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Book recommendation request

P: n/a
I asked this before, although several months ago, and I want to make sure
the recommendation hasn't changed.

I'm a developer who is working on a Web application, but most of my work is
at the very low end of the system, below the business objects, providing
core functionality. I've read Advanced .NET Remoting, C# and the .Net
framework, Performance Tuning and Optimizing ASP.NET Applications. I have a
strong background in C and C++ (as well as a smattering in Java, Pascal,
etc.) so I don't need a beginners book.

I think I need a book which will talk to me about the core of C#'s
libraries, and what kind of basic functionality it offers to get various
work done efficiently.

When I last asked this question, I was told that Jeffrey Richter's Applied
Microsoft .NET Framework Programming would be a good choice. Is that still
a good choice?

--
Reginald Blue
"I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as my
telephone. My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use my
telephone."
- Bjarne Stroustrup (originator of C++) [quoted at the 2003 International
Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces]
Nov 15 '05 #1
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9 Replies


P: n/a
I haven't read Richter's book yet though I know he is
usually very good. I just finished Don
Box's "Essential .NET" and my review is: pay attention
during the first 5 chapters so that you can keep up when
your eyes get opened during the last 5 chapters...

--Richard

-----Original Message-----
I asked this before, although several months ago, and I want to make surethe recommendation hasn't changed.

I'm a developer who is working on a Web application, but most of my work isat the very low end of the system, below the business objects, providingcore functionality. I've read Advanced .NET Remoting, C# and the .Netframework, Performance Tuning and Optimizing ASP.NET Applications. I have astrong background in C and C++ (as well as a smattering in Java, Pascal,etc.) so I don't need a beginners book.

I think I need a book which will talk to me about the core of C#'slibraries, and what kind of basic functionality it offers to get variouswork done efficiently.

When I last asked this question, I was told that Jeffrey Richter's AppliedMicrosoft .NET Framework Programming would be a good choice. Is that stilla good choice?

--
Reginald Blue
"I have always wished that my computer would be as easy to use as mytelephone. My wish has come true. I no longer know how to use mytelephone."
- Bjarne Stroustrup (originator of C++) [quoted at the 2003 InternationalConference on Intelligent User Interfaces]
.

Nov 15 '05 #2

P: n/a
100

"Richard" <ri******@amgen.com> wrote in message
news:1f*****************************@phx.gbl...
I haven't read Richter's book yet though I know he is
usually very good. I just finished Don
Box's "Essential .NET" and my review is: pay attention
during the first 5 chapters so that you can keep up when
your eyes get opened during the last 5 chapters...

My recomentation is:
1. If one don't have any ideia what c# is any lightweight book about c#
just to understand the examples is necessary.
2. Jeffrey Richter's "Applied Microsoft .NET Framework Programming" and
Charles Petzold's "Programming Windows with c#"
3. Don Box's "Essential .NET". As Don Box says himself at the beginning
of the book Jeffrey Richter or alike should be read prior to his book.
4. Even it is not releared to .NET Jeffrey Richter's Advanced Windows (3rd
Ed) would be of verry big help. Understanding of windows processes, threads,
messages would be of real help as long as the current platform is win2k or
winXP. For Web application it is not necessary I believe.

I believe these are good start.

HTH
B\rgds
100
Nov 15 '05 #3

P: n/a
"Reginald Blue" wrote:
I asked this before, although several months ago, and I want to make
sure the recommendation hasn't changed.
[...] When I last asked this question, I was told that Jeffrey Richter's
Applied Microsoft .NET Framework Programming would be a good choice.
Is that still a good choice?


Absolutely. IMHO a .NET must-read.

Cheers,
--
Joerg Jooss
jo*********@gmx.net
Nov 15 '05 #4

P: n/a
"Reginald Blue" wrote:
I asked this before, although several months ago, and I want to make
sure the recommendation hasn't changed.
[...] When I last asked this question, I was told that Jeffrey Richter's
Applied Microsoft .NET Framework Programming would be a good choice.
Is that still a good choice?


Absolutely. IMHO a .NET must-read.

Cheers,
--
Joerg Jooss
jo*********@gmx.net
Nov 15 '05 #5

P: n/a
I so agree, the only book, IMHO, worth reading on the subject. Actually
admits that MSFT in not the only game in town. (The O'reilly book really
SUCKS)
Joerg Jooss wrote:
"Reginald Blue" wrote:

I asked this before, although several months ago, and I want to make
sure the recommendation hasn't changed.


[...]
When I last asked this question, I was told that Jeffrey Richter's
Applied Microsoft .NET Framework Programming would be a good choice.
Is that still a good choice?

Absolutely. IMHO a .NET must-read.

Cheers,


Nov 15 '05 #6

P: n/a
I so agree, the only book, IMHO, worth reading on the subject. Actually
admits that MSFT in not the only game in town. (The O'reilly book really
SUCKS)
Joerg Jooss wrote:
"Reginald Blue" wrote:

I asked this before, although several months ago, and I want to make
sure the recommendation hasn't changed.


[...]
When I last asked this question, I was told that Jeffrey Richter's
Applied Microsoft .NET Framework Programming would be a good choice.
Is that still a good choice?

Absolutely. IMHO a .NET must-read.

Cheers,


Nov 15 '05 #7

P: n/a

"batman1990" wrote in message news:hpWfb.44539$%h1.29208@sccrnsc02...
...The O'reilly book really SUCKS)


I'm not sure which O'Reilly book you mean, but I can tell you that
Programming C# (3rd Edition) has been fully updated for 1.1. and I support
it on my web site with an errata, source code and a link to a private
support discussion area. It has been the #1 book on C# on Amazon for nearly
a year, and Amazon's own independent reviewer called it "An adept and
extremely well conceived guide to the C# language". Barnes and Noble's
reviewer wrote "You can't beat Liberty for clarity and simplicity, and you
can't beat his Programming C# for thorougness, either." They went on to say
that the book shows "extraordinary clarity" and uses "well -crafted
examples."

While I certainly respect your right to dislike a book, you used pretty
harsh language, so forgive me if I try to provide the other side. In any
case, the interested reader can find a sample chapter on my web site:
http://www.LibertyAssociates.com, where you can buy the book at a 30%
discount and find extensive supporting material.

Thanks.

--
Jesse Liberty, President
Liberty Associates, Inc.
http://www.LibertyAssociates.com
Programming, training & consulting.
Nov 15 '05 #8

P: n/a
Sorry Jesse, I think I actually met you before, the book that I hated
was ".NET Framework Essentials, 3rd Edition" sorry for the general slam.
I'll check out your book

Jesse Liberty wrote:
"batman1990" wrote in message news:hpWfb.44539$%h1.29208@sccrnsc02...
...The O'reilly book really SUCKS)

I'm not sure which O'Reilly book you mean, but I can tell you that
Programming C# (3rd Edition) has been fully updated for 1.1. and I support
it on my web site with an errata, source code and a link to a private
support discussion area. It has been the #1 book on C# on Amazon for nearly
a year, and Amazon's own independent reviewer called it "An adept and
extremely well conceived guide to the C# language". Barnes and Noble's
reviewer wrote "You can't beat Liberty for clarity and simplicity, and you
can't beat his Programming C# for thorougness, either." They went on to say
that the book shows "extraordinary clarity" and uses "well -crafted
examples."

While I certainly respect your right to dislike a book, you used pretty
harsh language, so forgive me if I try to provide the other side. In any
case, the interested reader can find a sample chapter on my web site:
http://www.LibertyAssociates.com, where you can buy the book at a 30%
discount and find extensive supporting material.

Thanks.


Nov 15 '05 #9

P: n/a
No problem, I look forward to hearing what you think of it.

-j

--
Jesse Liberty, President
Liberty Associates, Inc.
http://www.LibertyAssociates.com
"batman1990" <ig****@me.org> wrote in message
news:geogb.509204$Oz4.362470@rwcrnsc54...
Sorry Jesse, I think I actually met you before, the book that I hated
was .... I'll check out your book

Jesse Liberty wrote:


Nov 15 '05 #10

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