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Is there a way to prevent a Button to get the focus?

C# question:

Is there a way to prevent a button from getting the focus and from being
painted with a rectangle of small dots when clicking on it?

Specifically, I have a form with 2 TextBox and a Button: say I am in the
first TextBox and the Button is the next control in the form.

What do I have to do so that tabbing out of the first TextBox skips the
Button over and sets focus to the second Textbox?

Thanks for help.

Eric
Jan 13 '06 #1
4 2981
Have you tried setting the button's TabStop property to false?

Jan 13 '06 #2
Yes, thank you. I had tried that.

But that's not enough.

I'd also like to avoid seeing the small dots signifying focus, appear on the
button when I click on it.

Is that possible?

Thanks.

"Bruce Wood" <br*******@canada.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@o13g2000cwo.googlegr oups.com...
Have you tried setting the button's TabStop property to false?

Jan 14 '06 #3

"EricL" <er**@lescasse.com> wrote in message
news:43***********************@news.easynet.fr...
Yes, thank you. I had tried that.

But that's not enough.

I'd also like to avoid seeing the small dots signifying focus, appear on
the button when I click on it.

Is that possible?


Why would you want to go out of your way to make it hard for disabled users
to use your app?
Jan 15 '06 #4
I would have to agree with Nick, not just regarding disabled users, but
any and all users.

Systems become easier to use when all of the different applications
work in a similar way. If every application is different, even in a
small way, then it makes the whole system harder to understand and use.
"I have special requirements!" you say, but then everyone says that,
and if everyone does that, then Windows becomes a patchwork of special
applications that all act differently, leaving users confused.

I know it's not the answer you were looking for, but one of my "Laws of
Computing" is "a mediocre standard is better than no standard at all,"
or, stated another way, "your 'better way' had better be 100x better,
otherwise it's not worth breaking the standard."

Jan 16 '06 #5

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