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Application design

I've been struggling with C# for the last couple of months (I'm a VB6
developer) and it dawned on me this morning that it has nothing to do with
C# and everything to do with application design.

Case in point; I recently developed an application in C# that worked
perfectly well and performed the task I required. Having finished the
development, I went back and split the program in to four classes, so ending
up with a program that did exactly the same job but was more "object
oriented".

Great, but I'm sure I should have started out with four classes! Thinking
about it, I designed and developed in the same way I would have in VB6 then,
as an after thought, went back to make it a C# application.

What I'm looking for is a short tutorial on how to design for C#. I'm not
after a deep and meaningful course in object oriented design, just some
basics and some tips to get me started in the right direction.

Anyone know where I can get something like this?

Thanks
Steve
Nov 17 '05 #1
3 1436
Excellent work, Steve! Object-oriented programming was developed to enhance
productivity by enabling developers to better organize their applications,
for purposes of maintainability, debugging, upgrading, and extending, and to
create reusable "building blocks" that can be recombined in future projects.
You have hit the nail on the head with your question. It so happens that the
Microsoft MSDN Library has a whole section dealing with these issues:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/practices/...s/default.aspx

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
Neither a follower nor a lender be.

"Steve Barnett" <no****@nodomain.com> wrote in message
news:%2***************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
I've been struggling with C# for the last couple of months (I'm a VB6
developer) and it dawned on me this morning that it has nothing to do with
C# and everything to do with application design.

Case in point; I recently developed an application in C# that worked
perfectly well and performed the task I required. Having finished the
development, I went back and split the program in to four classes, so
ending up with a program that did exactly the same job but was more
"object oriented".

Great, but I'm sure I should have started out with four classes! Thinking
about it, I designed and developed in the same way I would have in VB6
then, as an after thought, went back to make it a C# application.

What I'm looking for is a short tutorial on how to design for C#. I'm not
after a deep and meaningful course in object oriented design, just some
basics and some tips to get me started in the right direction.

Anyone know where I can get something like this?

Thanks
Steve

Nov 17 '05 #2
> What I'm looking for is a short tutorial on how to design for C#. I'm not
after a deep and meaningful course in object oriented design, just some
basics and some tips to get me started in the right direction.


Hi Steve, the transition from VB6 to any object oriented language is not
easy, kudos for taking it on.

For general development tips, it's certainly worth reading the Microsoft
patterns and practices web site:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/practices/
http://msdn.microsoft.com/architecture/

For a good grouding in how to pragmatically come to the best oo design, I
can reccomend Bob Martin's 'Agile Software Development', and also Kent Beck
on "Test Driven Development". Whilst not formally OO books, they will show
you techniques for arriving at the best designs for your apps.

--
Regards,

Tim Haughton

Agitek
http://agitek.co.uk
http://blogitek.com/timhaughton
Nov 17 '05 #3
Thanks Kevin and Tim, there is certainly a lot to read there! I'd largely
given up on the Microsoft site as there is just so much stuff there that I
find myself wading through hundreds of hits on the results of a search. When
you're not sure what you need to know being presented with so much
information is counter productive.

What'd be really nice is if MS would publish a straightforward roadmap
suggesting what to read and in what order to get up to speed.

Thanks again
Steve
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:uU*************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
Excellent work, Steve! Object-oriented programming was developed to
enhance productivity by enabling developers to better organize their
applications, for purposes of maintainability, debugging, upgrading, and
extending, and to create reusable "building blocks" that can be recombined
in future projects. You have hit the nail on the head with your question.
It so happens that the Microsoft MSDN Library has a whole section dealing
with these issues:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/practices/...s/default.aspx

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Neither a follower nor a lender be.

"Steve Barnett" <no****@nodomain.com> wrote in message
news:%2***************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
I've been struggling with C# for the last couple of months (I'm a VB6
developer) and it dawned on me this morning that it has nothing to do
with C# and everything to do with application design.

Case in point; I recently developed an application in C# that worked
perfectly well and performed the task I required. Having finished the
development, I went back and split the program in to four classes, so
ending up with a program that did exactly the same job but was more
"object oriented".

Great, but I'm sure I should have started out with four classes! Thinking
about it, I designed and developed in the same way I would have in VB6
then, as an after thought, went back to make it a C# application.

What I'm looking for is a short tutorial on how to design for C#. I'm not
after a deep and meaningful course in object oriented design, just some
basics and some tips to get me started in the right direction.

Anyone know where I can get something like this?

Thanks
Steve


Nov 17 '05 #4

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