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NHibernate, Codus

Hi

Can somebody throw some light on what are these tools and which is the best
to use?

I would like to know, where do these tools fit in ? and how does it help?

Thanks
Prem
Sep 13 '06 #1
5 2490
These tools are for the object-relation mapping.
Read about it there http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object-relational_mapping

What best to use is a bit arguing question. Apparently that is the best
suits u :)
But from the other perspective NHibernate is more popular, it's the .net
port of java hibernate version.
I'd recoment to look at ADO Entity Framework, if u are interesting in O/R
Mapping.
--
WBR,
Michael Nemtsev :: blog: http://spaces.msn.com/laflour

"At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not
cease to be insipid." (c) Friedrich Nietzsche


"Prem Kumar" wrote:
Hi

Can somebody throw some light on what are these tools and which is the best
to use?

I would like to know, where do these tools fit in ? and how does it help?

Thanks
Prem
Sep 13 '06 #2
Hi

The link was useful. But however my very basic question is, since we are
working on SQL Server 2000, which is not an OORDMS, do these tools do any
better?

What is wrong in our existing way of doing things and why should we adopt to
this new ORM system ?

Also, i understand NHibernate would generate my CRUD statements and my table
in the database as a class, the question now is if i go on adding a new
field/removing a field in a table, where will this impact in the code base?

Can you tell me a problem/drawback which we had so that this could be
overcome by this new ORM approach?

Kindly help me by sending some links on ADO Entity framework, which you had
told about.

Prem

"Michael Nemtsev" wrote:
These tools are for the object-relation mapping.
Read about it there http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object-relational_mapping

What best to use is a bit arguing question. Apparently that is the best
suits u :)
But from the other perspective NHibernate is more popular, it's the .net
port of java hibernate version.
I'd recoment to look at ADO Entity Framework, if u are interesting in O/R
Mapping.
--
WBR,
Michael Nemtsev :: blog: http://spaces.msn.com/laflour

"At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not
cease to be insipid." (c) Friedrich Nietzsche


"Prem Kumar" wrote:
Hi

Can somebody throw some light on what are these tools and which is the best
to use?

I would like to know, where do these tools fit in ? and how does it help?

Thanks
Prem
Sep 13 '06 #3
I'm not a good expert in O/R mapping, thus can't help u in "where it really
necessary to use ORM and where's not"

ORM solves the conceptual problem. withour ORM everything u have is logical
and physical description. Conceptual layer helps developer to leverage
database data.

I recommend to read this article, where author describes where ORM doesnt help
http://www.nofluffjuststuff.com/blog...ssItemId=97550

ADO Entity Framework overview
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/d...displaylang=en

--
WBR,
Michael Nemtsev :: blog: http://spaces.msn.com/laflour

"At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not
cease to be insipid." (c) Friedrich Nietzsche


"Prem Kumar" wrote:
Hi

The link was useful. But however my very basic question is, since we are
working on SQL Server 2000, which is not an OORDMS, do these tools do any
better?

What is wrong in our existing way of doing things and why should we adopt to
this new ORM system ?

Also, i understand NHibernate would generate my CRUD statements and my table
in the database as a class, the question now is if i go on adding a new
field/removing a field in a table, where will this impact in the code base?

Can you tell me a problem/drawback which we had so that this could be
overcome by this new ORM approach?

Kindly help me by sending some links on ADO Entity framework, which you had
told about.

Prem

"Michael Nemtsev" wrote:
These tools are for the object-relation mapping.
Read about it there http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object-relational_mapping

What best to use is a bit arguing question. Apparently that is the best
suits u :)
But from the other perspective NHibernate is more popular, it's the .net
port of java hibernate version.
I'd recoment to look at ADO Entity Framework, if u are interesting in O/R
Mapping.
--
WBR,
Michael Nemtsev :: blog: http://spaces.msn.com/laflour

"At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not
cease to be insipid." (c) Friedrich Nietzsche


"Prem Kumar" wrote:
Hi
>
Can somebody throw some light on what are these tools and which is the best
to use?
>
I would like to know, where do these tools fit in ? and how does it help?
>
Thanks
Prem
Sep 13 '06 #4
Prem Kumar <Pr*******@discussions.microsoft.comwrote:
The link was useful. But however my very basic question is, since we are
working on SQL Server 2000, which is not an OORDMS, do these tools do any
better?
The whole point of ORM is to use a *non* OORDBMS in an OO way. If you
were already working with
What is wrong in our existing way of doing things and why should we adopt to
this new ORM system ?
Also, i understand NHibernate would generate my CRUD statements and my table
in the database as a class, the question now is if i go on adding a new
field/removing a field in a table, where will this impact in the code base?
In the mapping configuration and your domain object.
Can you tell me a problem/drawback which we had so that this could be
overcome by this new ORM approach?
You can express queries and all kinds of other information in a more OO
way. You can dynamically build up queries and let the ORM tool take
care of generating the appropriate SQL.

There are all kinds of benefits to ORM which would take too long to
describe here - I suggest you trawl the web for articles on ORM rather
than asking questions here (especially as those questions really aren't
anything to do with C#).

http://www.kuro5hin.org/story/2006/3/11/1001/81803 may give you more
information.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet Blog: http://www.msmvps.com/jon.skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Sep 13 '06 #5
Prem Kumar wrote:
The link was useful. But however my very basic question is, since we
are working on SQL Server 2000, which is not an OORDMS, do these
tools do any better?
What is wrong in our existing way of doing things and why should we
adopt to this new ORM system ?
It depends on how you want to work with data. Please read my article:
To O/R map or not to O/R map:
http://weblogs.asp.net/fbouma/archiv...09/240225.aspx

and also:
http://weblogs.asp.net/fbouma/archiv...0_-The-Databas
e-Model-is-the-Domain-Model.aspx

to get some more insight in what an entity class is and how it differs
from table-focused data-access.
Also, i understand NHibernate would generate my CRUD statements and
my table in the database as a class, the question now is if i go on
adding a new field/removing a field in a table, where will this
impact in the code base?
depends on the tool you're using. The O/R mapper I work on (see
signature, LLBLGen Pro) takes care of that.
Can you tell me a problem/drawback which we had so that this could be
overcome by this new ORM approach?
it should be taken care of in a proper toolkit.
Kindly help me by sending some links on ADO Entity framework, which
you had told about.
ADO.NET vNext isn't slated for release before H2 of 2007, and is far
from feature complete. So if you want to start working NOW, it's of no
use.

Frans

--
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Lead developer of LLBLGen Pro, the productive O/R mapper for .NET
LLBLGen Pro website: http://www.llblgen.com
My .NET blog: http://weblogs.asp.net/fbouma
Microsoft MVP (C#)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sep 14 '06 #6

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