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Object Oriented Programming book

P: n/a
I've searched Amazon and read probably 100 reviews but can't find what seems
to be any book that is widely accepted as the definitive book on object
oriented programming design and techniques. And most of the highest rated
are all written 10 to 15 years ago. Any good suggestions?
Nov 17 '05 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
"Design Patterns" by Gamma et. al. is considered the old testament of Object
Oriented Programming. The design patterns in there are still known today as
the Gang of 4 patterns. If you haven't read it, I'd reccomend it. This book
tells you how to describe a code base in terms of patterns, but is light on
techniques for arriving at the best OO design.

For techniques on arriving at the best OO design, I'd reccomend "Agile
Software Development" by Bob Martin, and "Test Driven Development" by Kent
Beck.

--
Regards,

Tim Haughton

Agitek
http://agitek.co.uk
http://blogitek.com/timhaughton

"Dale" <da******@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:58**********************************@microsof t.com...
I've searched Amazon and read probably 100 reviews but can't find what seems to be any book that is widely accepted as the definitive book on object
oriented programming design and techniques. And most of the highest rated
are all written 10 to 15 years ago. Any good suggestions?

Nov 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
Dale wrote:
I've searched Amazon and read probably 100 reviews but can't find what seems
to be any book that is widely accepted as the definitive book on object
oriented programming design and techniques. And most of the highest rated
are all written 10 to 15 years ago. Any good suggestions?


A book I'm considering is: Beginning C# Objects: From Concepts to Code
by Barker and Palmer. I've also seen: Expert C# Business Objects by Lhotka.

But I'm not sure if these are what you are looking for.
Nov 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
A couple more spring to mind, Ron Jeffries' "Extreme Programming Adventures
in C#", and "Test Driven Development In C#", which I *think* is written by
Jim Newkirk et.al.

--
Regards,

Tim Haughton

Agitek
http://agitek.co.uk
http://blogitek.com/timhaughton

"Tim Haughton" <ti*********@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:8H*********************@fe03.news.easynews.co m...
"Design Patterns" by Gamma et. al. is considered the old testament of Object Oriented Programming. The design patterns in there are still known today as the Gang of 4 patterns. If you haven't read it, I'd reccomend it. This book tells you how to describe a code base in terms of patterns, but is light on techniques for arriving at the best OO design.

For techniques on arriving at the best OO design, I'd reccomend "Agile
Software Development" by Bob Martin, and "Test Driven Development" by Kent
Beck.

--
Regards,

Tim Haughton

Agitek
http://agitek.co.uk
http://blogitek.com/timhaughton

"Dale" <da******@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:58**********************************@microsof t.com...
I've searched Amazon and read probably 100 reviews but can't find what

seems
to be any book that is widely accepted as the definitive book on object
oriented programming design and techniques. And most of the highest rated are all written 10 to 15 years ago. Any good suggestions?


Nov 17 '05 #4

P: n/a
Hi Dale,

For OOP, Grady Booch's Object-Oriented Analiysis and Design with
Applications is a good one which is described in C++. Also, if you'd like
to get more about the OOP/OOD in morden application programming framework,
such as .NET, j2ee, I'd suggest you reference those patterns/practices tech
articles on the web. For example, the MSDN's enterprise patterns practice
library provide many good reference on this:

#Microsoft patterns & practices Home
http://msdn.microsoft.com/practices/

Hope also helps. Thanks,

Steven Cheng
Microsoft Online Support

Get Secure! www.microsoft.com/security
(This posting is provided "AS IS", with no warranties, and confers no
rights.)

--------------------
| From: "Tim Haughton" <ti*********@gmail.com>
| Newsgroups: microsoft.public.dotnet.languages.csharp
| References: <58**********************************@microsoft.co m>
| Subject: Re: Object Oriented Programming book
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otherwise we will be unable to process your complaint properly.
| Date: Mon, 05 Sep 2005 07:44:04 GMT
| Path:
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| X-Tomcat-NG: microsoft.public.dotnet.languages.csharp
|
| "Design Patterns" by Gamma et. al. is considered the old testament of
Object
| Oriented Programming. The design patterns in there are still known today
as
| the Gang of 4 patterns. If you haven't read it, I'd reccomend it. This
book
| tells you how to describe a code base in terms of patterns, but is light
on
| techniques for arriving at the best OO design.
|
| For techniques on arriving at the best OO design, I'd reccomend "Agile
| Software Development" by Bob Martin, and "Test Driven Development" by Kent
| Beck.
|
| --
| Regards,
|
| Tim Haughton
|
| Agitek
| http://agitek.co.uk
| http://blogitek.com/timhaughton
|
| "Dale" <da******@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
| news:58**********************************@microsof t.com...
| > I've searched Amazon and read probably 100 reviews but can't find what
| seems
| > to be any book that is widely accepted as the definitive book on object
| > oriented programming design and techniques. And most of the highest
rated
| > are all written 10 to 15 years ago. Any good suggestions?
|
|
|

Nov 17 '05 #5

P: n/a
_R
On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 20:23:02 -0700, "Dale" <da******@nospam.nospam>
wrote:
I've searched Amazon and read probably 100 reviews but can't find what seems
to be any book that is widely accepted as the definitive book on object
oriented programming design and techniques. And most of the highest rated
are all written 10 to 15 years ago. Any good suggestions?


Have you looked thru the Gang of 4 Patterns book? (Gamma, Vlissides
and crew). If you have, and ended up alienated (many do at first--it
can get fairly obtuse)) then look at Design Patterns Explained:
http://tinyurl.com/bppvu

The tiny book "Joy of Patterns" is a good gentle intro.

C# Design Patterns by Cooper is OK, and may help to relate to your
home turf.

As far as program structure and diagramming, many like Larman's
"applying UML and Patterns." It covers a lot of ground. Or Page-
Jones' "Fundamentals of Object-oriented Design in UML" (it's better
than it sounds).

NOT recommended: Thilmany's .NET Patterns. Too specialized and
obscure for your purposes.

Semi-recommended: Visit Comp.Object or archives. Easy to stir up some
ardent advocates of different approaches there, but there are some
serious people on that group.
Nov 17 '05 #6

P: n/a
Thanks for all the replies. I have, and have read, GOF, Larman, and Fowler's
Refactoring, etc.

While I use concepts of inheritance, encapsulation, polymorphism, etc. every
day, what I am looking for is the basics in theory and practice of these
basic OOP concepts - something that will give the same depth of coverage on
these basics as the other referenced works give on the advanced concepts.

It sounds like Booch is the one to get, then. With the price and age of all
these books, I was just hesitant to make the leap. You spend 50+ dollars for
one book and it ends up on the bookshelf and then you spend 50+ for others,
like Refactoring, and can't put it down. What's a developer to do, huh?

Thanks again.

Dale Preston
"Steven Cheng[MSFT]" wrote:
Hi Dale,

For OOP, Grady Booch's Object-Oriented Analiysis and Design with
Applications is a good one which is described in C++. Also, if you'd like
to get more about the OOP/OOD in morden application programming framework,
such as .NET, j2ee, I'd suggest you reference those patterns/practices tech
articles on the web. For example, the MSDN's enterprise patterns practice
library provide many good reference on this:

#Microsoft patterns & practices Home
http://msdn.microsoft.com/practices/

Hope also helps. Thanks,

Steven Cheng
Microsoft Online Support

Get Secure! www.microsoft.com/security
(This posting is provided "AS IS", with no warranties, and confers no
rights.)

--------------------
| From: "Tim Haughton" <ti*********@gmail.com>
| Newsgroups: microsoft.public.dotnet.languages.csharp
| References: <58**********************************@microsoft.co m>
| Subject: Re: Object Oriented Programming book
| Lines: 28
| X-Priority: 3
| X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
| X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.2800.1506
| X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.2800.1506
| Message-ID: <8H*********************@fe03.news.easynews.com>
| X-Complaints-To: ab***@easynews.com
| Organization: EasyNews, UseNet made Easy!
| X-Complaints-Info: Please be sure to forward a copy of ALL headers
otherwise we will be unable to process your complaint properly.
| Date: Mon, 05 Sep 2005 07:44:04 GMT
| Path:
TK2MSFTNGXA01.phx.gbl!TK2MSFTFEED02.phx.gbl!tornad o.fastwebnet.it!tiscali!ne
wsfeed1.ip.tiscali.net!newshub.sdsu.edu!newsfeed.n ews2me.com!newsfeed2.easyn
ews.com!easynews.com!easynews!easynews-local!fe03.news.easynews.com.POSTED!n
ot-for-mail
| Xref: TK2MSFTNGXA01.phx.gbl
microsoft.public.dotnet.languages.csharp:120229
| X-Tomcat-NG: microsoft.public.dotnet.languages.csharp
|
| "Design Patterns" by Gamma et. al. is considered the old testament of
Object
| Oriented Programming. The design patterns in there are still known today
as
| the Gang of 4 patterns. If you haven't read it, I'd reccomend it. This
book
| tells you how to describe a code base in terms of patterns, but is light
on
| techniques for arriving at the best OO design.
|
| For techniques on arriving at the best OO design, I'd reccomend "Agile
| Software Development" by Bob Martin, and "Test Driven Development" by Kent
| Beck.
|
| --
| Regards,
|
| Tim Haughton
|
| Agitek
| http://agitek.co.uk
| http://blogitek.com/timhaughton
|
| "Dale" <da******@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
| news:58**********************************@microsof t.com...
| > I've searched Amazon and read probably 100 reviews but can't find what
| seems
| > to be any book that is widely accepted as the definitive book on object
| > oriented programming design and techniques. And most of the highest
rated
| > are all written 10 to 15 years ago. Any good suggestions?
|
|
|

Nov 17 '05 #7

P: n/a
John,

I'll let you know about Beginning C# Objects. I ordered it as well. Even
though I have a few years experience in OOP and C#, it sounds like it will do
a good job on filling in gaps.
--
Dale Preston

"John Salerno" wrote:
Dale wrote:
I've searched Amazon and read probably 100 reviews but can't find what seems
to be any book that is widely accepted as the definitive book on object
oriented programming design and techniques. And most of the highest rated
are all written 10 to 15 years ago. Any good suggestions?


A book I'm considering is: Beginning C# Objects: From Concepts to Code
by Barker and Palmer. I've also seen: Expert C# Business Objects by Lhotka.

But I'm not sure if these are what you are looking for.

Nov 17 '05 #8

P: n/a
Dale wrote:
John,

I'll let you know about Beginning C# Objects. I ordered it as well. Even
though I have a few years experience in OOP and C#, it sounds like it will do
a good job on filling in gaps.


Yes, it seems like it's perfect, especially for a beginner like me. I'd
really like to solidify these ideas of OOP, especially polymorphism. The
only reason I haven't gotten the book yet is because it's so big, and
I'm already in the middle of four other books! :)

I'd love to hear your impressions when you look through it.
Nov 17 '05 #9

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