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Has anyone typed up an index for the O'Reilly book "C# and VB.NET Conversion?"

P: n/a

Has anyone typed up an index for the O'Reilly book "C# and VB.NET
Conversion?"

I'm just learning C#, and often using this little book to see which
VB.NET terms translate directly to some term in C#. However, it's a
real hassle that the book has no index, just a table of contents.

For example, as early as page 8, the book teaches that C#'s "using"
statement is the equivalent of VB.NET's "imports" statement. However,
that concept can't be looked up using the keywords "using" or
"imports" (like, say, in an index).

Instead, you'd have to go to the table of contents and guess that you
need the section called "Namespace Declaration and Usage."
If I want a translation for VB.NET's "friend" or C#'s "internal," I
have to mentally tranlsate that to the table of contents entry "Member
Scope." And what about "void" and "sub" and so on?
What's odd is that people are complaining about this in their
Amazon.com reviews of the book, but it seems like the author (or
anyone) could type up an alpahabetical list of terms and their pages
in about one hour.

In fact, the reason that I'm posting is that I decided I'd type up
that list myself, for my own use. But then I wondered if someone else
hasn't already done exactly the same thing.

Anyone?

Dim.........................10
Imports......................8
new (instance of a class)...11
out (parameter).............15
semicolon....................5
using........................8

etc.

That took me about 5 minutes, and I'm already a tenth of the way
through the book! So, before I continue...

Has anyone typed up a full index for the O'Reilly book "C# and VB.NET
Conversion?"
Thanks.
Nov 16 '05 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
Dgates <dg****@spamlinkline.com> wrote:
Has anyone typed up an index for the O'Reilly book "C# and VB.NET
Conversion?"

I'm just learning C#, and often using this little book to see which
VB.NET terms translate directly to some term in C#. However, it's a
real hassle that the book has no index, just a table of contents.


There are various other resources available. See

http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/faq/#vb.comparison

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 16 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Thu, 12 Aug 2004 13:20:52 -0700, Dgates <dg****@spamlinkline.com>
wrote:

Has anyone typed up an index for the O'Reilly book "C# and VB.NET
Conversion?"

I'm just learning C#, and often using this little book to see which
VB.NET terms translate directly to some term in C#. However, it's a
real hassle that the book has no index, just a table of contents.

For example, as early as page 8, the book teaches that C#'s "using"
statement is the equivalent of VB.NET's "imports" statement. However,
that concept can't be looked up using the keywords "using" or
"imports" (like, say, in an index).

Instead, you'd have to go to the table of contents and guess that you
need the section called "Namespace Declaration and Usage."
If I want a translation for VB.NET's "friend" or C#'s "internal," I
have to mentally tranlsate that to the table of contents entry "Member
Scope." And what about "void" and "sub" and so on?
What's odd is that people are complaining about this in their
Amazon.com reviews of the book, but it seems like the author (or
anyone) could type up an alpahabetical list of terms and their pages
in about one hour.

In fact, the reason that I'm posting is that I decided I'd type up
that list myself, for my own use. But then I wondered if someone else
hasn't already done exactly the same thing.

Anyone?

Dim.........................10
Imports......................8
new (instance of a class)...11
out (parameter).............15
semicolon....................5
using........................8

etc.

That took me about 5 minutes, and I'm already a tenth of the way
through the book! So, before I continue...

Has anyone typed up a full index for the O'Reilly book "C# and VB.NET
Conversion?"
Thanks.

By the way, this came up most recently when I kept hearing people use
the word "hashtable." I glanced at a description of C#'s hashtable
and thought, "Hmm, this looks like VB.NET's 'SortedList'!"

Neither word was in the table of contents of my little translator
book, so I started guessing what concept might contain them. "D for
Dictionary?... No... Something in the section on arrays??... No..."
Nov 16 '05 #3

P: n/a
i'm a big fan of the o'reilly collection, most of the books i have are
in pdf version and for instance if your looking for a VB term like
imports i would press ctrl + f, and that will pull up a search dialog
box and it will take you to every instance of the word in the document,
sometimes it can take a while, but it should be easier than the way your
doing it

Dgates wrote:
On Thu, 12 Aug 2004 13:20:52 -0700, Dgates <dg****@spamlinkline.com>
wrote:

Has anyone typed up an index for the O'Reilly book "C# and VB.NET
Conversion?"

I'm just learning C#, and often using this little book to see which
VB.NET terms translate directly to some term in C#. However, it's a
real hassle that the book has no index, just a table of contents.

For example, as early as page 8, the book teaches that C#'s "using"
statement is the equivalent of VB.NET's "imports" statement. However,
that concept can't be looked up using the keywords "using" or
"imports" (like, say, in an index).

Instead, you'd have to go to the table of contents and guess that you
need the section called "Namespace Declaration and Usage."
If I want a translation for VB.NET's "friend" or C#'s "internal," I
have to mentally tranlsate that to the table of contents entry "Member
Scope." And what about "void" and "sub" and so on?
What's odd is that people are complaining about this in their
Amazon.com reviews of the book, but it seems like the author (or
anyone) could type up an alpahabetical list of terms and their pages
in about one hour.

In fact, the reason that I'm posting is that I decided I'd type up
that list myself, for my own use. But then I wondered if someone else
hasn't already done exactly the same thing.

Anyone?

Dim.........................10
Imports......................8
new (instance of a class)...11
out (parameter).............15
semicolon....................5
using........................8

etc.

That took me about 5 minutes, and I'm already a tenth of the way
through the book! So, before I continue...

Has anyone typed up a full index for the O'Reilly book "C# and VB.NET
Conversion?"
Thanks.


By the way, this came up most recently when I kept hearing people use
the word "hashtable." I glanced at a description of C#'s hashtable
and thought, "Hmm, this looks like VB.NET's 'SortedList'!"

Neither word was in the table of contents of my little translator
book, so I started guessing what concept might contain them. "D for
Dictionary?... No... Something in the section on arrays??... No..."

Nov 16 '05 #4

P: n/a

I suppose so. But there's something so nice about grabbing a BOOK! A
little paper thing! Just to be able to back away from the computer
for a little bit, walk somewhere else and look at a BOOK!

(My goal, with a typed index, is that it would be printed on 1 or 2
pages and then folded inside the book.)


On Thu, 12 Aug 2004 13:56:32 -0700, TommyBoy <na*********@hotmail.com>
wrote:
i'm a big fan of the o'reilly collection, most of the books i have are
in pdf version and for instance if your looking for a VB term like
imports i would press ctrl + f, and that will pull up a search dialog
box and it will take you to every instance of the word in the document,
sometimes it can take a while, but it should be easier than the way your
doing it

Dgates wrote:
On Thu, 12 Aug 2004 13:20:52 -0700, Dgates <dg****@spamlinkline.com>
wrote:

Has anyone typed up an index for the O'Reilly book "C# and VB.NET
Conversion?"

I'm just learning C#, and often using this little book to see which
VB.NET terms translate directly to some term in C#. However, it's a
real hassle that the book has no index, just a table of contents.

For example, as early as page 8, the book teaches that C#'s "using"
statement is the equivalent of VB.NET's "imports" statement. However,
that concept can't be looked up using the keywords "using" or
"imports" (like, say, in an index).

Instead, you'd have to go to the table of contents and guess that you
need the section called "Namespace Declaration and Usage."
If I want a translation for VB.NET's "friend" or C#'s "internal," I
have to mentally tranlsate that to the table of contents entry "Member
Scope." And what about "void" and "sub" and so on?
What's odd is that people are complaining about this in their
Amazon.com reviews of the book, but it seems like the author (or
anyone) could type up an alpahabetical list of terms and their pages
in about one hour.

In fact, the reason that I'm posting is that I decided I'd type up
that list myself, for my own use. But then I wondered if someone else
hasn't already done exactly the same thing.

Anyone?

Dim.........................10
Imports......................8
new (instance of a class)...11
out (parameter).............15
semicolon....................5
using........................8

etc.

That took me about 5 minutes, and I'm already a tenth of the way
through the book! So, before I continue...

Has anyone typed up a full index for the O'Reilly book "C# and VB.NET
Conversion?"
Thanks.


By the way, this came up most recently when I kept hearing people use
the word "hashtable." I glanced at a description of C#'s hashtable
and thought, "Hmm, this looks like VB.NET's 'SortedList'!"

Neither word was in the table of contents of my little translator
book, so I started guessing what concept might contain them. "D for
Dictionary?... No... Something in the section on arrays??... No..."


Nov 16 '05 #5

P: n/a
On Thu, 12 Aug 2004 21:25:52 +0100, Jon Skeet [C# MVP]
<sk***@pobox.com> wrote:
Dgates <dg****@spamlinkline.com> wrote:
Has anyone typed up an index for the O'Reilly book "C# and VB.NET
Conversion?"

I'm just learning C#, and often using this little book to see which
VB.NET terms translate directly to some term in C#. However, it's a
real hassle that the book has no index, just a table of contents.


There are various other resources available. See

http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/faq/#vb.comparison

That's pretty nice, all right -- despite my wish for something I can
hold in my hand. I bookmarked it, to be sure.

Thanks.

Nov 16 '05 #6

P: n/a
I'd rather look at a book any second of the day, but i'm still a junior
developer, i don't make enough to buy them, so all i have are downloaded
ebooks
Dgates wrote:
I suppose so. But there's something so nice about grabbing a BOOK! A
little paper thing! Just to be able to back away from the computer
for a little bit, walk somewhere else and look at a BOOK!

(My goal, with a typed index, is that it would be printed on 1 or 2
pages and then folded inside the book.)


On Thu, 12 Aug 2004 13:56:32 -0700, TommyBoy <na*********@hotmail.com>
wrote:

i'm a big fan of the o'reilly collection, most of the books i have are
in pdf version and for instance if your looking for a VB term like
imports i would press ctrl + f, and that will pull up a search dialog
box and it will take you to every instance of the word in the document,
sometimes it can take a while, but it should be easier than the way your
doing it

Dgates wrote:

On Thu, 12 Aug 2004 13:20:52 -0700, Dgates <dg****@spamlinkline.com>
wrote:

Has anyone typed up an index for the O'Reilly book "C# and VB.NET
Conversion?"

I'm just learning C#, and often using this little book to see which
VB.NET terms translate directly to some term in C#. However, it's a
real hassle that the book has no index, just a table of contents.

For example, as early as page 8, the book teaches that C#'s "using"
statement is the equivalent of VB.NET's "imports" statement. However,
that concept can't be looked up using the keywords "using" or
"imports" (like, say, in an index).

Instead, you'd have to go to the table of contents and guess that you
need the section called "Namespace Declaration and Usage."
If I want a translation for VB.NET's "friend" or C#'s "internal," I
have to mentally tranlsate that to the table of contents entry "Member
Scope." And what about "void" and "sub" and so on?
What's odd is that people are complaining about this in their
Amazon.com reviews of the book, but it seems like the author (or
anyone) could type up an alpahabetical list of terms and their pages
in about one hour.

In fact, the reason that I'm posting is that I decided I'd type up
that list myself, for my own use. But then I wondered if someone else
hasn't already done exactly the same thing.

Anyone?

Dim.........................10
Imports......................8
new (instance of a class)...11
out (parameter).............15
semicolon....................5
using........................8

etc.

That took me about 5 minutes, and I'm already a tenth of the way
through the book! So, before I continue...

Has anyone typed up a full index for the O'Reilly book "C# and VB.NET
Conversion?"
Thanks.

By the way, this came up most recently when I kept hearing people use
the word "hashtable." I glanced at a description of C#'s hashtable
and thought, "Hmm, this looks like VB.NET's 'SortedList'!"

Neither word was in the table of contents of my little translator
book, so I started guessing what concept might contain them. "D for
Dictionary?... No... Something in the section on arrays??... No..."


Nov 16 '05 #7

P: n/a
Paper is so 20th century. ;)

I used to buy books, but never really as a reference, usualy more as a way
to learn new material. Recently I've been using the library of my university
instead.

MSDN and the C# language reference documents
(http://msdn.microsoft.com/vcsharp/team/language/) are probably the two
things I look at the most. For anything else, there's Google.
Etienne Boucher
Nov 16 '05 #8

P: n/a
Etienne Boucher wrote:
Paper is so 20th century. ;)

I used to buy books, but never really as a reference, usualy more as a way
to learn new material. Recently I've been using the library of my university
instead.

MSDN and the C# language reference documents
(http://msdn.microsoft.com/vcsharp/team/language/) are probably the two
things I look at the most. For anything else, there's Google.
Etienne Boucher

if you need any electronic books just let me know, i have the whole
oreilly collection
Nov 16 '05 #9

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