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3-tier layers

P: n/a
Hello,

I try to understand how the business and presentation layers would
practically
translate into programming reality.
I read lots of articles about 3-tier, but none of them gave a practical
example
and I managed to understand the data layer only.
Is for example web services and their consumption an instance of n-tier,
covering the business and presentation layers?
If it is not necessary a WEB development how would the presentation and
business
layer come to life, through what? Is ASP the presentation layer and C# the
business layer?

Thanks a lot.
Apr 25 '06 #1
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25 Replies


P: n/a
The 3-tier model is based upon separation of general functionality. You have
3 tiers:

Interface
Business
Data

Each tier is more specific than the one below.

The Data Tier is only for working with underlying data stores. It knows
nothing of specific business rules about how to handle the data. It only
knows how to fetch it, change it, delete it, that sort of thing. It is a
programming interface to the data that any application stores. As such, it
is agnostic of any rules concerning what the data is, or how it is to be
treated. It is the "supply clerk" of the organization. This way it can be
used by many applications.

The Business Tier is for manipulating the data. It contains the Business
logic and Business rules that comprise the "engine" of an application. It
knows everything about the Data Tier, while the Data Tier knows nothing
about the Business Tier. The Business Tier works with Data, but does nothing
to expose it to a user. It does expose what is necessary for any other
component or application to be able to work with the data, and is in charge
of making sure that everything is handled according to the Business rules.
It has a programming interface, but no user interface. This way, the
functionality of the Business tier can be used in many different types of
interfaces.

The User Interface is the most specific. It knows nothing about the Data
Tier; that is the Business Tier's job. It knows everything about the exposed
API of the Business tier, and its job is to present the data to the user,
and to take input from the User and relay it to the Business Tier. It is a
"universal translator" for the application, which speaks human at one end,
and business API at the other.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ua**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
Hello,

I try to understand how the business and presentation layers would
practically
translate into programming reality.
I read lots of articles about 3-tier, but none of them gave a practical
example
and I managed to understand the data layer only.
Is for example web services and their consumption an instance of n-tier,
covering the business and presentation layers?
If it is not necessary a WEB development how would the presentation and
business
layer come to life, through what? Is ASP the presentation layer and C#
the business layer?

Thanks a lot.

Apr 25 '06 #2

P: n/a
I'd add that each tier should be allowed to be physically seperated as
well. All the tiers can operate on seperate servers / workstations.

Apr 25 '06 #3

P: n/a
Thanks for replying,
I was looking more for a description of how the business layer can be
expressed: a DLL,
a COM object, a WEB service?
Theoretically I understand the concept, but the practical side is difficult
for me to grab.
As I see it WEB services would solve the business layer, but what's used
when the application is Windows based?

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:OV**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
The 3-tier model is based upon separation of general functionality. You
have 3 tiers:

Interface
Business
Data

Each tier is more specific than the one below.

The Data Tier is only for working with underlying data stores. It knows
nothing of specific business rules about how to handle the data. It only
knows how to fetch it, change it, delete it, that sort of thing. It is a
programming interface to the data that any application stores. As such, it
is agnostic of any rules concerning what the data is, or how it is to be
treated. It is the "supply clerk" of the organization. This way it can be
used by many applications.

The Business Tier is for manipulating the data. It contains the Business
logic and Business rules that comprise the "engine" of an application. It
knows everything about the Data Tier, while the Data Tier knows nothing
about the Business Tier. The Business Tier works with Data, but does
nothing to expose it to a user. It does expose what is necessary for any
other component or application to be able to work with the data, and is in
charge of making sure that everything is handled according to the Business
rules. It has a programming interface, but no user interface. This way,
the functionality of the Business tier can be used in many different types
of interfaces.

The User Interface is the most specific. It knows nothing about the Data
Tier; that is the Business Tier's job. It knows everything about the
exposed API of the Business tier, and its job is to present the data to
the user, and to take input from the User and relay it to the Business
Tier. It is a "universal translator" for the application, which speaks
human at one end, and business API at the other.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ua**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
Hello,

I try to understand how the business and presentation layers would
practically
translate into programming reality.
I read lots of articles about 3-tier, but none of them gave a practical
example
and I managed to understand the data layer only.
Is for example web services and their consumption an instance of n-tier,
covering the business and presentation layers?
If it is not necessary a WEB development how would the presentation and
business
layer come to life, through what? Is ASP the presentation layer and C#
the business layer?

Thanks a lot.


Apr 25 '06 #4

P: n/a
If you are working in .NET 2.0, you'll want to become familiar
with Generics. There are ways to make the different layers
see only portions of your classes so as not to violate
certain design principles.

http://www.eggheadcafe.com/articles/...ion_layers.asp

--
Robbe Morris - 2004-2006 Microsoft MVP C#
Earn money answering .NET questions
http://www.eggheadcafe.com/forums/merit.asp

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ua**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
Hello,

I try to understand how the business and presentation layers would
practically
translate into programming reality.
I read lots of articles about 3-tier, but none of them gave a practical
example
and I managed to understand the data layer only.
Is for example web services and their consumption an instance of n-tier,
covering the business and presentation layers?
If it is not necessary a WEB development how would the presentation and
business
layer come to life, through what? Is ASP the presentation layer and C#
the business layer?

Thanks a lot.

Apr 25 '06 #5

P: n/a
A Web Service is an interface. It is a form of presentation tier. It exposes
the API of a set of business classes. A Business tier is a set of classes. A
DLL is a container for code. A COM object isn't even .Net. A Data Tier is
also a set of classes. The classes can reside in one or more assemblies. An
assembly is stored in one or more DLLs.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Oy**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
Thanks for replying,
I was looking more for a description of how the business layer can be
expressed: a DLL,
a COM object, a WEB service?
Theoretically I understand the concept, but the practical side is
difficult for me to grab.
As I see it WEB services would solve the business layer, but what's used
when the application is Windows based?

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:OV**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
The 3-tier model is based upon separation of general functionality. You
have 3 tiers:

Interface
Business
Data

Each tier is more specific than the one below.

The Data Tier is only for working with underlying data stores. It knows
nothing of specific business rules about how to handle the data. It only
knows how to fetch it, change it, delete it, that sort of thing. It is a
programming interface to the data that any application stores. As such,
it is agnostic of any rules concerning what the data is, or how it is to
be treated. It is the "supply clerk" of the organization. This way it can
be used by many applications.

The Business Tier is for manipulating the data. It contains the Business
logic and Business rules that comprise the "engine" of an application. It
knows everything about the Data Tier, while the Data Tier knows nothing
about the Business Tier. The Business Tier works with Data, but does
nothing to expose it to a user. It does expose what is necessary for any
other component or application to be able to work with the data, and is
in charge of making sure that everything is handled according to the
Business rules. It has a programming interface, but no user interface.
This way, the functionality of the Business tier can be used in many
different types of interfaces.

The User Interface is the most specific. It knows nothing about the Data
Tier; that is the Business Tier's job. It knows everything about the
exposed API of the Business tier, and its job is to present the data to
the user, and to take input from the User and relay it to the Business
Tier. It is a "universal translator" for the application, which speaks
human at one end, and business API at the other.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ua**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
Hello,

I try to understand how the business and presentation layers would
practically
translate into programming reality.
I read lots of articles about 3-tier, but none of them gave a practical
example
and I managed to understand the data layer only.
Is for example web services and their consumption an instance of n-tier,
covering the business and presentation layers?
If it is not necessary a WEB development how would the presentation and
business
layer come to life, through what? Is ASP the presentation layer and C#
the business layer?

Thanks a lot.



Apr 26 '06 #6

P: n/a
Nicely put Kevin.

--
William Stacey [MVP]

....
Apr 26 '06 #7

P: n/a
Thanks Kevin,
Couldn't be a WEB service considered a business layer as long as it is a
class with different methods and the application that makes a reference
becomes a presentation layer?
I can create a service on a separate server for example, where I can put all
the business logic in it, but it does not have a presentation until I create
an application on another server (that makes a reference to the service)
which uses controls for the user input.
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:Ox**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
A Web Service is an interface. It is a form of presentation tier. It
exposes the API of a set of business classes. A Business tier is a set of
classes. A DLL is a container for code. A COM object isn't even .Net. A
Data Tier is also a set of classes. The classes can reside in one or more
assemblies. An assembly is stored in one or more DLLs.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Oy**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
Thanks for replying,
I was looking more for a description of how the business layer can be
expressed: a DLL,
a COM object, a WEB service?
Theoretically I understand the concept, but the practical side is
difficult for me to grab.
As I see it WEB services would solve the business layer, but what's used
when the application is Windows based?

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:OV**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
The 3-tier model is based upon separation of general functionality. You
have 3 tiers:

Interface
Business
Data

Each tier is more specific than the one below.

The Data Tier is only for working with underlying data stores. It knows
nothing of specific business rules about how to handle the data. It only
knows how to fetch it, change it, delete it, that sort of thing. It is a
programming interface to the data that any application stores. As such,
it is agnostic of any rules concerning what the data is, or how it is to
be treated. It is the "supply clerk" of the organization. This way it
can be used by many applications.

The Business Tier is for manipulating the data. It contains the Business
logic and Business rules that comprise the "engine" of an application.
It knows everything about the Data Tier, while the Data Tier knows
nothing about the Business Tier. The Business Tier works with Data, but
does nothing to expose it to a user. It does expose what is necessary
for any other component or application to be able to work with the data,
and is in charge of making sure that everything is handled according to
the Business rules. It has a programming interface, but no user
interface. This way, the functionality of the Business tier can be used
in many different types of interfaces.

The User Interface is the most specific. It knows nothing about the Data
Tier; that is the Business Tier's job. It knows everything about the
exposed API of the Business tier, and its job is to present the data to
the user, and to take input from the User and relay it to the Business
Tier. It is a "universal translator" for the application, which speaks
human at one end, and business API at the other.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ua**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
Hello,

I try to understand how the business and presentation layers would
practically
translate into programming reality.
I read lots of articles about 3-tier, but none of them gave a practical
example
and I managed to understand the data layer only.
Is for example web services and their consumption an instance of
n-tier,
covering the business and presentation layers?
If it is not necessary a WEB development how would the presentation and
business
layer come to life, through what? Is ASP the presentation layer and C#
the business layer?

Thanks a lot.



Apr 26 '06 #8

P: n/a
The business layer is usually just an assembly dll used directly. If
you have functionality of the business layer you need to expose to
untrusted sources (such as partner companies, etc), you usually build a
facade layer to communicate with the business layer. The facade layer
could be a web service.

A web service should not be the business layer though; the web service
should be just another 'UI' to the business layer. that way you could
use the business layer in a windows forms application (and wouldn't
need to go throuh a web service).

Apr 26 '06 #9

P: n/a
If you put your business logic into a Web Service, you have bound the API
for that business logic to a Web Service interface. The Web Service itself
is an interface, but not a programming interface, strictly. Not a good idea,
since there is latency involved, and severe restrictions on the interface
itself. Everything passed through it must be serialized as XML.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
Thanks Kevin,
Couldn't be a WEB service considered a business layer as long as it is a
class with different methods and the application that makes a reference
becomes a presentation layer?
I can create a service on a separate server for example, where I can put
all the business logic in it, but it does not have a presentation until I
create an application on another server (that makes a reference to the
service) which uses controls for the user input.
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:Ox**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
A Web Service is an interface. It is a form of presentation tier. It
exposes the API of a set of business classes. A Business tier is a set of
classes. A DLL is a container for code. A COM object isn't even .Net. A
Data Tier is also a set of classes. The classes can reside in one or more
assemblies. An assembly is stored in one or more DLLs.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Oy**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
Thanks for replying,
I was looking more for a description of how the business layer can be
expressed: a DLL,
a COM object, a WEB service?
Theoretically I understand the concept, but the practical side is
difficult for me to grab.
As I see it WEB services would solve the business layer, but what's used
when the application is Windows based?

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:OV**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
The 3-tier model is based upon separation of general functionality. You
have 3 tiers:

Interface
Business
Data

Each tier is more specific than the one below.

The Data Tier is only for working with underlying data stores. It knows
nothing of specific business rules about how to handle the data. It
only knows how to fetch it, change it, delete it, that sort of thing.
It is a programming interface to the data that any application stores.
As such, it is agnostic of any rules concerning what the data is, or
how it is to be treated. It is the "supply clerk" of the organization.
This way it can be used by many applications.

The Business Tier is for manipulating the data. It contains the
Business logic and Business rules that comprise the "engine" of an
application. It knows everything about the Data Tier, while the Data
Tier knows nothing about the Business Tier. The Business Tier works
with Data, but does nothing to expose it to a user. It does expose what
is necessary for any other component or application to be able to work
with the data, and is in charge of making sure that everything is
handled according to the Business rules. It has a programming
interface, but no user interface. This way, the functionality of the
Business tier can be used in many different types of interfaces.

The User Interface is the most specific. It knows nothing about the
Data Tier; that is the Business Tier's job. It knows everything about
the exposed API of the Business tier, and its job is to present the
data to the user, and to take input from the User and relay it to the
Business Tier. It is a "universal translator" for the application,
which speaks human at one end, and business API at the other.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ua**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
> Hello,
>
> I try to understand how the business and presentation layers would
> practically
> translate into programming reality.
> I read lots of articles about 3-tier, but none of them gave a
> practical example
> and I managed to understand the data layer only.
> Is for example web services and their consumption an instance of
> n-tier,
> covering the business and presentation layers?
> If it is not necessary a WEB development how would the presentation
> and business
> layer come to life, through what? Is ASP the presentation layer and
> C# the business layer?
>
> Thanks a lot.
>



Apr 26 '06 #10

P: n/a
A web service is more of a service and the contract shouldn't change
much.

If you build a business layer as a web service and then need to change
the business object model, you'll force everyone that consumes your web
service to update thier code. The web service should just be an
interface to the business objects. That way your web services don't
necessarly need to change if you change the business logic.

Apr 26 '06 #11

P: n/a
So the solution is to create Class Library projects to keep the business
layer?
Sorry, I am new to C# too.

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:OB**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
If you put your business logic into a Web Service, you have bound the API
for that business logic to a Web Service interface. The Web Service itself
is an interface, but not a programming interface, strictly. Not a good
idea, since there is latency involved, and severe restrictions on the
interface itself. Everything passed through it must be serialized as XML.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
Thanks Kevin,
Couldn't be a WEB service considered a business layer as long as it is a
class with different methods and the application that makes a reference
becomes a presentation layer?
I can create a service on a separate server for example, where I can put
all the business logic in it, but it does not have a presentation until I
create an application on another server (that makes a reference to the
service) which uses controls for the user input.
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:Ox**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
A Web Service is an interface. It is a form of presentation tier. It
exposes the API of a set of business classes. A Business tier is a set of
classes. A DLL is a container for code. A COM object isn't even .Net. A
Data Tier is also a set of classes. The classes can reside in one or more
assemblies. An assembly is stored in one or more DLLs.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Oy**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
Thanks for replying,
I was looking more for a description of how the business layer can be
expressed: a DLL,
a COM object, a WEB service?
Theoretically I understand the concept, but the practical side is
difficult for me to grab.
As I see it WEB services would solve the business layer, but what's
used when the application is Windows based?

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:OV**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
> The 3-tier model is based upon separation of general functionality.
> You have 3 tiers:
>
> Interface
> Business
> Data
>
> Each tier is more specific than the one below.
>
> The Data Tier is only for working with underlying data stores. It
> knows nothing of specific business rules about how to handle the data.
> It only knows how to fetch it, change it, delete it, that sort of
> thing. It is a programming interface to the data that any application
> stores. As such, it is agnostic of any rules concerning what the data
> is, or how it is to be treated. It is the "supply clerk" of the
> organization. This way it can be used by many applications.
>
> The Business Tier is for manipulating the data. It contains the
> Business logic and Business rules that comprise the "engine" of an
> application. It knows everything about the Data Tier, while the Data
> Tier knows nothing about the Business Tier. The Business Tier works
> with Data, but does nothing to expose it to a user. It does expose
> what is necessary for any other component or application to be able to
> work with the data, and is in charge of making sure that everything is
> handled according to the Business rules. It has a programming
> interface, but no user interface. This way, the functionality of the
> Business tier can be used in many different types of interfaces.
>
> The User Interface is the most specific. It knows nothing about the
> Data Tier; that is the Business Tier's job. It knows everything about
> the exposed API of the Business tier, and its job is to present the
> data to the user, and to take input from the User and relay it to the
> Business Tier. It is a "universal translator" for the application,
> which speaks human at one end, and business API at the other.
>
> --
> HTH,
>
> Kevin Spencer
> Microsoft MVP
> Professional Numbskull
>
> Hard work is a medication for which
> there is no placebo.
>
> "Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:ua**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>> Hello,
>>
>> I try to understand how the business and presentation layers would
>> practically
>> translate into programming reality.
>> I read lots of articles about 3-tier, but none of them gave a
>> practical example
>> and I managed to understand the data layer only.
>> Is for example web services and their consumption an instance of
>> n-tier,
>> covering the business and presentation layers?
>> If it is not necessary a WEB development how would the presentation
>> and business
>> layer come to life, through what? Is ASP the presentation layer and
>> C# the business layer?
>>
>> Thanks a lot.
>>
>
>



Apr 26 '06 #12

P: n/a
Yes, business classes would be in class libraries.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:e2**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
So the solution is to create Class Library projects to keep the business
layer?
Sorry, I am new to C# too.

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:OB**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
If you put your business logic into a Web Service, you have bound the API
for that business logic to a Web Service interface. The Web Service
itself is an interface, but not a programming interface, strictly. Not a
good idea, since there is latency involved, and severe restrictions on
the interface itself. Everything passed through it must be serialized as
XML.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
Thanks Kevin,
Couldn't be a WEB service considered a business layer as long as it is a
class with different methods and the application that makes a reference
becomes a presentation layer?
I can create a service on a separate server for example, where I can put
all the business logic in it, but it does not have a presentation until
I create an application on another server (that makes a reference to the
service) which uses controls for the user input.
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:Ox**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
A Web Service is an interface. It is a form of presentation tier. It
exposes the API of a set of business classes. A Business tier is a set
of classes. A DLL is a container for code. A COM object isn't even .Net.
A Data Tier is also a set of classes. The classes can reside in one or
more assemblies. An assembly is stored in one or more DLLs.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Oy**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
> Thanks for replying,
> I was looking more for a description of how the business layer can be
> expressed: a DLL,
> a COM object, a WEB service?
> Theoretically I understand the concept, but the practical side is
> difficult for me to grab.
> As I see it WEB services would solve the business layer, but what's
> used when the application is Windows based?
>
> "Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
> news:OV**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>> The 3-tier model is based upon separation of general functionality.
>> You have 3 tiers:
>>
>> Interface
>> Business
>> Data
>>
>> Each tier is more specific than the one below.
>>
>> The Data Tier is only for working with underlying data stores. It
>> knows nothing of specific business rules about how to handle the
>> data. It only knows how to fetch it, change it, delete it, that sort
>> of thing. It is a programming interface to the data that any
>> application stores. As such, it is agnostic of any rules concerning
>> what the data is, or how it is to be treated. It is the "supply
>> clerk" of the organization. This way it can be used by many
>> applications.
>>
>> The Business Tier is for manipulating the data. It contains the
>> Business logic and Business rules that comprise the "engine" of an
>> application. It knows everything about the Data Tier, while the Data
>> Tier knows nothing about the Business Tier. The Business Tier works
>> with Data, but does nothing to expose it to a user. It does expose
>> what is necessary for any other component or application to be able
>> to work with the data, and is in charge of making sure that
>> everything is handled according to the Business rules. It has a
>> programming interface, but no user interface. This way, the
>> functionality of the Business tier can be used in many different
>> types of interfaces.
>>
>> The User Interface is the most specific. It knows nothing about the
>> Data Tier; that is the Business Tier's job. It knows everything about
>> the exposed API of the Business tier, and its job is to present the
>> data to the user, and to take input from the User and relay it to the
>> Business Tier. It is a "universal translator" for the application,
>> which speaks human at one end, and business API at the other.
>>
>> --
>> HTH,
>>
>> Kevin Spencer
>> Microsoft MVP
>> Professional Numbskull
>>
>> Hard work is a medication for which
>> there is no placebo.
>>
>> "Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:ua**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>>> Hello,
>>>
>>> I try to understand how the business and presentation layers would
>>> practically
>>> translate into programming reality.
>>> I read lots of articles about 3-tier, but none of them gave a
>>> practical example
>>> and I managed to understand the data layer only.
>>> Is for example web services and their consumption an instance of
>>> n-tier,
>>> covering the business and presentation layers?
>>> If it is not necessary a WEB development how would the presentation
>>> and business
>>> layer come to life, through what? Is ASP the presentation layer and
>>> C# the business layer?
>>>
>>> Thanks a lot.
>>>
>>
>>
>
>



Apr 26 '06 #13

P: n/a
Yup.

There's a great book which builds a framework for business objects to
help promote proper seperation of tiers.

Pick up a copy of Expert C# 2005 Business Objects by Rockford Lhotka,
published by APress.

HTH
Andy

Apr 26 '06 #14

P: n/a
Thanks.
I just created a shared assembly in a Class Library.
I used the sn -k obj\release\MyShared.snk to create a signature.
Then I used the MyShared.snk in the AssemblyInfo.cs file, in the
[assembly: AssemblyKeyFile("MyShared.snk ")]

section. Then I Rebuilt the solution. Next step was to install the assembly
using

gacutil /i MyShared.dll.

What would be next? I tried to create another project and then use the
reference to

find the MyShared.dll in there but it isn't. What did I do wrong?

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:uc*************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
Yes, business classes would be in class libraries.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:e2**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
So the solution is to create Class Library projects to keep the business
layer?
Sorry, I am new to C# too.

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:OB**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
If you put your business logic into a Web Service, you have bound the
API for that business logic to a Web Service interface. The Web Service
itself is an interface, but not a programming interface, strictly. Not a
good idea, since there is latency involved, and severe restrictions on
the interface itself. Everything passed through it must be serialized as
XML.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
Thanks Kevin,
Couldn't be a WEB service considered a business layer as long as it is
a class with different methods and the application that makes a
reference becomes a presentation layer?
I can create a service on a separate server for example, where I can
put all the business logic in it, but it does not have a presentation
until I create an application on another server (that makes a reference
to the service) which uses controls for the user input.
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:Ox**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>A Web Service is an interface. It is a form of presentation tier. It
>exposes the API of a set of business classes. A Business tier is a set
>of classes. A DLL is a container for code. A COM object isn't even
>.Net. A Data Tier is also a set of classes. The classes can reside in
>one or more assemblies. An assembly is stored in one or more DLLs.
>
> --
> HTH,
>
> Kevin Spencer
> Microsoft MVP
> Professional Numbskull
>
> Hard work is a medication for which
> there is no placebo.
>
> "Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:Oy**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>> Thanks for replying,
>> I was looking more for a description of how the business layer can be
>> expressed: a DLL,
>> a COM object, a WEB service?
>> Theoretically I understand the concept, but the practical side is
>> difficult for me to grab.
>> As I see it WEB services would solve the business layer, but what's
>> used when the application is Windows based?
>>
>> "Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
>> news:OV**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>>> The 3-tier model is based upon separation of general functionality.
>>> You have 3 tiers:
>>>
>>> Interface
>>> Business
>>> Data
>>>
>>> Each tier is more specific than the one below.
>>>
>>> The Data Tier is only for working with underlying data stores. It
>>> knows nothing of specific business rules about how to handle the
>>> data. It only knows how to fetch it, change it, delete it, that sort
>>> of thing. It is a programming interface to the data that any
>>> application stores. As such, it is agnostic of any rules concerning
>>> what the data is, or how it is to be treated. It is the "supply
>>> clerk" of the organization. This way it can be used by many
>>> applications.
>>>
>>> The Business Tier is for manipulating the data. It contains the
>>> Business logic and Business rules that comprise the "engine" of an
>>> application. It knows everything about the Data Tier, while the Data
>>> Tier knows nothing about the Business Tier. The Business Tier works
>>> with Data, but does nothing to expose it to a user. It does expose
>>> what is necessary for any other component or application to be able
>>> to work with the data, and is in charge of making sure that
>>> everything is handled according to the Business rules. It has a
>>> programming interface, but no user interface. This way, the
>>> functionality of the Business tier can be used in many different
>>> types of interfaces.
>>>
>>> The User Interface is the most specific. It knows nothing about the
>>> Data Tier; that is the Business Tier's job. It knows everything
>>> about the exposed API of the Business tier, and its job is to
>>> present the data to the user, and to take input from the User and
>>> relay it to the Business Tier. It is a "universal translator" for
>>> the application, which speaks human at one end, and business API at
>>> the other.
>>>
>>> --
>>> HTH,
>>>
>>> Kevin Spencer
>>> Microsoft MVP
>>> Professional Numbskull
>>>
>>> Hard work is a medication for which
>>> there is no placebo.
>>>
>>> "Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>>> news:ua**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>>>> Hello,
>>>>
>>>> I try to understand how the business and presentation layers would
>>>> practically
>>>> translate into programming reality.
>>>> I read lots of articles about 3-tier, but none of them gave a
>>>> practical example
>>>> and I managed to understand the data layer only.
>>>> Is for example web services and their consumption an instance of
>>>> n-tier,
>>>> covering the business and presentation layers?
>>>> If it is not necessary a WEB development how would the presentation
>>>> and business
>>>> layer come to life, through what? Is ASP the presentation layer
>>>> and C# the business layer?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks a lot.
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>



Apr 26 '06 #15

P: n/a
Well, to start with, you didn't need to create a shared assembly. You didn't
need to create a Strong Name for the assembly. You didn't need to install it
in the GAC.

Create a project for your business class library. Don't change any settings,
just use the default template that Visual Studio provides. It is the default
because it is the typical way that class libaries are made. When you need to
use the Business class in another project, add the project to that solution.
You can add the same project to any number of solutions. Then create a
reference to the project is the other project. Bob's your uncle.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ex*************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
Thanks.
I just created a shared assembly in a Class Library.
I used the sn -k obj\release\MyShared.snk to create a signature.
Then I used the MyShared.snk in the AssemblyInfo.cs file, in the
[assembly: AssemblyKeyFile("MyShared.snk ")]

section. Then I Rebuilt the solution. Next step was to install the
assembly using

gacutil /i MyShared.dll.

What would be next? I tried to create another project and then use the
reference to

find the MyShared.dll in there but it isn't. What did I do wrong?

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:uc*************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
Yes, business classes would be in class libraries.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:e2**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
So the solution is to create Class Library projects to keep the business
layer?
Sorry, I am new to C# too.

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:OB**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
If you put your business logic into a Web Service, you have bound the
API for that business logic to a Web Service interface. The Web Service
itself is an interface, but not a programming interface, strictly. Not
a good idea, since there is latency involved, and severe restrictions
on the interface itself. Everything passed through it must be
serialized as XML.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
> Thanks Kevin,
> Couldn't be a WEB service considered a business layer as long as it is
> a class with different methods and the application that makes a
> reference becomes a presentation layer?
> I can create a service on a separate server for example, where I can
> put all the business logic in it, but it does not have a presentation
> until I create an application on another server (that makes a
> reference to the service) which uses controls for the user input.
>
>
> "Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
> news:Ox**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>A Web Service is an interface. It is a form of presentation tier. It
>>exposes the API of a set of business classes. A Business tier is a set
>>of classes. A DLL is a container for code. A COM object isn't even
>>.Net. A Data Tier is also a set of classes. The classes can reside in
>>one or more assemblies. An assembly is stored in one or more DLLs.
>>
>> --
>> HTH,
>>
>> Kevin Spencer
>> Microsoft MVP
>> Professional Numbskull
>>
>> Hard work is a medication for which
>> there is no placebo.
>>
>> "Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:Oy**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>>> Thanks for replying,
>>> I was looking more for a description of how the business layer can
>>> be expressed: a DLL,
>>> a COM object, a WEB service?
>>> Theoretically I understand the concept, but the practical side is
>>> difficult for me to grab.
>>> As I see it WEB services would solve the business layer, but what's
>>> used when the application is Windows based?
>>>
>>> "Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
>>> news:OV**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>>>> The 3-tier model is based upon separation of general functionality.
>>>> You have 3 tiers:
>>>>
>>>> Interface
>>>> Business
>>>> Data
>>>>
>>>> Each tier is more specific than the one below.
>>>>
>>>> The Data Tier is only for working with underlying data stores. It
>>>> knows nothing of specific business rules about how to handle the
>>>> data. It only knows how to fetch it, change it, delete it, that
>>>> sort of thing. It is a programming interface to the data that any
>>>> application stores. As such, it is agnostic of any rules concerning
>>>> what the data is, or how it is to be treated. It is the "supply
>>>> clerk" of the organization. This way it can be used by many
>>>> applications.
>>>>
>>>> The Business Tier is for manipulating the data. It contains the
>>>> Business logic and Business rules that comprise the "engine" of an
>>>> application. It knows everything about the Data Tier, while the
>>>> Data Tier knows nothing about the Business Tier. The Business Tier
>>>> works with Data, but does nothing to expose it to a user. It does
>>>> expose what is necessary for any other component or application to
>>>> be able to work with the data, and is in charge of making sure that
>>>> everything is handled according to the Business rules. It has a
>>>> programming interface, but no user interface. This way, the
>>>> functionality of the Business tier can be used in many different
>>>> types of interfaces.
>>>>
>>>> The User Interface is the most specific. It knows nothing about the
>>>> Data Tier; that is the Business Tier's job. It knows everything
>>>> about the exposed API of the Business tier, and its job is to
>>>> present the data to the user, and to take input from the User and
>>>> relay it to the Business Tier. It is a "universal translator" for
>>>> the application, which speaks human at one end, and business API at
>>>> the other.
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> HTH,
>>>>
>>>> Kevin Spencer
>>>> Microsoft MVP
>>>> Professional Numbskull
>>>>
>>>> Hard work is a medication for which
>>>> there is no placebo.
>>>>
>>>> "Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:ua**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>>>>> Hello,
>>>>>
>>>>> I try to understand how the business and presentation layers would
>>>>> practically
>>>>> translate into programming reality.
>>>>> I read lots of articles about 3-tier, but none of them gave a
>>>>> practical example
>>>>> and I managed to understand the data layer only.
>>>>> Is for example web services and their consumption an instance of
>>>>> n-tier,
>>>>> covering the business and presentation layers?
>>>>> If it is not necessary a WEB development how would the
>>>>> presentation and business
>>>>> layer come to life, through what? Is ASP the presentation layer
>>>>> and C# the business layer?
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks a lot.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>



Apr 26 '06 #16

P: n/a
Thanks a lot
When do I need it in GAC?

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:uh*************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
Well, to start with, you didn't need to create a shared assembly. You
didn't need to create a Strong Name for the assembly. You didn't need to
install it in the GAC.

Create a project for your business class library. Don't change any
settings, just use the default template that Visual Studio provides. It is
the default because it is the typical way that class libaries are made.
When you need to use the Business class in another project, add the
project to that solution. You can add the same project to any number of
solutions. Then create a reference to the project is the other project.
Bob's your uncle.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ex*************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
Thanks.
I just created a shared assembly in a Class Library.
I used the sn -k obj\release\MyShared.snk to create a signature.
Then I used the MyShared.snk in the AssemblyInfo.cs file, in the
[assembly: AssemblyKeyFile("MyShared.snk ")]

section. Then I Rebuilt the solution. Next step was to install the
assembly using

gacutil /i MyShared.dll.

What would be next? I tried to create another project and then use the
reference to

find the MyShared.dll in there but it isn't. What did I do wrong?

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:uc*************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
Yes, business classes would be in class libraries.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:e2**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
So the solution is to create Class Library projects to keep the
business layer?
Sorry, I am new to C# too.

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:OB**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
> If you put your business logic into a Web Service, you have bound the
> API for that business logic to a Web Service interface. The Web
> Service itself is an interface, but not a programming interface,
> strictly. Not a good idea, since there is latency involved, and severe
> restrictions on the interface itself. Everything passed through it
> must be serialized as XML.
>
> --
> HTH,
>
> Kevin Spencer
> Microsoft MVP
> Professional Numbskull
>
> Hard work is a medication for which
> there is no placebo.
>
> "Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>> Thanks Kevin,
>> Couldn't be a WEB service considered a business layer as long as it
>> is a class with different methods and the application that makes a
>> reference becomes a presentation layer?
>> I can create a service on a separate server for example, where I can
>> put all the business logic in it, but it does not have a presentation
>> until I create an application on another server (that makes a
>> reference to the service) which uses controls for the user input.
>>
>>
>> "Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
>> news:Ox**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>>A Web Service is an interface. It is a form of presentation tier. It
>>>exposes the API of a set of business classes. A Business tier is a
>>>set of classes. A DLL is a container for code. A COM object isn't
>>>even .Net. A Data Tier is also a set of classes. The classes can
>>>reside in one or more assemblies. An assembly is stored in one or
>>>more DLLs.
>>>
>>> --
>>> HTH,
>>>
>>> Kevin Spencer
>>> Microsoft MVP
>>> Professional Numbskull
>>>
>>> Hard work is a medication for which
>>> there is no placebo.
>>>
>>> "Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>>> news:Oy**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>>>> Thanks for replying,
>>>> I was looking more for a description of how the business layer can
>>>> be expressed: a DLL,
>>>> a COM object, a WEB service?
>>>> Theoretically I understand the concept, but the practical side is
>>>> difficult for me to grab.
>>>> As I see it WEB services would solve the business layer, but what's
>>>> used when the application is Windows based?
>>>>
>>>> "Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:OV**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>>>>> The 3-tier model is based upon separation of general
>>>>> functionality. You have 3 tiers:
>>>>>
>>>>> Interface
>>>>> Business
>>>>> Data
>>>>>
>>>>> Each tier is more specific than the one below.
>>>>>
>>>>> The Data Tier is only for working with underlying data stores. It
>>>>> knows nothing of specific business rules about how to handle the
>>>>> data. It only knows how to fetch it, change it, delete it, that
>>>>> sort of thing. It is a programming interface to the data that any
>>>>> application stores. As such, it is agnostic of any rules
>>>>> concerning what the data is, or how it is to be treated. It is the
>>>>> "supply clerk" of the organization. This way it can be used by
>>>>> many applications.
>>>>>
>>>>> The Business Tier is for manipulating the data. It contains the
>>>>> Business logic and Business rules that comprise the "engine" of an
>>>>> application. It knows everything about the Data Tier, while the
>>>>> Data Tier knows nothing about the Business Tier. The Business Tier
>>>>> works with Data, but does nothing to expose it to a user. It does
>>>>> expose what is necessary for any other component or application to
>>>>> be able to work with the data, and is in charge of making sure
>>>>> that everything is handled according to the Business rules. It has
>>>>> a programming interface, but no user interface. This way, the
>>>>> functionality of the Business tier can be used in many different
>>>>> types of interfaces.
>>>>>
>>>>> The User Interface is the most specific. It knows nothing about
>>>>> the Data Tier; that is the Business Tier's job. It knows
>>>>> everything about the exposed API of the Business tier, and its job
>>>>> is to present the data to the user, and to take input from the
>>>>> User and relay it to the Business Tier. It is a "universal
>>>>> translator" for the application, which speaks human at one end,
>>>>> and business API at the other.
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> HTH,
>>>>>
>>>>> Kevin Spencer
>>>>> Microsoft MVP
>>>>> Professional Numbskull
>>>>>
>>>>> Hard work is a medication for which
>>>>> there is no placebo.
>>>>>
>>>>> "Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>>>>> news:ua**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>>>>>> Hello,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I try to understand how the business and presentation layers
>>>>>> would practically
>>>>>> translate into programming reality.
>>>>>> I read lots of articles about 3-tier, but none of them gave a
>>>>>> practical example
>>>>>> and I managed to understand the data layer only.
>>>>>> Is for example web services and their consumption an instance of
>>>>>> n-tier,
>>>>>> covering the business and presentation layers?
>>>>>> If it is not necessary a WEB development how would the
>>>>>> presentation and business
>>>>>> layer come to life, through what? Is ASP the presentation layer
>>>>>> and C# the business layer?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Thanks a lot.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>



Apr 26 '06 #17

P: n/a
Most likely never. The GAC is really for assemblies that would be
shared across many applications.

I'd say just pretend installing to the GAC isn't even an option. Thats
the standard way to use libraries.

Apr 26 '06 #18

P: n/a
Thanks Andy.
In my situation when I registered my class in GAC, how can I make it visible
to another application?
"Andy" <aj*****@alum.rit.edu> wrote in message
news:11**********************@v46g2000cwv.googlegr oups.com...
Most likely never. The GAC is really for assemblies that would be
shared across many applications.

I'd say just pretend installing to the GAC isn't even an option. Thats
the standard way to use libraries.

Apr 26 '06 #19

P: n/a
That would be done by modifying the system registry.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:OC****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
Thanks Andy.
In my situation when I registered my class in GAC, how can I make it
visible to another application?
"Andy" <aj*****@alum.rit.edu> wrote in message
news:11**********************@v46g2000cwv.googlegr oups.com...
Most likely never. The GAC is really for assemblies that would be
shared across many applications.

I'd say just pretend installing to the GAC isn't even an option. Thats
the standard way to use libraries.


Apr 26 '06 #20

P: n/a
You need to add a reference in the to the assembly in the project.

But you can add a reference to your assembly even if its not in the GAC.

Apr 26 '06 #21

P: n/a
It seems to be a too complicated procedure.
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
That would be done by modifying the system registry.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:OC****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
Thanks Andy.
In my situation when I registered my class in GAC, how can I make it
visible to another application?
"Andy" <aj*****@alum.rit.edu> wrote in message
news:11**********************@v46g2000cwv.googlegr oups.com...
Most likely never. The GAC is really for assemblies that would be
shared across many applications.

I'd say just pretend installing to the GAC isn't even an option. Thats
the standard way to use libraries.



Apr 26 '06 #22

P: n/a
That's what I tried, to add a reference, but in the .NET tab it does not
show at all.
"Andy" <aj*****@alum.rit.edu> wrote in message
news:11**********************@e56g2000cwe.googlegr oups.com...
You need to add a reference in the to the assembly in the project.

But you can add a reference to your assembly even if its not in the GAC.

Apr 26 '06 #23

P: n/a
Well, Dan, as you've been told, it isn't necessary to put most assemblies in
the GAC. I have never had to myself, and I've written quite a few.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
It seems to be a too complicated procedure.
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
That would be done by modifying the system registry.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
Professional Numbskull

Hard work is a medication for which
there is no placebo.

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:OC****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
Thanks Andy.
In my situation when I registered my class in GAC, how can I make it
visible to another application?
"Andy" <aj*****@alum.rit.edu> wrote in message
news:11**********************@v46g2000cwv.googlegr oups.com...
Most likely never. The GAC is really for assemblies that would be
shared across many applications.

I'd say just pretend installing to the GAC isn't even an option. Thats
the standard way to use libraries.



Apr 27 '06 #24

P: n/a
You have to browse for it.

Apr 27 '06 #25

P: n/a
Hi Dean,

The best way to learn about n-tier & SOA architectures is through research
and experimentation.

Adhering to standards & best practices will cost you more time initially but
will save you effort in the long run.

To learn about Service Oriented Architectures the number one resource I can
recommend is the WEFLY247 project, microsoft developed this Example enterpise
application for poeple who are new to Visual Studio 2005, if you can come to
grasp the concepts expressed in this project you will be well on your way to
developing professional enterprise application architectures.

http://wefly.learn247.net/

Microsoft also recently released an update of the "Enterprise library" this
is a solution filled with various projects that handle common enterprise
tasks like "Event logging, cahcing etc.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?link...87&clcid=0x409

Your mail goal, it seems is to learn more about application architectures

http://msdn.microsoft.com/architecture/

And last but not least, a search results list on SOA:

http://www.google.co.za/search?hl=en...pdf++SOA&meta=
--
In Adversity lies opportunity! - Anonymous
"Robbe Morris [C# MVP]" wrote:
If you are working in .NET 2.0, you'll want to become familiar
with Generics. There are ways to make the different layers
see only portions of your classes so as not to violate
certain design principles.

http://www.eggheadcafe.com/articles/...ion_layers.asp

--
Robbe Morris - 2004-2006 Microsoft MVP C#
Earn money answering .NET questions
http://www.eggheadcafe.com/forums/merit.asp

"Dan Aldean" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ua**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
Hello,

I try to understand how the business and presentation layers would
practically
translate into programming reality.
I read lots of articles about 3-tier, but none of them gave a practical
example
and I managed to understand the data layer only.
Is for example web services and their consumption an instance of n-tier,
covering the business and presentation layers?
If it is not necessary a WEB development how would the presentation and
business
layer come to life, through what? Is ASP the presentation layer and C#
the business layer?

Thanks a lot.


Apr 28 '06 #26

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