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C# vs VB

P: n/a
Any good resources regarding benefitis by using C3 over VB?

/Andy
Nov 17 '05 #1
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28 Replies


P: n/a
There are not many. You can use unsafe code with C#. That's the biggest, and
many developers don't ever need it.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
A watched clock never boils.

"Andy" <ne*********@multizite.org> wrote in message
news:uu**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Any good resources regarding benefitis by using C3 over VB?

/Andy

Nov 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
They both are about 99% the same, from an IL point of view.

You can either stay with what you are comfortable with (VB.NET or C#) or
pick the other language and learn something new.

"Andy" <ne*********@multizite.org> wrote in message
news:uu**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Any good resources regarding benefitis by using C3 over VB?

/Andy

Nov 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:Od****************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
There are not many. You can use unsafe code with C#. That's the biggest


Don't forget pointers...
Nov 17 '05 #4

P: n/a
VJ
if you are doing for Tablet PC.. i would recommend C#...

"Andy" <ne*********@multizite.org> wrote in message
news:uu**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Any good resources regarding benefitis by using C3 over VB?

/Andy

Nov 17 '05 #5

P: n/a
I won't go into a technical comparison. As the others have said, there isn't
much in it between VB and C#, but I'll just look at the market share issue.
This would affect your choice as an individual, in which skill you should
develop, or, as a company, in which language you'll be able to recruit
developers for.

VB has, I think, the most number of developers of any language in the world.
On the other hand, C# is similar to C/C++/Java/JavaScript/PHP/Perl,
etc..etc.. So, learning C# gives you an good start on most of today's heavily
used languages (particularly those used for internet development), whereas
learning VB get's you into the one language which is actually most used.

Java/C++ etc have been object oriented for a long time, and their
communities are very skilled in object oriented development. On the other
hand, VB has only recently become fully object oriented, and I would expect
that overall the community is not as skilled in OO development. However, the
VB community is very strong in Windows development (COM, ADO, ASP, etc..)

My personal preference is c#, by a long way.. :)

Regards,

Javaman
Nov 17 '05 #6

P: n/a
Pointers *are* unsafe code.

--
;-),

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
A watched clock never boils.

"Mark Rae" <ma**@mark-N-O-S-P-A-M-rae.co.uk> wrote in message
news:eD****************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:Od****************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
There are not many. You can use unsafe code with C#. That's the biggest


Don't forget pointers...

Nov 17 '05 #7

P: n/a
Andy wrote:
Any good resources regarding benefitis by using C3 over VB?

/Andy


the biggest reason i've seen to use C# over VB is that C# jobs always
pay more.

and the VB syntax is so backwards I won't even touch it anymore. Any
language that says "End Sub" where a simple "}" would do is just too
crooked to use, imo.
Nov 17 '05 #8

P: n/a
Any
language that says "End Sub" where a simple "}" would do is just too
crooked to use, imo.


So, I take it you also prefer "int i" to "Dim I as Integer"? :)
Nov 17 '05 #9

P: n/a
I am a C# programmer and really enjoy working with it. Made the move from
VB6 and would never go to VB.NET. Having said that, I truely believe that
90% of this is learning the framework.

VB.NET does have a big advantage when working with Office automation. The
Office apps typically have a large number of optional parameters. VB.NET
supports the idea of optional parameters. C# requires that every one be
specified as System.Type.Missing.

Take a look at:

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/522xhsa3

-andrew

"Andy" <ne*********@multizite.org> wrote in message
news:uu**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Any good resources regarding benefitis by using C3 over VB?

/Andy

Nov 17 '05 #10

P: n/a

"jeremiah johnson" <na*******@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Andy wrote:
Any good resources regarding benefitis by using C3 over VB?

/Andy


the biggest reason i've seen to use C# over VB is that C# jobs always pay
more.

and the VB syntax is so backwards I won't even touch it anymore. Any
language that says "End Sub" where a simple "}" would do is just too
crooked to use, imo.


Funny, when I was learning C# from vb, i thought _C#_ was backwards. Who
ever thought of defining the return value of a function before the function
itself:

int SomeFunc() {}

instead of

Function SomeFunc() As Integer : End Function
crazy stuff.

Scott
Nov 17 '05 #11

P: n/a
There are no many differences, being both used on top of the .NET Framework.
As a rule of thumb, people coming from Java or C++ prefer the C# syntax and
people coming from VB6 prefer the VB.NET syntax.

--

Best regards,

Carlos J. Quintero

MZ-Tools: Productivity add-ins for Visual Studio .NET, VB6, VB5 and VBA
You can code, design and document much faster.
Free resources for add-in developers:
http://www.mztools.com

"Andy" <ne*********@multizite.org> escribió en el mensaje
news:uu**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Any good resources regarding benefitis by using C3 over VB?

/Andy

Nov 17 '05 #12

P: n/a
Other VB.NET people think the same about typing ";" all the time when you
can type nothing ;-)

Once you learn the .NET Framework, the language is only a matter of syntax
preference.

--

Best regards,

Carlos J. Quintero

MZ-Tools: Productivity add-ins for Visual Studio .NET, VB6, VB5 and VBA
You can code, design and document much faster.
Free resources for add-in developers:
http://www.mztools.com

"jeremiah johnson" <na*******@gmail.com> escribió en el mensaje
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Andy wrote:
Any good resources regarding benefitis by using C3 over VB?

/Andy


the biggest reason i've seen to use C# over VB is that C# jobs always pay
more.

and the VB syntax is so backwards I won't even touch it anymore. Any
language that says "End Sub" where a simple "}" would do is just too
crooked to use, imo.

Nov 17 '05 #13

P: n/a
As many stated there is not much difference from a functional point of
view. There is a big difference from a cultural point of view. Following
is an article that points this out in great detail.
http://www.cmswire.com/cms/featured-...cle-000591.php

Hope this helps
Leon Lambert

Andy wrote:
Any good resources regarding benefitis by using C3 over VB?

/Andy

Nov 17 '05 #14

P: n/a

"Carlos J. Quintero [VB MVP]" <ca*****@NOSPAMsogecable.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Other VB.NET people think the same about typing ";" all the time when you
can type nothing ;-)


While C# crowd think the same about typing _ for continuing in new line ;-)

--
Miha Markic [MVP C#]
RightHand .NET consulting & development www.rthand.com
Blog: http://cs.rthand.com/blogs/blog_with_righthand/
Nov 17 '05 #15

P: n/a
> While C# crowd think the same about typing _ for continuing in new line
;-)
Actually, the only thing I (myself) think about regarding typing is how to
avoid as much as possible, regardless of the syntax. It makes the code less
buggy initially. Computers make less mistakes than humans!

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
A watched clock never boils.

"Miha Markic [MVP C#]" <miha at rthand com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
"Carlos J. Quintero [VB MVP]" <ca*****@NOSPAMsogecable.com> wrote in
message news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Other VB.NET people think the same about typing ";" all the time when you
can type nothing ;-)


While C# crowd think the same about typing _ for continuing in new line
;-)

--
Miha Markic [MVP C#]
RightHand .NET consulting & development www.rthand.com
Blog: http://cs.rthand.com/blogs/blog_with_righthand/

Nov 17 '05 #16

P: n/a
Max
On Thu, 03 Nov 2005 22:34:24 -0600, jeremiah johnson wrote:
Andy wrote: the biggest reason i've seen to use C# over VB is that C# jobs always
pay more.


That's reason enough for me to use C#:-)
Nov 17 '05 #17

P: n/a
Max <eu**********@yahoo.com> wrote:
the biggest reason i've seen to use C# over VB is that C# jobs always
pay more.


That's reason enough for me to use C#:-)


It certainly wouldn't be enough for me. There are plenty of languages
and platforms which earn bigger bucks than C#. I seem to recall that
COBOL programmers do rather well because there aren't that many people
willing to maintain COBOL any more.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet Blog: http://www.msmvps.com/jon.skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 17 '05 #18

P: n/a
VB.net is best fit for the following reasons:

1) You have to type less. Consider the following statements to declare a
SqlConnection

VB.net
=====
Dim mycon As New SqlConnection

Taking into consoderation intellisense and auto title case, you will have to
PRESS 17 KEYS

C#
==
SqlConnection mycon = new SqlConnection();

You have to press 26 + 2 (capital letter) = 28 keys even by using
intellisense.

And the most irritating this is, you have to remember the object name
SqlConnection (consider this for other objects whose name you might not
remember)

IsNumeric etc.
==========
You have many functions like IsNumeric, Mid etc. in VB.net which are handy.
You have to write separate function in C# for using the above. Allright you
people must be thinking that using these functions are not PURE (in terms of
..Net) , these are very very handy.

Optional Parameters
=============
VB.net supports optional parameters, but C# does not support them. Although
people might argue that you can use overloaded functions instead, these is
one catch to it. Say for example the function a hundred lines of code and the
optional parameter is just going to be used for checking in an if condition
(most optional parameters are used for that). In C# you have to do this by
overloading the function and in that process paste the hundred lines of code
again. What a waste... ?

=======
Regards,
Maruthi
=======

"Andy" wrote:
Any good resources regarding benefitis by using C3 over VB?

/Andy

Nov 17 '05 #19

P: n/a
On Sat, 5 Nov 2005 21:16:09 -0800, "Maruthi"
<Ma*****@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
VB.net is best fit for the following reasons:

Ugh, to much bullshit for my taste. I just had to reply.

1) You have to type less. Consider the following statements to declare a
SqlConnection

VB.net
=====
Dim mycon As New SqlConnection

Taking into consoderation intellisense and auto title case, you will have to
PRESS 17 KEYS

C#
==
SqlConnection mycon = new SqlConnection();

You have to press 26 + 2 (capital letter) = 28 keys even by using
intellisense.
True, in this particular case you save a couple of characters typing.
However, programming isn't a speed contest and as such it doesn't
matter if you have to type a few more characters.

Also, try the following

C#
==
int x = 5;

VB.NET
==
Dim x As Integer
x = 5

And the most irritating this is, you have to remember the object name
SqlConnection (consider this for other objects whose name you might not
remember)
What the heck are you talking about? You have to know that it is an
SqlConnection in both vb and c#. And it is class name, not object
name.

IsNumeric etc.
==========
You have many functions like IsNumeric, Mid etc. in VB.net which are handy.
You have to write separate function in C# for using the above. Allright you
people must be thinking that using these functions are not PURE (in terms of
.Net) , these are very very handy.

For many of those methods, there are similar methods in the .Net
Framework. Also, if you are using C# and need access to a specific vb
method, you can also include the vb.dll in the project. This is much
better than forcing a bunch of methods into the language
specification.
Optional Parameters
=============
VB.net supports optional parameters, but C# does not support them. Although
people might argue that you can use overloaded functions instead, these is
one catch to it. Say for example the function a hundred lines of code and the
optional parameter is just going to be used for checking in an if condition
(most optional parameters are used for that). In C# you have to do this by
overloading the function and in that process paste the hundred lines of code
again. What a waste... ?


Paste hundreds of lines of code???????

public void LongMethod(int optionalParameterThatDefaultsToTen)
{
.....
}

public void LongMethod()
{
LongMethod(10);
}

I count 4 lines, and if you are really sensitive about space you could
always do it like this.

public void LongMethod(){ LongMethod(10); }

--
Marcus Andrén
Nov 17 '05 #20

P: n/a
> IsNumeric etc.
==========
You have many functions like IsNumeric, Mid etc. in VB.net which are
handy.
You have to write separate function in C# for using the above. Allright
you
people must be thinking that using these functions are not PURE (in terms
of
.Net) , these are very very handy.


If i'm not mistaken, these are implemented in something like
"Microsoft.VisualBasic.dll"-- a library that could be imported into _any_
..net project, including c#.

scott
Nov 17 '05 #21

P: n/a
> Taking into consoderation intellisense and auto title case, you will have
to
PRESS 17 KEYS ....

Um. This has nothing to do with the VB.Net language, but with the version of
Microsoft Visual Studio.Net that you happen to be using. You might want to
take a look at VS.Net 2005 and update your impression.

In fact, the syntax for C# is much more compact than VB.Net. So, it might be
said that, comparing apples to apples, you type less with C#.
IsNumeric etc.
==========
You have many functions like IsNumeric, Mid etc. in VB.net which are
handy.
This also has nothing to do with the VB.Net language. These functions are in
an assembly which can be used with either language. The VS.Net IDE simply
references it automatically when creating a VB.Net project, so that people
like yourself can use what they are familiar with, without having to know
anything about it, or understand where it comes from.
Optional Parameters
=============
VB.net supports optional parameters, but C# does not support them.
Although
people might argue that you can use overloaded functions instead, these is
one catch to it. Say for example the function a hundred lines of code and
the
optional parameter is just going to be used for checking in an if
condition
(most optional parameters are used for that). In C# you have to do this by
overloading the function and in that process paste the hundred lines of
code
again. What a waste... ?
Apparently, you haven't written overloaded functions before (even though
VB.Net allows you to), or simply don't know how to do it. Consider the
following:

public static int IndexOfEnd(string source, string searchString, int
startIndex)
{
int i = source.IndexOf(searchString, startIndex);
if (i < 0) return i;
return i + searchString.Length;
}

public static int IndexOfEnd(string source, string searchString)
{
return IndexOfEnd(source, searchString, 0);
}

Note that none of the code in the first definition is duplicated in the
second. The second simply calls the first, and passes a (default) third
parameter to it.

In fact, optional parameters are an illusion. The parameters are there; they
are simply given default values when they are not explicitly declared in the
method call. The above could be defined with optional parameters in VB:

Public Function IndexOfEnd(ByVal source As String, _
ByVal searchString As String, Optional ByVal startIndex As Integer = 0)
Dim i As Integer = source.IndexOf(searchString, startIndex)
If i < 0 Then Return i
Return i + searchString.Length
End Function

The VB function actually *always* takes 3 parameters. The compiler supplies
the third if the developer leaves it out.

As to the reasoning behind the decision not to support optional parameters
in C#, see the following article:

http://blogs.msdn.com/csharpfaq/arch.../07/85556.aspx

There are some very sharp people who write in defense of VB.Net. It is a
fine .Net programming language. But this sort of argument only adds to the
widely-held impression held by many that VB is a bad language because it
fosters ignorance on the part of the developer, and leads to a large segment
of ignorant and unskilled VB developers.

Personally, I do believe that there are more VB hacks out there than C#
hacks. Until the current version of the .Net Framework and Visual
Studio.Net, this has been made possible by the lack of strictness in the
language, and Microsoft's accomodations to the VB programming community, to
make it easier for VB developers to transition to the .Net Framework. In
other words, it has been easier to write bad code in VB.Net than in C#, and
it's easier to write bad code than it is to write good code. Lazy people
tend to take the easiest path, test less, and worry about the consequences
later. This should not be taken as a sweeping generalization, or a criticism
of the language or the VB.Net community, but as a statistical theory, which
may be useful in the future development of the language.

However, in fact, there are many top-notch VB developers out there. They use
VB because they like the syntax, and either have no need for the extra
capabilities of C#, or use C# when they need to (which isn't often).
Personal preference and comfort is a perfectly valid reason for using any
language.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
A watched clock never boils.

"Maruthi" <Ma*****@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:21**********************************@microsof t.com... VB.net is best fit for the following reasons:

1) You have to type less. Consider the following statements to declare a
SqlConnection

VB.net
=====
Dim mycon As New SqlConnection

Taking into consoderation intellisense and auto title case, you will have
to
PRESS 17 KEYS

C#
==
SqlConnection mycon = new SqlConnection();

You have to press 26 + 2 (capital letter) = 28 keys even by using
intellisense.

And the most irritating this is, you have to remember the object name
SqlConnection (consider this for other objects whose name you might not
remember)

IsNumeric etc.
==========
You have many functions like IsNumeric, Mid etc. in VB.net which are
handy.
You have to write separate function in C# for using the above. Allright
you
people must be thinking that using these functions are not PURE (in terms
of
.Net) , these are very very handy.

Optional Parameters
=============
VB.net supports optional parameters, but C# does not support them.
Although
people might argue that you can use overloaded functions instead, these is
one catch to it. Say for example the function a hundred lines of code and
the
optional parameter is just going to be used for checking in an if
condition
(most optional parameters are used for that). In C# you have to do this by
overloading the function and in that process paste the hundred lines of
code
again. What a waste... ?

=======
Regards,
Maruthi
=======

"Andy" wrote:
Any good resources regarding benefitis by using C3 over VB?

/Andy

Nov 17 '05 #22

P: n/a
Not sure if I saw this one addressed:

"Maruthi" <Ma*****@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:21**********************************@microsof t.com...
...
C#
==
SqlConnection mycon = new SqlConnection();

...
And the most irritating this is, you have to remember the object name
SqlConnection (consider this for other objects whose name you might not
remember)

Actually, as long as you remember the namespace SqlConnection is in, you can
get intellisense to give you a list of class names in that namespace, so you
don't really have to remember that. It is a bit of extra typing to put the
namespace first, but from my POV, typing a few extra chars just isn't an
issue. I spend a lot more of my programming time thinking than typing.

You know what? I think most of use like our "home" language best. I like C#
because it feels closer to the plain ol' K&R C I was raised on. I wouldn't
presume to know enough about VB to give empirical reasons to like one or the
other better. I just like the way it feels, and that's enough for me :-)
Nov 17 '05 #23

P: n/a
I'm not sure if i'm adding or taking away fuel from the fire.

In both languages (i started in vb and switched to cs), I find typing the
property definitions a pain, whether its

Public Property SomeProp() As String
Get
Return _someProp
End Get
Set(ByVal Value As String)
_someProp = Value
End Set
End Property

or

public string SomeProp {
get { return _someProp; }
set { _someProp = value; }
}

both end up to be a lot of typing. and although i prefer c#, i still think
there's something fishy about the implicit variable 'value' in properties...

scott

"Rachel Suddeth" <ra****@bldhound.com> wrote in message
news:u3**************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
Not sure if I saw this one addressed:

"Maruthi" <Ma*****@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:21**********************************@microsof t.com...
...
C#
==
SqlConnection mycon = new SqlConnection();

...
And the most irritating this is, you have to remember the object name
SqlConnection (consider this for other objects whose name you might not
remember)

Actually, as long as you remember the namespace SqlConnection is in, you
can
get intellisense to give you a list of class names in that namespace, so
you
don't really have to remember that. It is a bit of extra typing to put the
namespace first, but from my POV, typing a few extra chars just isn't an
issue. I spend a lot more of my programming time thinking than typing.

You know what? I think most of use like our "home" language best. I like
C#
because it feels closer to the plain ol' K&R C I was raised on. I wouldn't
presume to know enough about VB to give empirical reasons to like one or
the
other better. I just like the way it feels, and that's enough for me :-)

Nov 17 '05 #24

P: n/a
Maruthi <Ma*****@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
VB.net is best fit for the following reasons:

1) You have to type less. Consider the following statements to declare a
SqlConnection
LOL. How much of software development time is actually spent in typing,
would you say? Writing readable code is far more important. Do you
recommend always using single letter variable names and avoiding
writing comments, too?
IsNumeric etc.
==========
You have many functions like IsNumeric, Mid etc. in VB.net which are handy.
They're not object oriented, and I've had nasty experiences in terms of
their behaviour when it comes to different cultures (in particular
changing the culture of a thread doesn't affect *all* VB.NET functions,
even if some of them are affected by the culture of the thread which
*first* calls them. Very odd stuff).
You have to write separate function in C# for using the above.
Not for "Mid" you don't - what's wrong with Substring? (Admittedly
Substring throws an exception if you ask for data outside its range -
which I believe is almost always a better behaviour than silently
returning less data than you asked for.)

If you really want to use them from C# though, you can do so.
Optional Parameters
=============
VB.net supports optional parameters, but C# does not support them. Although
people might argue that you can use overloaded functions instead, these is
one catch to it. Say for example the function a hundred lines of code and the
optional parameter is just going to be used for checking in an if condition
(most optional parameters are used for that). In C# you have to do this by
overloading the function and in that process paste the hundred lines of code
again. What a waste... ?


You seem to be unaware of the possibility of calling one method from
another. You wouldn't paste the hundred lines of code. You'd write:

void SomeMethod()
{
SomeMethod(defaultValue); // Whatever the default value is
}

void SomeMethod (int parameter)
{
// 100 lines of code here
}

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet Blog: http://www.msmvps.com/jon.skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 17 '05 #25

P: n/a
"Jon Skeet [C# MVP]" <sk***@pobox.com> wrote in message
news:MP***********************@msnews.microsoft.co m...> void SomeMethod()
{
SomeMethod(defaultValue); // Whatever the default value is
}

void SomeMethod (int parameter)
{
// 100 lines of code here
}


I'm surprised at you, Jon. I thought a single method with a 100 lines was
bad form?

Scott
Nov 17 '05 #26

P: n/a
Scott Coonce wrote:
"Jon Skeet [C# MVP]" <sk***@pobox.com> wrote in message
news:MP***********************@msnews.microsoft.co m...> void SomeMethod()
{
SomeMethod(defaultValue); // Whatever the default value is
}

void SomeMethod (int parameter)
{
// 100 lines of code here
}


I'm surprised at you, Jon. I thought a single method with a 100 lines was
bad form?


Usually, yes - although there are exceptions to the rule.

However, one method with 100 lines is better than two methods with 100
lines which are almost duplicates of each other :)

Jon

Nov 17 '05 #27

P: n/a
why is it bad form? I'm currently stearing at a method i wrote the has 500
lines. I'll add that these are 500 compact lines of code. Where is the bad
form? You can't simply generalize about software development especially if
you write code that interfaces with other pieces of software that require
certain lengthy initializations.

--
Regards,
Alvin Bruney [MVP ASP.NET]

[Shameless Author plug]
The Microsoft Office Web Components Black Book with .NET
Now Available @ www.lulu.com/owc
Forth-coming VSTO.NET - Wrox/Wiley 2006
-------------------------------------------------------

"Scott Coonce" <sd******@gmail.HEY_YOU.com> wrote in message
news:uP**************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
"Jon Skeet [C# MVP]" <sk***@pobox.com> wrote in message
news:MP***********************@msnews.microsoft.co m...> void SomeMethod()
{
SomeMethod(defaultValue); // Whatever the default value is
}

void SomeMethod (int parameter)
{
// 100 lines of code here
}


I'm surprised at you, Jon. I thought a single method with a 100 lines was
bad form?

Scott

Nov 17 '05 #28

P: n/a
<"Alvin Bruney - ASP.NET MVP" <www.lulu.com/owc>> wrote:
why is it bad form? I'm currently stearing at a method i wrote the has 500
lines. I'll add that these are 500 compact lines of code. Where is the bad
form? You can't simply generalize about software development especially if
you write code that interfaces with other pieces of software that require
certain lengthy initializations.


That length initialization can usually be broken up into smaller
methods, each of which is more easily understood, and more easily
tested. I often write a method which does nothing but call three or
four other methods in turn. That means when I need an overview of what
it does, I can just look at the names of the methods. When I need to
check the detail of a specific bit, I can skip straight to that method,
without looking at the intervening bits.

I rarely have a method which is more than about a page.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet Blog: http://www.msmvps.com/jon.skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 17 '05 #29

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