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Books - C# for beginning programmers ?

P: n/a
What books would you recommend for students who want to learn programming in
C# and have not previously mastered a related language (Java, C++, Pascal,
etc.)?

--

Michael A. Covington - Artificial Intelligence Ctr - University of Georgia

"In the core C# language it is simply not possible to have an uninitialized
variable, a 'dangling' pointer, or an expression that indexes an array
beyond its bounds. Whole categories of bugs that routinely plague C and C++
programs are thus eliminated." - A. Hejlsberg, The C# Programming Language
Nov 16 '05 #1
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9 Replies


P: n/a
Michael A. Covington wrote:
What books would you recommend for students who want to learn programming in
C# and have not previously mastered a related language (Java, C++, Pascal,
etc.)?


Hi Michael,

Beginning C# from Jesse Liberty is a good start:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596003765/

Cheers

Arne Janning
Nov 16 '05 #2

P: n/a
http://www.softsteel.co.uk/tutorials/cSharp/patch.html

Cheaper than cheap...
"Michael A. Covington" <lo**@www.covingtoninnovations.com.for.address> wrote
in message news:ek**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
What books would you recommend for students who want to learn programming in C# and have not previously mastered a related language (Java, C++, Pascal,
etc.)?

--

Michael A. Covington - Artificial Intelligence Ctr - University of Georgia

"In the core C# language it is simply not possible to have an uninitialized variable, a 'dangling' pointer, or an expression that indexes an array
beyond its bounds. Whole categories of bugs that routinely plague C and C++ programs are thus eliminated." - A. Hejlsberg, The C# Programming Language

Nov 16 '05 #3

P: n/a
Thanks to all who have responded so far, and thanks in advance to those who
are going to!

Nov 16 '05 #4

P: n/a
Learning OOP languages can be very challenging. I suggest you start
with Deitel & Deitel textbooks [1] to learn about OOP and then apply
language constructs to Web Forms (ASP.NET) or Windows Forms
(Windows applications) derived from the .NET Framework also from
Deitel & Deitel. These are university level textbooks that can be
assessed at Barnes & Noble.

I also recommend you go right to the MCAD certification training
guides as they cover each element of the .NET Framework used
to develop web or windows development. Our Milwaukee Visual
Studio Developers Group did an assessment of such books and
without question determined the QUE training guides to be
outstanding [2].

Finally, there are several authors who are top notch one of them
being Jesse Liberty but as a rule I have found these experts rarely
cover the scope of OOP and the language constructs that neophytes
need to know about. The one exception IMO is the book by Andrew
Troelsen "C# and the .NET Platform" [3] which for some reason seems
to meld the level of expertise with what I feel is outstanding
readability.

I doubt anyone will argue that the best reference guides are from
someone other than WROX and O'Reilly. I favor WROX [4] as
I've found layout and page presentation more readable than O'Reilly
titles [5] with occassional variance the exception to the rule as both
publishers are technically superior. For example, WROX "C# Class
Design" is as near to a must have as any.

I have no recommendation on ADO.NET as of yet as I've yet to
finalize a determination myself. While there is some good stuff out
there I have yet to find any ADO title as outstanding as those I
have cited.

--
<%= Clinton Gallagher
A/E/C Consulting, Web Design, e-Commerce Software Development
Wauwatosa, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin USA
NET csgallagher@ REMOVETHISTEXT metromilwaukee.com
URL http://www.metromilwaukee.com/clintongallagher/

[1] http://www.deitel.com/
[2] http://www.quepublishing.com/
[3] http://www.apress.com/author/authorDisplay.html?aID=53
[4] http://www.wrox.com/
[5] http://www.oreilly.com/
"Michael A. Covington" <lo**@www.covingtoninnovations.com.for.address>
wrote in message news:ek**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
What books would you recommend for students who want to learn programming in C# and have not previously mastered a related language (Java, C++, Pascal, etc.)?

--

Michael A. Covington - Artificial Intelligence Ctr - University of Georgia
"In the core C# language it is simply not possible to have an uninitialized variable, a 'dangling' pointer, or an expression that indexes an array
beyond its bounds. Whole categories of bugs that routinely plague C and C++ programs are thus eliminated." - A. Hejlsberg, The C# Programming Language

Nov 16 '05 #5

P: n/a
Thanks. I should add that I am not the beginner. It's for some of my
students. I know C# and many other programming languages.

--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------
Michael A. Covington, Associate Director
Artificial Intelligence Center, The University of Georgia
http://www.ai.uga.edu/~mc

"clintonG" <csgallagher@RE************@metromilwaukee.com> wrote in message
news:%2***************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Learning OOP languages can be very challenging. I suggest you start
with Deitel & Deitel textbooks [1] to learn about OOP and then apply
language constructs to Web Forms (ASP.NET) or Windows Forms
(Windows applications) derived from the .NET Framework also from
Deitel & Deitel. These are university level textbooks that can be
assessed at Barnes & Noble.

I also recommend you go right to the MCAD certification training
guides as they cover each element of the .NET Framework used
to develop web or windows development. Our Milwaukee Visual
Studio Developers Group did an assessment of such books and
without question determined the QUE training guides to be
outstanding [2].

Finally, there are several authors who are top notch one of them
being Jesse Liberty but as a rule I have found these experts rarely
cover the scope of OOP and the language constructs that neophytes
need to know about. The one exception IMO is the book by Andrew
Troelsen "C# and the .NET Platform" [3] which for some reason seems
to meld the level of expertise with what I feel is outstanding
readability.

I doubt anyone will argue that the best reference guides are from
someone other than WROX and O'Reilly. I favor WROX [4] as
I've found layout and page presentation more readable than O'Reilly
titles [5] with occassional variance the exception to the rule as both
publishers are technically superior. For example, WROX "C# Class
Design" is as near to a must have as any.

I have no recommendation on ADO.NET as of yet as I've yet to
finalize a determination myself. While there is some good stuff out
there I have yet to find any ADO title as outstanding as those I
have cited.

--
<%= Clinton Gallagher
A/E/C Consulting, Web Design, e-Commerce Software Development
Wauwatosa, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin USA
NET csgallagher@ REMOVETHISTEXT metromilwaukee.com
URL http://www.metromilwaukee.com/clintongallagher/

[1] http://www.deitel.com/
[2] http://www.quepublishing.com/
[3] http://www.apress.com/author/authorDisplay.html?aID=53
[4] http://www.wrox.com/
[5] http://www.oreilly.com/
"Michael A. Covington" <lo**@www.covingtoninnovations.com.for.address>
wrote in message news:ek**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
What books would you recommend for students who want to learn

programming in
C# and have not previously mastered a related language (Java, C++,

Pascal,
etc.)?

--

Michael A. Covington - Artificial Intelligence Ctr - University of

Georgia

"In the core C# language it is simply not possible to have an

uninitialized
variable, a 'dangling' pointer, or an expression that indexes an array
beyond its bounds. Whole categories of bugs that routinely plague C

and C++
programs are thus eliminated." - A. Hejlsberg, The C# Programming

Language


Nov 16 '05 #6

P: n/a
I believe your students will be best served by using the Deitel and
Deitel
textbooks and think you will be remiss if you fail to at least evaluate
the works this father and son team are producing.

In fact, as of late and despite my awarness of the opportunity, I have
been lazy about not meandering through the bookstores of any of the
local univerisities that tout their CS programs.

So what has your problem been in this regard? Not want to be seen
crossing town to Georgia Tech to do a little window shopping? ;-)

--
<%= Clinton Gallagher
A/E/C Consulting, Web Design, e-Commerce Software Development
Wauwatosa, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin USA
NET csgallagher@ REMOVETHISTEXT metromilwaukee.com
URL http://www.metromilwaukee.com/clintongallagher/

"Michael A. Covington" <lo**@www.covingtoninnovations.com.for.address>
wrote in message news:uS**************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
Thanks. I should add that I am not the beginner. It's for some of my
students. I know C# and many other programming languages.

--
---------------------------------------------------------------------- ------ ---------
Michael A. Covington, Associate Director
Artificial Intelligence Center, The University of Georgia
http://www.ai.uga.edu/~mc

"clintonG" <csgallagher@RE************@metromilwaukee.com> wrote in message news:%2***************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Learning OOP languages can be very challenging. I suggest you start
with Deitel & Deitel textbooks [1] to learn about OOP and then apply
language constructs to Web Forms (ASP.NET) or Windows Forms
(Windows applications) derived from the .NET Framework also from
Deitel & Deitel. These are university level textbooks that can be
assessed at Barnes & Noble.

I also recommend you go right to the MCAD certification training
guides as they cover each element of the .NET Framework used
to develop web or windows development. Our Milwaukee Visual
Studio Developers Group did an assessment of such books and
without question determined the QUE training guides to be
outstanding [2].

Finally, there are several authors who are top notch one of them
being Jesse Liberty but as a rule I have found these experts rarely
cover the scope of OOP and the language constructs that neophytes
need to know about. The one exception IMO is the book by Andrew
Troelsen "C# and the .NET Platform" [3] which for some reason seems
to meld the level of expertise with what I feel is outstanding
readability.

I doubt anyone will argue that the best reference guides are from
someone other than WROX and O'Reilly. I favor WROX [4] as
I've found layout and page presentation more readable than O'Reilly
titles [5] with occassional variance the exception to the rule as both publishers are technically superior. For example, WROX "C# Class
Design" is as near to a must have as any.

I have no recommendation on ADO.NET as of yet as I've yet to
finalize a determination myself. While there is some good stuff out
there I have yet to find any ADO title as outstanding as those I
have cited.

--
<%= Clinton Gallagher
A/E/C Consulting, Web Design, e-Commerce Software Development Wauwatosa, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin USA
NET csgallagher@ REMOVETHISTEXT metromilwaukee.com
URL http://www.metromilwaukee.com/clintongallagher/

[1] http://www.deitel.com/
[2] http://www.quepublishing.com/
[3] http://www.apress.com/author/authorDisplay.html?aID=53
[4] http://www.wrox.com/
[5] http://www.oreilly.com/
"Michael A. Covington" <lo**@www.covingtoninnovations.com.for.address> wrote in message news:ek**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
What books would you recommend for students who want to learn

programming in
C# and have not previously mastered a related language (Java, C++,

Pascal,
etc.)?

--

Michael A. Covington - Artificial Intelligence Ctr - University of

Georgia

"In the core C# language it is simply not possible to have an

uninitialized
variable, a 'dangling' pointer, or an expression that indexes an array beyond its bounds. Whole categories of bugs that routinely plague
C and C++
programs are thus eliminated." - A. Hejlsberg, The C# Programming

Language



Nov 16 '05 #7

P: n/a
"clintonG" <csgallagher@RE************@metromilwaukee.com> wrote in message
news:ej*************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
I believe your students will be best served by using the Deitel and Deitel
textbooks and think you will be remiss if you fail to at least evaluate
the works this father and son team are producing.
Deitel, "C#: How to Program," struck me as marvelous. It may be a bit heavy
for casual study, but it would work very well in a classroom. I especially
like the way the authors warn you against common errors and misconceptions.

For what I'm actually recommending (for complete beginners doing directed
study), see:
http://www.covingtoninnovations.com/...ex.html#040529
In fact, as of late and despite my awarness of the opportunity, I have
been lazy about not meandering through the bookstores of any of the
local univerisities that tout their CS programs.

So what has your problem been in this regard? Not want to be seen
crossing town to Georgia Tech to do a little window shopping? ;-)


Georgia Tech is 75 miles away from me, though I do look through their
bookstores regularly. Our CS program teaches Java as the intro language,
and I'll bet theirs does too, but I haven't checked.

I was, however, in Gwinnett County today, and I scouted out some books
there. We have a good university bookstore in Athens, but it is being
remodeled over the summer and isn't entirely open.

Thanks to all who responded!

--

Michael A. Covington - Artificial Intelligence Ctr - University of Georgia

"In the core C# language it is simply not possible to have an uninitialized
variable, a 'dangling' pointer, or an expression that indexes an array
beyond its bounds. Whole categories of bugs that routinely plague C and C++
programs are thus eliminated." - A. Hejlsberg, The C# Programming Language
Nov 16 '05 #8

P: n/a
"Michael A. Covington" <lo**@www.covingtoninnovations.com.for.address>
wrote in news:ek**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl:
What books would you recommend for students who want to learn
programming in C# and have not previously mastered a related language
(Java, C++, Pascal, etc.)?


I have been looking at the Deital books and would agree that they would be
excellent in a directed environment - even on-line learning. Myself I am
using the Murach's C# book - which I find to be excellent in the way they
document things. It is useful as a learning tool and a reference due to the
style of writing.

The additional books I have now are C# Programmer Cookbook (Microsoft
Press: Jones) and Applied .Net Framework Programming (Microsoft Press:
Richter).

I have been programming in VB.Net for about a year and a half but making a
tranisition to C# right now. The Murach book is a little on the lite side
for experienced programmers but excellent for the beginners who are going
to be teaching themselves.
Nov 16 '05 #9

P: n/a
B P
Would anyone have recommendations for someone looking to migrate from
the C++/VB 6 world? The software I use has switched to the .NET
platform and I'd like to be able to migrate some of the older scripts
and forms I've created to the new software version.

I've taken a few classes in C++, VBA and Java and am also a fan of the
Dietel series.

Bart
Chas Profitt wrote:
"Michael A. Covington" <lo**@www.covingtoninnovations.com.for.address>
wrote in news:ek**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl:

What books would you recommend for students who want to learn
programming in C# and have not previously mastered a related language
(Java, C++, Pascal, etc.)?

I have been looking at the Deital books and would agree that they would be
excellent in a directed environment - even on-line learning. Myself I am
using the Murach's C# book - which I find to be excellent in the way they
document things. It is useful as a learning tool and a reference due to the
style of writing.

The additional books I have now are C# Programmer Cookbook (Microsoft
Press: Jones) and Applied .Net Framework Programming (Microsoft Press:
Richter).

I have been programming in VB.Net for about a year and a half but making a
tranisition to C# right now. The Murach book is a little on the lite side
for experienced programmers but excellent for the beginners who are going
to be teaching themselves.

Nov 16 '05 #10

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