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Communication via shared memory space [webcontrols, NT Sessions, UI]

P: n/a
Hi gang,

I have somewhat of a complicated question. I will try my best to
explain. I have .NET assemblies that run in IIS's memory space. But I want
to be able to interface with those running instances from a user's logon
session on the host server. Basically I want to write a UI that allow a
server administrator to see what is happening at runtime and be able to
control the assemblies. I know of three basic ways to get this done:

1) write a web UI and allow him to interface via an administrative web page
that accesses the app via the "Application" variables in .ASPX forms

2) bridge the gap via a database like a local .MDB

3) bridge the gap via TCP connections to the local loopback address
127.0.0.1 with TcpClient and TcpListener.

But I want to do it through and API or memory space. No offence but these
way seem to be workarounds for this type of controlling/interfacing. Does
..NET facilitate this functionality or am I going to have to settle for the
three mentioned options? Is there a way to share the memory space in a .NET
dll so I can change settings at run time? I mean in how do MSExcnahge and
IIS admin tools do it anyway? Lots of good questions here, I sincerely hope
someone can answer them.

- Rashad Rivera

Department of State/NCC


Nov 15 '05 #1
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2 Replies


P: n/a
Let me get this right. You have web applications using your .NET
assemblies. You want to control those assemblies with some kind of
"administrator" control. Right?

You listed some possibilities (you forgot a few... I like MSMQ as a way of
sending messages back and forth between applications, and of course, don't
forget web services as a way to have a server hold a message cache).

However, the best way to approach this is by using .NET Remoting. You
create an administrative object on your server and each of your .NET
assemblies would contact the server object to communicate with it. The
admin console would simply be another client of the server object... it
would simply have different privileges (or perhaps, it is simply the only
client app that makes use of the administrative methods you provide... no
point in making this harder than it has to be).

I believe that it is possible to set up your clients to get events sent by
the server. The possibilities are endless.

I recommend the book "Advanced .NET Remoting" by Ingo Rammer. The book goes
into solid examples in a well-written and quite readable style.

HTH,
--- Nick

"Rashad Rivera" <rashadrivera@NO_____SPAM__.hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Hi gang,

I have somewhat of a complicated question. I will try my best to
explain. I have .NET assemblies that run in IIS's memory space. But I want to be able to interface with those running instances from a user's logon
session on the host server. Basically I want to write a UI that allow a
server administrator to see what is happening at runtime and be able to
control the assemblies. I know of three basic ways to get this done:

1) write a web UI and allow him to interface via an administrative web page that accesses the app via the "Application" variables in .ASPX forms

2) bridge the gap via a database like a local .MDB

3) bridge the gap via TCP connections to the local loopback address
127.0.0.1 with TcpClient and TcpListener.

But I want to do it through and API or memory space. No offence but these
way seem to be workarounds for this type of controlling/interfacing. Does
.NET facilitate this functionality or am I going to have to settle for the
three mentioned options? Is there a way to share the memory space in a ..NET dll so I can change settings at run time? I mean in how do MSExcnahge and
IIS admin tools do it anyway? Lots of good questions here, I sincerely hope someone can answer them.

- Rashad Rivera

Department of State/NCC

Nov 15 '05 #2

P: n/a
I can offer you a commercial solution. My product "Professional Validation
And More" is a replacement to Microsoft's validators that overcomes its many
limitations. For example, it includes properties to show a Confirm
messagebox as part of submitting a page. Learn more at
http://www.peterblum.com/vam/home.aspx.
--- Peter Blum
www.PeterBlum.com
Email: PL****@PeterBlum.com

"Rashad Rivera" <rashadrivera@NO_____SPAM__.hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Hi gang,

I have somewhat of a complicated question. I will try my best to
explain. I have .NET assemblies that run in IIS's memory space. But I want to be able to interface with those running instances from a user's logon
session on the host server. Basically I want to write a UI that allow a
server administrator to see what is happening at runtime and be able to
control the assemblies. I know of three basic ways to get this done:

1) write a web UI and allow him to interface via an administrative web page that accesses the app via the "Application" variables in .ASPX forms

2) bridge the gap via a database like a local .MDB

3) bridge the gap via TCP connections to the local loopback address
127.0.0.1 with TcpClient and TcpListener.

But I want to do it through and API or memory space. No offence but these
way seem to be workarounds for this type of controlling/interfacing. Does
.NET facilitate this functionality or am I going to have to settle for the
three mentioned options? Is there a way to share the memory space in a ..NET dll so I can change settings at run time? I mean in how do MSExcnahge and
IIS admin tools do it anyway? Lots of good questions here, I sincerely hope someone can answer them.

- Rashad Rivera

Department of State/NCC

Nov 15 '05 #3

This discussion thread is closed

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