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C# BOOK

Hello there,
Anyone has come a cross a good book in C#?
the best books( I hope they are ) that i found so far are:

-Programming C#, Third Edition, by Jesse Liberty <--- good, but some
discouraging reviews
-C# Complete, by Sybex <---- doesn't touch on Interfaces
-Murach's C#(.Net Developer), by Joel Murach, Doug Lowe <---- doesn't touch
on Threading

I appreciate your honest opinion.
Nov 16 '05 #1
26 2327
Get Troelsen's book!
http://www.apress.com/book/bookDisplay.html?bID=129
http://www.apress.com/book/bookDisplay.html?bID=390
"Mark" <ma*********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Ss********************@rogers.com...
Hello there,
Anyone has come a cross a good book in C#?
the best books( I hope they are ) that i found so far are:

-Programming C#, Third Edition, by Jesse Liberty <--- good, but some
discouraging reviews
-C# Complete, by Sybex <---- doesn't touch on Interfaces
-Murach's C#(.Net Developer), by Joel Murach, Doug Lowe <---- doesn't touch on Threading

I appreciate your honest opinion.

Nov 16 '05 #2
HI

Mr personally I like the Deitel style, www.deitel.com and their series of
books on (language name) How to Program, like C# How to Program

They have a style that works for me, I really like how they highlight words
in the text that are keywords. Otherwise join a dotnet developers group in
your area, sometimes authors of excellent books show up

I got the one C# book from ebay for 1/2 price, brand new

You can also request the various books from your library (it might take
several days to get books) but then check them out and see what works for
you.

Also highly recommended is the language spec from Microsoft
"Mark" <ma*********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Ss********************@rogers.com...
Hello there,
Anyone has come a cross a good book in C#?
the best books( I hope they are ) that i found so far are:

-Programming C#, Third Edition, by Jesse Liberty <--- good, but some
discouraging reviews
-C# Complete, by Sybex <---- doesn't touch on Interfaces
-Murach's C#(.Net Developer), by Joel Murach, Doug Lowe <---- doesn't touch on Threading

I appreciate your honest opinion.

Nov 16 '05 #3
I like the style in Liberty's books, but I find the level of material a bit
depressing. the Complete book is decent overall. Have not looked at Murach's
book (apologies)

Troelson writes a nice book, as does Gunnerson and Heiljberg, but I do not
think you are looking for language syntax alone, so neither will likely
thrill you. For understanding underneath the hood, Richter's book is great,
but it is not a programming book.

Another person recommended Deitel, which is a good option in many cases. I
have only run a cursory run through the book in B&N, so I cannot really
recommend or discourage. Their other works have always been top knotch.

--
Gregory A. Beamer
MVP; MCP: +I, SE, SD, DBA

*************************************************
Think outside the box!
*************************************************
"Mark" <ma*********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Ss********************@rogers.com...
Hello there,
Anyone has come a cross a good book in C#?
the best books( I hope they are ) that i found so far are:

-Programming C#, Third Edition, by Jesse Liberty <--- good, but some
discouraging reviews
-C# Complete, by Sybex <---- doesn't touch on Interfaces
-Murach's C#(.Net Developer), by Joel Murach, Doug Lowe <---- doesn't
touch on Threading

I appreciate your honest opinion.

Nov 16 '05 #4
Personally, I don't like the Deitel style. I used to... C how to
program was a near bible when it came out, but they simply have too
much competition now (better competition).

I love almost all Apress books like the one above. For getting started
and a good long term book, I like the Wrox Professional C# book. For
advanced stuff, I like the Apress C# book (it speeds a little more
through the basics than the Wrox book I think)

-dave

Nov 16 '05 #5
Inside C#, Second Edition
(http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...7482797-426392
8)

"Mark" <ma*********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Ss********************@rogers.com...
Hello there,
Anyone has come a cross a good book in C#?
the best books( I hope they are ) that i found so far are:

-Programming C#, Third Edition, by Jesse Liberty <--- good, but some
discouraging reviews
-C# Complete, by Sybex <---- doesn't touch on Interfaces
-Murach's C#(.Net Developer), by Joel Murach, Doug Lowe <---- doesn't touch
on Threading

I appreciate your honest opinion.

Nov 16 '05 #6
"Mark" <ma*********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Ss********************@rogers.com...
Hello there,
Anyone has come a cross a good book in C#?
the best books( I hope they are ) that i found so far are:


I see someone likes the boldface words in Deitel :))

Joe Mayo's book (C# Unleashed) is good and very thorough.

Deitel and Deitel are long-winded and boring;
their examples are exasperating; their use of boldface
is a failed effort to create textual differentiation.

Jesse Liberty's Learning C# is good and concise.

I have compared the three books and would say
for starters, read Liberty. But if you like a bit more
flesh read Mayo.

If you are a fast learner, and if you are near a
library with a photocopier, copy the first 100
pages of Cooper's C# Design Patterns. Don't
bother with the rest of the book though.

Mayo has a website with a tutorial that
covers the C# basics.

Nov 16 '05 #7
Deitel books are boring? nonsense, they have a specific 'style' some people
simply do not like. Im upset that I cant find all 4 bees on the cover of
the book I have. 3 are easy to find but the 4th? I give up.

code is code.

C# isnt the first language to ever have existed, so taking the concepts of
how to manipulate code to accomplish results is what books do.

We get the language spec free from Microsoft, I think the ANSI C spec costs
$250?

Im trying to write a new programming book, you put personality into it.
Some like it, others dont

"Zach" <wa********@all.here> wrote in message
news:61***************************@freeler.nl...
"Mark" <ma*********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Ss********************@rogers.com...
Hello there,
Anyone has come a cross a good book in C#?
the best books( I hope they are ) that i found so far are:


I see someone likes the boldface words in Deitel :))

Joe Mayo's book (C# Unleashed) is good and very thorough.

Deitel and Deitel are long-winded and boring;
their examples are exasperating; their use of boldface
is a failed effort to create textual differentiation.

Jesse Liberty's Learning C# is good and concise.

I have compared the three books and would say
for starters, read Liberty. But if you like a bit more
flesh read Mayo.

If you are a fast learner, and if you are near a
library with a photocopier, copy the first 100
pages of Cooper's C# Design Patterns. Don't
bother with the rest of the book though.

Mayo has a website with a tutorial that
covers the C# basics.

Nov 16 '05 #8

"Mark" <ma*********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Ss********************@rogers.com...
Hello there,
Anyone has come a cross a good book in C#?
the best books( I hope they are ) that i found so far are:

-Programming C#, Third Edition, by Jesse Liberty <--- good, but some
discouraging reviews
-C# Complete, by Sybex <---- doesn't touch on Interfaces
-Murach's C#(.Net Developer), by Joel Murach, Doug Lowe <---- doesn't
touch on Threading

I appreciate your honest opinion.

Hello Mark,

My recommendations:

The C# Programming Language, Anders Hejlsberg, Addison-Wesley Professional,
ISBN: 0321154916
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...glance&s=books
Language specification and explanation by the author of C#.
------------------------------------------------------
Begining C#, Karli Watson (et al), Wrox Press, ISBN: 0764543822
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...glance&s=books
Good primer
------------------------------------------------------
Professional C#, Third Edition, Simon Robinson (et al), Wrox Press, ISBN:
0764557599
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...books&n=507846
Excellent reference.
------------------------------------------------------
Windows Forms Programming in C#, Chris Sells, Addison-Wesley Professional,
ISBN: 0321116208
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...532219-0975809
GUI goodness, Charles Petzolds' book is good also.
------------------------------------------------------
Other related recommendations:

Applied Microsoft.NET Framework Programming, Jeffrey Richter, Microsoft
Press, ISBN: 0735614229
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...glance&s=books
"Run as..." hero.
------------------------------------------------------
Programming Microsoft ASP.NET, Dino Esposito, Microsoft Press, ISBN:
0735619034
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...glance&s=books
Awesome.
------------------------------------------------------
J. Buelna, Houston, TX
Nov 16 '05 #9
"Bradley1234" <so*****@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:A4Dxd.2354$2X6.2079@trnddc07...
Im trying to write a new programming book, you put personality into it.
Some like it, others dont


It depends what you mean by personality. Normally I'd say that is the
last thing you want in a textbook, which is a learning instrument, not a
novel.

Nov 16 '05 #10
On 20/12/2004 Zach wrote:
"Bradley1234" <so*****@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:A4Dxd.2354$2X6.2079@trnddc07...
Im trying to write a new programming book, you put personality into
it. Some like it, others dont


It depends what you mean by personality. Normally I'd say that is the
last thing you want in a textbook, which is a learning instrument,
not a novel.


Yes, and you need to avoid the patronising jokey style used in some
books, the worst example I've seen being Holzner's VB6 Black Book.

--
Jeff Gaines
Posted with XanaNews 1.16.5.2
Nov 16 '05 #11
Zach,

I hope I can share the book draft or published one here for comments, Id
welcome yours for sure,
and I have not seen Holzners VB6 black book, "jokey" style? no, Id agree,
Donald Knuth in his books seems to have this also, so I avoid them. When
Im coding and many hours go by, this.coder gets more irritable and that kind
of humor isnt appreciated.

Its simple, examples that work and minimum text. //
"Jeff Gaines" <wh*********@newsgroup.nospam> wrote in message
news:xn***************@news.microsoft.com...
On 20/12/2004 Zach wrote:
"Bradley1234" <so*****@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:A4Dxd.2354$2X6.2079@trnddc07...
Im trying to write a new programming book, you put personality into
it. Some like it, others dont


It depends what you mean by personality. Normally I'd say that is the
last thing you want in a textbook, which is a learning instrument,
not a novel.


Yes, and you need to avoid the patronising jokey style used in some
books, the worst example I've seen being Holzner's VB6 Black Book.

--
Jeff Gaines
Posted with XanaNews 1.16.5.2

Nov 16 '05 #12
If you're already an experienced programmer, with plenty of C/C++ under your
belt, then "Programming C#" is a great choice. It covers what you need to
know about C#'s constructs, syntax, and features that will be new to you,
without boring you to tears with any crap about how for() loops work and
such.

If you're not an experienced programmer, then "Learning C#" is the better
choice. It covers much more of the fundamental computer science side of
learning to use C# than "Programming C#" does.

Then, because you'll almost certainly want to write some windows apps at
some point, go get Chris Sells "Windows Forms Programming in C#" because
it's one of the better ramp-ups on windows forms programming I've seen.

If you really care about how C# works under the covers, down in the Common
Language Runtime, or if you need to do anything crazy like write a device
driver, get "Essential .NET" by Don Box.

Then, because eventually everybody eventually wants to write some sort of
dynamic website / web service, get an ASP .NET book as well. I haven't
gotten to that stage myself, so I can't give you a personal recommendation
there, but I'll probably take a look at Jesse Liberty's "Programming ASP
..NET 2nd edition" and "Essential ASP .NET" by Fritz Onion.
"Mark" <ma*********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Ss********************@rogers.com...
Hello there,
Anyone has come a cross a good book in C#?
the best books( I hope they are ) that i found so far are:

-Programming C#, Third Edition, by Jesse Liberty <--- good, but some
discouraging reviews
-C# Complete, by Sybex <---- doesn't touch on Interfaces
-Murach's C#(.Net Developer), by Joel Murach, Doug Lowe <---- doesn't
touch on Threading

I appreciate your honest opinion.

Nov 16 '05 #13
On Mon, 20 Dec 2004 16:28:16 GMT, "Bradley1234" <so*****@yahoo.com>
wrote:
Deitel books are boring? nonsense, they have a specific 'style' some people
simply do not like. Im upset that I cant find all 4 bees on the cover of
the book I have. 3 are easy to find but the 4th? I give up.

Bradley,

3 bugs are easy to find (as they're printed in black). The 4th one (on
C# A programmer's introduction) can be found just below the bridge
(left pilar, near the X), printed as a transparent 'golden' bug. :-)
Mark,

Go for Deitel,they give lots of clear examples, and their explanation
on OOP and inheritance is crystal clear. They only repeat the
essential stuff when needed and get you on the way for easy
understanding of a topic. Each chapter ends with a summary and
exercises. Deitel really takes you by the hand and guides you through
the beautiful C#-land. Perhaps the individualists among us find this
boring, I don't know.

The Deitel C# series come in 3 flavours:

- C# how to program (for the complete novice)
- C# A programmer's introduction (if you come from Delphi or ..)
- C# for experienced programmers (very detailed)

Anyway, the 2nd book is the one that did it for me - I now keep it
as a reference book.

Chris
Nov 16 '05 #14

If you really care about how C# works under the covers, down in the Common
Language Runtime, or if you need to do anything crazy like write a device
driver, get "Essential .NET" by Don Box.


Yes, but how to find this book? Im in Central California and am having
difficulty finding it
Nov 16 '05 #15
"Chris" <no****@nospam.be> wrote in message
news:go********************************@4ax.com...
Deitel really takes you by the hand and guides you through
the beautiful C#-land. Perhaps the individualists among us find this
boring, I don't know.


They demonstrate how not to write a textbook, that is all that
is wrong with their books.
Nov 16 '05 #16
On Wed, 22 Dec 2004 12:59:50 +0100, "Zach" <wa********@all.here>
wrote:

They demonstrate how not to write a textbook, that is all that
is wrong with their books.


For me the Deitel series are like lectures, with examples, remarks and
all the things one gets when following a course. Where other books
failed, Deitel did his work in teaching me C#.NET.

It seems that "de gustibus non disputandum est" is very appropriate
when choosing a book...

Happy coding,

Chris
Nov 16 '05 #17
"Chris" <no****@nospam.be> wrote in message
news:rf********************************@4ax.com...
On Wed, 22 Dec 2004 12:59:50 +0100, "Zach" <wa********@all.here>
wrote:

They demonstrate how not to write a textbook, that is all that
is wrong with their books.


For me the Deitel series are like lectures, with examples, remarks and
all the things one gets when following a course. Where other books
failed, Deitel did his work in teaching me C#.NET.

It seems that "de gustibus non disputandum est" is very appropriate
when choosing a book...

Happy coding,


Yes you are right, there are good and bad lecturers.
Nov 16 '05 #18
the best way to save some money is buy a basic book, learn it for 25
days, and return it for a moderate level book, after 25 days, return
that one. And, get a advance C# book and if you think u picked a good
advance book, keep it... unless you can return that one and get
another advance book...

I usually pick Borders or Barns and Noobles Book store, they usually
dont give me much of a hasstle..

Nov 16 '05 #19
On 23/12/2004 pachanga wrote:
the best way to save some money is buy a basic book, learn it for 25
days, and return it for a moderate level book, after 25 days, return
that one. And, get a advance C# book and if you think u picked a good
advance book, keep it... unless you can return that one and get
another advance book...

I usually pick Borders or Barns and Noobles Book store, they usually
dont give me much of a hasstle..


I do the same with my food.
Buy it, chew it for a while, then return it for a replacement.

--
Jeff Gaines
Posted with XanaNews 1.17.1.2 http://www.wilsonc.demon.co.uk/delphi.htm
Nov 16 '05 #20
Hello pachanga,
the best way to save some money is buy a basic book, learn it for 25
days, and return it for a moderate level book, after 25 days, return
that one. And, get a advance C# book and if you think u picked a good
advance book, keep it... unless you can return that one and get
another advance book...


Don't you think the authors deserve to be compensated for their work? By paying for it (and not returning it), you're also encouraging them to write other books.
Nov 16 '05 #21
Bradley1234 wrote:
I got the one C# book from ebay for 1/2 price, brand new


Hmmm, bear in mind that in spite of the price of computer books, the author
gets very little. If you buy a book second hand then the author will get
nothing. Would you like to spend 6 months of your life working on a book and
get very little for it?

If you buy a book second hand then why not send a buck or two to the author,
(that would be equivalent to the royalty he would get on a full price book)
to encourage the author to continue writing.

Richard
--
www.richardgrimes.com
my email ev******@zicf.bet is encrypted with ROT13 (www.rot13.org)
Nov 16 '05 #22
Richard Grimes [MVP] wrote:
If you buy a book second hand then why not send a buck or two to the author,
(that would be equivalent to the royalty he would get on a full price book)
to encourage the author to continue writing.


I don't think computer book authors will get rich either way.

If a person buys a book then it comes with an understood "fair use"
permission which includes the right to sell it.

One example of "unfair use" would be distributing a copy of a book in
PDF form over the Internet.

Eric
Nov 16 '05 #23
"Eric" <Er**@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Richard Grimes [MVP] wrote:
If you buy a book second hand then why not send a buck or two to the
author, (that would be equivalent to the royalty he would get on a full
price book) to encourage the author to continue writing.
I don't think computer book authors will get rich either way.

If a person buys a book then it comes with an understood "fair use"
permission which includes the right to sell it.


You are absolutely right about this. I was just asking you to think a little
further and consider that computer books do take a lot of time and effort. I
was pointing out that people should consider buying the new book first, and
go to the second hand market only if the new book is not available. But its
your conscience...
One example of "unfair use" would be distributing a copy of a book in PDF
form over the Internet.


Very true, and it happens all too often.

Richard
--
www.richardgrimes.com
my email ev******@zicf.bet is encrypted with ROT13 (www.rot13.org)
Nov 16 '05 #24
Is it just as bad as downloading music from the internet?

To me writing a book is not about making money. It's the passion of learning
and strengthening my learning even more by distributing knowledge - the only
thing that grows when you give out more of.

I just started my second and I intend to do a damn good job :)

- Sahil Malik
http://www.dotnetjunkies.com/weblog/sahilmalik

"Richard Grimes [MVP]" <read my sig> wrote in message
news:ed**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
"Eric" <Er**@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Richard Grimes [MVP] wrote:
If you buy a book second hand then why not send a buck or two to the
author, (that would be equivalent to the royalty he would get on a full
price book) to encourage the author to continue writing.


I don't think computer book authors will get rich either way.

If a person buys a book then it comes with an understood "fair use"
permission which includes the right to sell it.


You are absolutely right about this. I was just asking you to think a
little further and consider that computer books do take a lot of time and
effort. I was pointing out that people should consider buying the new book
first, and go to the second hand market only if the new book is not
available. But its your conscience...
One example of "unfair use" would be distributing a copy of a book in PDF
form over the Internet.


Very true, and it happens all too often.

Richard
--
www.richardgrimes.com
my email ev******@zicf.bet is encrypted with ROT13 (www.rot13.org)

Nov 16 '05 #25
On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 22:51:42 -0500, Eric <Er**@nospam.com> wrote:
Richard Grimes [MVP] wrote:
If you buy a book second hand then why not send a buck or two to the author,
(that would be equivalent to the royalty he would get on a full price book)
to encourage the author to continue writing.


I don't think computer book authors will get rich either way.

If a person buys a book then it comes with an understood "fair use"
permission which includes the right to sell it.


That's correct, of course. On the other hand, some real experts are
taking the time to hand off their expertise with relatively little
monetary gain. I suppose that Richard's reputation for writing excellent
books doesn't hurt his consulting fees (or whatever else he does to make a
living) but I understand what he is saying.

Mr.Grimes also doesn't get paid for taking considerable time to help
others with problems that they post here (I can testify).

_B

PS: Uh-oh...now I suppose I have to write him a check. Damn.

Nov 16 '05 #26

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