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Aspect oriented programming in C#

P: n/a
Hi all just wondering will the next hype be aspect oriented
programming.
I was reading through this link and just thought about it

http://www.geocities.com/aspectdotnet/

Nov 17 '05 #1
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9 Replies


P: n/a
ma*********@yahoo.co.in wrote:
Hi all just wondering will the next hype be aspect oriented
programming.
I was reading through this link and just thought about it

http://www.geocities.com/aspectdotnet/


There was a lot of goings on with aspects in the Java community three
years ago and I haven't seen any tangible results. I've yet to see a job
spec requiring aspects or open-source software that makes use of aspects
either.

OO was hyped beyond belief but only really reached mass appeal with
Visual Studio C++ and Java. I guess aspects will need something similar.

Also I didn't think the article on the link made a very good case for
aspects anyway. The problems it presents could be solved much better
with proper implementations using design patterns. A far better example
for aspects is exception handling. Why should I as a developer of
classes be concerned with how exceptions are handled? That is something
which can be applied across the classes beyond the functional design of
the system.

Just my thoughts.

Cheers
Jimbo
Nov 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
I might be way out of my league here, but I happened to read about
aspect-oriented programming the other day. It seemed to be something
that you can use along with OOP, rather than something that will replace
it as an 'ideology' for programming. Is that right?

Jimbo wrote:
ma*********@yahoo.co.in wrote:
Hi all just wondering will the next hype be aspect oriented
programming.
I was reading through this link and just thought about it

http://www.geocities.com/aspectdotnet/

There was a lot of goings on with aspects in the Java community three
years ago and I haven't seen any tangible results. I've yet to see a job
spec requiring aspects or open-source software that makes use of aspects
either.

OO was hyped beyond belief but only really reached mass appeal with
Visual Studio C++ and Java. I guess aspects will need something similar.

Also I didn't think the article on the link made a very good case for
aspects anyway. The problems it presents could be solved much better
with proper implementations using design patterns. A far better example
for aspects is exception handling. Why should I as a developer of
classes be concerned with how exceptions are handled? That is something
which can be applied across the classes beyond the functional design of
the system.

Just my thoughts.

Cheers
Jimbo

Nov 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
That's right. In fact it doesn't really work without OO.

John Salerno wrote:
I might be way out of my league here, but I happened to read about
aspect-oriented programming the other day. It seemed to be something
that you can use along with OOP, rather than something that will replace
it as an 'ideology' for programming. Is that right?

Jimbo wrote:
ma*********@yahoo.co.in wrote:
Hi all just wondering will the next hype be aspect oriented
programming.
I was reading through this link and just thought about it

http://www.geocities.com/aspectdotnet/


Also I didn't think the article on the link made a very good case for
aspects anyway. The problems it presents could be solved much better
with proper implementations using design patterns. A far better
example for aspects is exception handling. Why should I as a developer
of classes be concerned with how exceptions are handled? That is
something which can be applied across the classes beyond the
functional design of the system.

Nov 17 '05 #4

P: n/a
Jimbo wrote:
That's right. In fact it doesn't really work without OO.


Ah, good. I'd hate to learn an OO programminng language, only to have
something new come along instead! Although I imagine it will take quite
a while for something to replace OOP.
Nov 17 '05 #5

P: n/a
ma*********@yahoo.co.in escribió:
Hi all just wondering will the next hype be aspect oriented
programming.
I was reading through this link and just thought about it

http://www.geocities.com/aspectdotnet/

Well yes, AOP seems to be the next big thing. It's quite interesting
anyway, althoug I haven't already use it in a real project. A few months
back watched a series of webcast on Architecture and found that Avanade
(original creators of Enterprise Library) have a framework on AOP that
covers many of the laborious task of many applications: logging,
exceptions, security and best, as I understood, there can be concerns of
the domain we are solving.

As of implementations, the only one I've tried is Spring.NET. The recent
release 1.0 includes the AOP framework.

Saludos,

Martín Trejo Chávez
Chilli Coder
Nov 17 '05 #6

P: n/a
Jimbo <ji***@notexist.domain.com> wrote:
There was a lot of goings on with aspects in the Java community three
years ago and I haven't seen any tangible results. I've yet to see a job
spec requiring aspects or open-source software that makes use of aspects
either.


See http://www.springframework.org then - it's a framework which
(amongst its many other benefits) makes AOP pretty simple to use. We
use it for logging and translating exceptions at work.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 17 '05 #7

P: n/a
Jon Skeet [C# MVP] wrote:
Jimbo <ji***@notexist.domain.com> wrote:
There was a lot of goings on with aspects in the Java community three
years ago and I haven't seen any tangible results. I've yet to see a job
spec requiring aspects or open-source software that makes use of aspects
either.

See http://www.springframework.org then - it's a framework which
(amongst its many other benefits) makes AOP pretty simple to use. We
use it for logging and translating exceptions at work.


Pretty neat stuff. I might download it and have a little play. Plus it
is using AOP for the only two scenarios I have come across, namely
logging and exceptions.

Cheers
Jimbo
Nov 17 '05 #8

P: n/a
Jimbo <ji***@notexist.domain.com> wrote:
See http://www.springframework.org then - it's a framework which
(amongst its many other benefits) makes AOP pretty simple to use. We
use it for logging and translating exceptions at work.


Pretty neat stuff. I might download it and have a little play. Plus it
is using AOP for the only two scenarios I have come across, namely
logging and exceptions.


No - it's not Spring that's using it for logging and exceptions - it's
our code which is using it for logging and exceptions, taking advantage
of the Spring support for AOP.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 17 '05 #9

P: n/a
Jimbo <ji***@notexist.domain.com> wrote:
See http://www.springframework.org then - it's a framework which
(amongst its many other benefits) makes AOP pretty simple to use. We
use it for logging and translating exceptions at work.


Pretty neat stuff. I might download it and have a little play. Plus it
is using AOP for the only two scenarios I have come across, namely
logging and exceptions.


No - it's not Spring that's using it for logging and exceptions - it's
our code which is using it for logging and exceptions, taking advantage
of the Spring support for AOP.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 17 '05 #10

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