
are recycled. If the List class did call a default constructor for
each element someone could write a very slow constructor that would
effectively hang the program at this point.
Actually, I think it's an oversight or a deliberate simplification.

The C++ std::vector has exactly the same issues, the designers of that
library simply decided that it was better to expose the functionality and
let the programmer decide when/if to use it, rather than assuming that the
designer always knows best.

-cd
Sep 28 '06 #7

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