By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
426,115 Members | 898 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 426,115 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

c# books

P: n/a
Hi guys,

I am a daily average user of C# but I think I need to masterize the language
a little bit more to get full use of it and be able to do better
programming. I find myself programming the same way I did years ago.
I haev a basic understanding of OOP and do not need an introduction book for
pple who comes from procedural langauges. I never wrote any program in any
procedural languages anyway.

Before programming in C#, I wrote prorgrams in JAVA (my first programming
language). At that time, I read "Thinking in "Java" by Bruce Eckel (my first
programming book) and I loved that book. I liked the way the author presents
each topic simply and then start going deeper into the subject, making the
reader not just merely know how to program things but actually making him
understand the topic deeply, making the reader understand its philsophy.
Thus making the reader able to masterise the topic.
I have browsed a few C# books but never found an equivalent, then my
questions is: Is there anyone knowing a C# book from an author with a
similar approach of "Thinking in Java"? Too bad Bruce Eckel does not write a
C# book! I think for a good book, not only the techincal skills are
important but also the pedagogic skills. Like a tennis player does not need
a trainer who plays better than him but rather someone who can teach him
well.

Thanks,
Francois

Nov 16 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
6 Replies


P: n/a
Hi,

Personally I prefer an out-and-out reference book, but if you want
something that can clue you in on the subtleties of things you might
already know, try some of the MCAD/MCSD exam books. While the focus
isn't necessarily directly always on C#, it will give you more insight
into the base class libraries and so on, stuff you might never pick up
on your own.

I think you will definately get some redundancy in what you have
already learned regardless of what books you read. Which is the reason
I prefer reference books! Still, I am going through one of the
Microsoft Press books on MCAD for windows apps and I've found lots of
small things here and there that I never knew of and also entire other
ways of doing things. But perhaps this is just indicative of the fact
that I am a crap programmer... :P

Best of luck,
Steve

Nov 16 '05 #2

P: n/a
Hi Steven,

Thanks for your quick reply. I will definitly have a look at the exam books,
but what reference book do u advise me? The Microsoft Visual C# .NET
Language Reference from MS Press?

Tx a lot !

Francois

"Steven Nagy" <le*********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@c13g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
Hi,

Personally I prefer an out-and-out reference book, but if you want
something that can clue you in on the subtleties of things you might
already know, try some of the MCAD/MCSD exam books. While the focus
isn't necessarily directly always on C#, it will give you more insight
into the base class libraries and so on, stuff you might never pick up
on your own.

I think you will definately get some redundancy in what you have
already learned regardless of what books you read. Which is the reason
I prefer reference books! Still, I am going through one of the
Microsoft Press books on MCAD for windows apps and I've found lots of
small things here and there that I never knew of and also entire other
ways of doing things. But perhaps this is just indicative of the fact
that I am a crap programmer... :P

Best of luck,
Steve

Nov 16 '05 #3

P: n/a
IMHO I do not as a rule like the MSPRESS books although I do tend to buy
them because you always think they are a safe bet when buying without
browsing.
As far as exams are concerned, I have found the QUE MCAD books to be very
good.
As far as OOP is concerned then this book is IMO the best bar none
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/...139847-8241263
It does demonstrate examples in other languages (including C#) but this only
seems to make it even more interesting an valuable.

You need to check in a book shop first that this is the latest edition
because previous ones did not include C#.

Best Regards,

mark.
"Francois" <fr******@bettinghouses.com_NOSPAM> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Hi Steven,

Thanks for your quick reply. I will definitly have a look at the exam
books,
but what reference book do u advise me? The Microsoft Visual C# .NET
Language Reference from MS Press?

Tx a lot !

Francois

"Steven Nagy" <le*********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@c13g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
Hi,

Personally I prefer an out-and-out reference book, but if you want
something that can clue you in on the subtleties of things you might
already know, try some of the MCAD/MCSD exam books. While the focus
isn't necessarily directly always on C#, it will give you more insight
into the base class libraries and so on, stuff you might never pick up
on your own.

I think you will definately get some redundancy in what you have
already learned regardless of what books you read. Which is the reason
I prefer reference books! Still, I am going through one of the
Microsoft Press books on MCAD for windows apps and I've found lots of
small things here and there that I never knew of and also entire other
ways of doing things. But perhaps this is just indicative of the fact
that I am a crap programmer... :P

Best of luck,
Steve


Nov 16 '05 #4

P: n/a
Francois,

I think that a good book for your needs would be "Programming .NET
Components" by Juval Lowy. The book is geared towards an understanding of
the things in .NET which are essential to any development in .NET, going
into an insane amount of detail on the subject (things like mulithreading,
security, remoting, the dispose pattern, events, and quite a few others).

You can find it on Amazon at (watch for line wrap):

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...books&n=507846

Hope this helps.
--
- Nicholas Paldino [.NET/C# MVP]
- mv*@spam.guard.caspershouse.com

"Francois" <fr******@bettinghouses.com_NOSPAM> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Hi guys,

I am a daily average user of C# but I think I need to masterize the
language
a little bit more to get full use of it and be able to do better
programming. I find myself programming the same way I did years ago.
I haev a basic understanding of OOP and do not need an introduction book
for
pple who comes from procedural langauges. I never wrote any program in any
procedural languages anyway.

Before programming in C#, I wrote prorgrams in JAVA (my first programming
language). At that time, I read "Thinking in "Java" by Bruce Eckel (my
first
programming book) and I loved that book. I liked the way the author
presents
each topic simply and then start going deeper into the subject, making the
reader not just merely know how to program things but actually making him
understand the topic deeply, making the reader understand its philsophy.
Thus making the reader able to masterise the topic.
I have browsed a few C# books but never found an equivalent, then my
questions is: Is there anyone knowing a C# book from an author with a
similar approach of "Thinking in Java"? Too bad Bruce Eckel does not write
a
C# book! I think for a good book, not only the techincal skills are
important but also the pedagogic skills. Like a tennis player does not
need
a trainer who plays better than him but rather someone who can teach him
well.

Thanks,
Francois

Nov 16 '05 #5

P: n/a
I agree that the QUE MCAD Training Guides are the best around as did nearly
a dozen other members of a local study group who assessed available choices
when we decided which books to use to prepare for MCAD certification.

As a life long learner who has also worked as an instructor I find books
that teach concepts using multiple languages to be a waste of time and money
as they only confuse the student who is most likely not familiar with the
keywords, syntax, and grammar of various languages and thus never gains the
deep insight into how the code actually works as he or she simply can not
understand the process logic involved.

Finally, Eckel did write "Thinking in C#" but was apparently prevented from
publishing by the corporate slimesters who 'own' the phrase "Thinking in
...."

Why Eckel did not seek another publisher is a mystery that I can only
surmise may be related to that of my own experiences when working with the
slime from the print publishing industry.

--
<%= Clinton Gallagher, "Twice the Results -- Half the Cost"
Architectural & e-Business Consulting -- Software Development
NET cs*********@REMOVETHISTEXTmetromilwaukee.com
URL http://www.metromilwaukee.com/clintongallagher/

"Mark Broadbent" <no****@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:uL**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
IMHO I do not as a rule like the MSPRESS books although I do tend to buy
them because you always think they are a safe bet when buying without
browsing.
As far as exams are concerned, I have found the QUE MCAD books to be very
good.
As far as OOP is concerned then this book is IMO the best bar none
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/...139847-8241263 It does demonstrate examples in other languages (including C#) but this only seems to make it even more interesting an valuable.

You need to check in a book shop first that this is the latest edition
because previous ones did not include C#.

Best Regards,

mark.
"Francois" <fr******@bettinghouses.com_NOSPAM> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Hi Steven,

Thanks for your quick reply. I will definitly have a look at the exam
books,
but what reference book do u advise me? The Microsoft Visual C# .NET
Language Reference from MS Press?

Tx a lot !

Francois

"Steven Nagy" <le*********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@c13g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
Hi,

Personally I prefer an out-and-out reference book, but if you want
something that can clue you in on the subtleties of things you might
already know, try some of the MCAD/MCSD exam books. While the focus
isn't necessarily directly always on C#, it will give you more insight
into the base class libraries and so on, stuff you might never pick up
on your own.

I think you will definately get some redundancy in what you have
already learned regardless of what books you read. Which is the reason
I prefer reference books! Still, I am going through one of the
Microsoft Press books on MCAD for windows apps and I've found lots of
small things here and there that I never knew of and also entire other
ways of doing things. But perhaps this is just indicative of the fact
that I am a crap programmer... :P

Best of luck,
Steve



Nov 16 '05 #6

P: n/a
I strongly recommend Andrew Troelsen's C# and the .NET Platform 2nd edition

"Francois" <fr******@bettinghouses.com_NOSPAM> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Hi Steven,

Thanks for your quick reply. I will definitly have a look at the exam books, but what reference book do u advise me? The Microsoft Visual C# .NET
Language Reference from MS Press?

Tx a lot !

Francois

"Steven Nagy" <le*********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@c13g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
Hi,

Personally I prefer an out-and-out reference book, but if you want
something that can clue you in on the subtleties of things you might
already know, try some of the MCAD/MCSD exam books. While the focus
isn't necessarily directly always on C#, it will give you more insight
into the base class libraries and so on, stuff you might never pick up
on your own.

I think you will definately get some redundancy in what you have
already learned regardless of what books you read. Which is the reason
I prefer reference books! Still, I am going through one of the
Microsoft Press books on MCAD for windows apps and I've found lots of
small things here and there that I never knew of and also entire other
ways of doing things. But perhaps this is just indicative of the fact
that I am a crap programmer... :P

Best of luck,
Steve


Nov 16 '05 #7

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.