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called uncompiled scripts from compiled code...

P: n/a
For some bespoke software, my client has stated that they'd like their
engineer guys to be able to configure, and muck around with the program we
give them. I don't like it, but what I think about it, does't really matter.

What are the ways to expose the code to them, so that they can change it on
the fly, and there's no need to have VS.Net or the .Net SDK installed
(unless parts of sdk are freely and easily redistributable).

- Is there a way I can call scripts from .Net... One way I thought was to
call into a .VBS file (or the like) and let that go off and perform a load
of functions and tasks etc, returning a value back when it's done.
- Another way I thought was to have the csc.exe at hand, and compile my
libraries at runtime, so that the source for some DLL's is lying around
ready to be edited, and when they are change, the code will recompile them
into the DLL's it's calling.

Perhaps there's a .Net way for doing all this?

Thanks for your time and feedback.

Dan.
Nov 15 '05 #1
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2 Replies


P: n/a
Look in Microsoft.Vsa namespace, particulary IVsaEngine, IVsaSite.

using this you will be able to compile scripts that use already instantiated
objects. Then you can use them using JScript
"Daniel Bass" <I'm really @ sick of spam> wrote in message
news:ep**************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
For some bespoke software, my client has stated that they'd like their
engineer guys to be able to configure, and muck around with the program we
give them. I don't like it, but what I think about it, does't really matter.
What are the ways to expose the code to them, so that they can change it on the fly, and there's no need to have VS.Net or the .Net SDK installed
(unless parts of sdk are freely and easily redistributable).

- Is there a way I can call scripts from .Net... One way I thought was to
call into a .VBS file (or the like) and let that go off and perform a load
of functions and tasks etc, returning a value back when it's done.
- Another way I thought was to have the csc.exe at hand, and compile my
libraries at runtime, so that the source for some DLL's is lying around
ready to be edited, and when they are change, the code will recompile them
into the DLL's it's calling.

Perhaps there's a .Net way for doing all this?

Thanks for your time and feedback.

Dan.

Nov 15 '05 #2

P: n/a
Cheers, I'll look into it.

Dan.

"Vadym Stetsyak" <pd****@ukr.net> wrote in message
news:un**************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
Look in Microsoft.Vsa namespace, particulary IVsaEngine, IVsaSite.

using this you will be able to compile scripts that use already instantiated
objects. Then you can use them using JScript
"Daniel Bass" <I'm really @ sick of spam> wrote in message
news:ep**************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
For some bespoke software, my client has stated that they'd like their
engineer guys to be able to configure, and muck around with the program we
give them. I don't like it, but what I think about it, does't really matter.
What are the ways to expose the code to them, so that they can change it on the fly, and there's no need to have VS.Net or the .Net SDK installed
(unless parts of sdk are freely and easily redistributable).

- Is there a way I can call scripts from .Net... One way I thought was to
call into a .VBS file (or the like) and let that go off and perform a load
of functions and tasks etc, returning a value back when it's done.
- Another way I thought was to have the csc.exe at hand, and compile my
libraries at runtime, so that the source for some DLL's is lying around
ready to be edited, and when they are change, the code will recompile them
into the DLL's it's calling.

Perhaps there's a .Net way for doing all this?

Thanks for your time and feedback.

Dan.


Nov 15 '05 #3

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