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NUnit Documenting the test

P: n/a
I have an NUnit test plan with well over 500 tests.

I now need to produce a test plan document for these tests -
documenting them one by one with Word is a painfull task.

I was thinking that there must be a automated way of doing this - maybe
by using NDoc (although available formats don't seem particilariy
suited)?

Ideally the test plan would be produced with a section for every test
class with subsections for Setup/teardown and for each individual test.
This should all be produced in a single (or few) documents.

Does anyone have any ideas?

Nov 16 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
By the way I've seen NUnit2Report and NUnitReport - nice tools but
these are for documenting the test results - I need something that
documents the tests.

For example, rather than:

myClassTest.Connection - Passed.

I need

myClassTest

Tests done on the class responsible for blah, blah,

Connection

Check that the class can connect sucessfully.

Nov 16 '05 #2

P: n/a
never tried it, but is there any reason that you can't just use the XMLDoc
documentation? Since NUnit tests are simply methods of a test fixture,
would this suffice for what you need?

Are you using NUnit tests for a formalized testing process? That's unusual.
(not right or wrong... I just haven't seen it done). The reason is that
unit tests are usually done by developers to (a) drive the development to a
good stopping point (TDD), and (b) insure that they know when a change to
functionality has broken something... they are not normally used for code
coverage, functional testing, or integration testing, where test plans are
more often used.

--
--- Nick Malik [Microsoft]
MCSD, CFPS, Certified Scrummaster
http://blogs.msdn.com/nickmalik

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed in this forum are my own, and not
representative of my employer.
I do not answer questions on behalf of my employer. I'm just a
programmer helping programmers.
--
<ge*****************@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:11**********************@l41g2000cwc.googlegr oups.com...
By the way I've seen NUnit2Report and NUnitReport - nice tools but
these are for documenting the test results - I need something that
documents the tests.

For example, rather than:

myClassTest.Connection - Passed.

I need

myClassTest

Tests done on the class responsible for blah, blah,

Connection

Check that the class can connect sucessfully.

Nov 16 '05 #3

P: n/a
Nick,

Thanks for the reply.

Using the XMLDoc stuff seems to be the way to go so far. But I'm not
finding an easy way to do it. My test methods are all "doc"ed up
correctly but it means I have to write a complex bit of XSLT to turn
that into a single test doc.

I was just wondering if anyone had done something similar before to
give me a headstart?

My ideal would be an NUnit option to pick up the summary information
and store it in the results XML. That could then be picked up by
NUnit2Report and be displayed in the resulting test report.

We are using NUnit tests for the formal testing process. The project
being tested is a fairly complex class library and not an application.
So all we can really do is unit tests and a few simple usage scenarios.
What we can't do is anticipate the infinite number of ways the API
calls can be called by users using our API. So a functional or
integration test isn't really applicable to what we need to do (but
would be for the teams using our API). So for the unit tests and usage
scenarios NUnit works well.

I'd be interested to know how Microsoft deals with testing the .Net
framework.

Code coverage is tested & we ensure our NUnit tests cover all code
paths.

Cheers
Geoff

Nov 16 '05 #4

P: n/a
Hello Geoff,

I know that it can be tough to transform the XMLDoc stuff to a word
document. You may want to consider transforming the XML to RTF and then
loading it into Word. This article may help.
http://support.microsoft.com/default...b;en-us;311461

There may also be some commercial tools around. I did a quick msn search
and hit "Doc-o-matic" from toolsfactory (a bit pricey at $499, but if you
are writing code, this could pay for itself).

Your use of NUnit makes sense now that you explain that you are developing a
class library.

I cannot speak to details of internal methods used within MS to test the
framework. I can say that automation is used heavily.

--
--- Nick Malik [Microsoft]
MCSD, CFPS, Certified Scrummaster
http://blogs.msdn.com/nickmalik

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed in this forum are my own, and not
representative of my employer.
I do not answer questions on behalf of my employer. I'm just a
programmer helping programmers.
--
<ge*****************@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:11*********************@f14g2000cwb.googlegro ups.com...
Nick,

Thanks for the reply.

Using the XMLDoc stuff seems to be the way to go so far. But I'm not
finding an easy way to do it. My test methods are all "doc"ed up
correctly but it means I have to write a complex bit of XSLT to turn
that into a single test doc.

I was just wondering if anyone had done something similar before to
give me a headstart?

My ideal would be an NUnit option to pick up the summary information
and store it in the results XML. That could then be picked up by
NUnit2Report and be displayed in the resulting test report.

We are using NUnit tests for the formal testing process. The project
being tested is a fairly complex class library and not an application.
So all we can really do is unit tests and a few simple usage scenarios.
What we can't do is anticipate the infinite number of ways the API
calls can be called by users using our API. So a functional or
integration test isn't really applicable to what we need to do (but
would be for the teams using our API). So for the unit tests and usage
scenarios NUnit works well.

I'd be interested to know how Microsoft deals with testing the .Net
framework.

Code coverage is tested & we ensure our NUnit tests cover all code
paths.

Cheers
Geoff

Nov 16 '05 #5

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