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Learning ADO.NET

P: n/a
From the walkthroughs I'm starting to get the impression that the only way
I'm going to be able to learn about ADO.NET is to go out and buy SQL Server
7.0.

I already own MS Access and don't have any desire to setup a full blown
server. Should I give up on learning ADO.NET or is there an alternative?
Nov 15 '05 #1
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P: n/a
Chuck Bowling wrote:
From the walkthroughs I'm starting to get the impression that the
only way I'm going to be able to learn about ADO.NET is to go out and
buy SQL Server 7.0.


First off, you can always program against Access using OLEDB. Even ODBC is
supported.

Secondly, MSDE is a sclaed-back version of SQL Server and is free. It's even
redistributable.

Finally, a copy of SQL Server 2000, Developer Edition will set you back a
whopping $49.

Considering that any commercial-scale web app will be using a true database
server, the skills you'd acquire learning to work with SQL Server are well
worth the investment.

--
There are 10 kinds of people. Those who understand binary and those who
don't.

http://code.acadx.com
(Pull the pin to reply)
Nov 15 '05 #2

P: n/a

"Chuck Bowling" <ch**********@sbcglobal-NO-SPAM.net> wrote in message
news:Or**************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
From the walkthroughs I'm starting to get the impression that the only way
I'm going to be able to learn about ADO.NET is to go out and buy SQL Server 7.0.

I already own MS Access and don't have any desire to setup a full blown
server. Should I give up on learning ADO.NET or is there an alternative?


Chuck, that's totally not the case. Like Frank mentions, MSDE is free and
will do most everything you'll need to do in a non-production environment.
Moreover, because ADO.NET has a close and kill model,I've found that it
plays much better with MS Access than classic ADO did. Moreover, you can
use free web services like Google (or build your own) or XML Documents as
your back end and totally bypass Access or SQL Server.

Don't let something this small discourage you! ADO.NET totally rocks, and
you'll learn to love it quickly. Besides, you can use ADO.NET with XML
exclusively, so the back end is irrelevant.
Nov 15 '05 #3

P: n/a

"William Ryan eMVP" <do********@comcast.nospam.net> wrote in message
news:%2****************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...

"Chuck Bowling" <ch**********@sbcglobal-NO-SPAM.net> wrote in message
news:Or**************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
From the walkthroughs I'm starting to get the impression that the only way I'm going to be able to learn about ADO.NET is to go out and buy SQL

Server
7.0.

I already own MS Access and don't have any desire to setup a full blown
server. Should I give up on learning ADO.NET or is there an alternative?


Chuck, that's totally not the case. Like Frank mentions, MSDE is free and
will do most everything you'll need to do in a non-production environment.
Moreover, because ADO.NET has a close and kill model,I've found that it
plays much better with MS Access than classic ADO did. Moreover, you can
use free web services like Google (or build your own) or XML Documents as
your back end and totally bypass Access or SQL Server.

Don't let something this small discourage you! ADO.NET totally rocks, and
you'll learn to love it quickly. Besides, you can use ADO.NET with XML
exclusively, so the back end is irrelevant.

Thanks for the encouragement and information William. Actually I wasn't
planning on giving up. Just a minor burp of frustration at the
walkthroughs... :)
Nov 15 '05 #4

P: n/a

"Frank Oquendo" <fr****@acadxpin.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
Chuck Bowling wrote:
From the walkthroughs I'm starting to get the impression that the
only way I'm going to be able to learn about ADO.NET is to go out and
buy SQL Server 7.0.
First off, you can always program against Access using OLEDB. Even ODBC is
supported.

Secondly, MSDE is a sclaed-back version of SQL Server and is free. It's

even redistributable.

Finally, a copy of SQL Server 2000, Developer Edition will set you back a
whopping $49.

Considering that any commercial-scale web app will be using a true database server, the skills you'd acquire learning to work with SQL Server are well
worth the investment.

--
There are 10 kinds of people. Those who understand binary and those who
don't.


Thanks for the info Frank. I didn't realize that Server was that cheap.

As to working with a commercial-scale web app I'm currently not moving in
that direction but I guess it wouldn't hurt to keep the options open..
Nov 15 '05 #5

P: n/a
Thanks Tu, I'll look into it...

"Tu-Thach" <tu*****@antispam.ongtech.com> wrote in message
news:9D**********************************@microsof t.com...
Chuck,
You can use OleDb provider to work with MS Access.

Tu-Thach

----- Chuck Bowling wrote: -----

From the walkthroughs I'm starting to get the impression that the only way I'm going to be able to learn about ADO.NET is to go out and buy SQL Server 7.0.

I already own MS Access and don't have any desire to setup a full blown server. Should I give up on learning ADO.NET or is there an alternative?

Nov 15 '05 #6

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