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.NET equivalent to java JMS

P: n/a
Does .NET have an equivalent to java's JMS messaging. I'm not a java
programmer but as I understand it a java application can be setup to pass
entire objects between processes. Is there some sort of equivalent in .NET?

I have a meeting on Monday to discuss the direction we plan to go with one
of our major products. This discussion is going to be dealing mostly with
front end applications. I want to argue the .NET point. There are going to
be proponents of java there too and I want to be prepared.

Any other point/counter points you guys can think of would be appreciated.

I'm not trying to argue which is better, just which one makes more sense for
us to use.

jim
Nov 15 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
Jim H wrote:
Does .NET have an equivalent to java's JMS messaging. I'm not a java
programmer but as I understand it a java application can be setup to
pass entire objects between processes. Is there some sort of
equivalent in .NET?
Yes, of course we have that in .NET :). On windows you have MSMQ. You can
use this from the .NET framework with the System.Messaging namespace. Look
it up at MSDN. However, for communication between processes we have .NET
remoting! Check that out too on MSDN.
I have a meeting on Monday to discuss the direction we plan to go
with one of our major products. This discussion is going to be
dealing mostly with front end applications. I want to argue the .NET
point. There are going to be proponents of java there too and I want
to be prepared.
Good luck! If they're promoting cross-platform compatibility, check out Mono
at www.go-mono.com
Any other point/counter points you guys can think of would be
appreciated.


The next OS (Longhorn) will be majorly depending on .NET and will have many
new features. If you want to take advantage of those then, you've got to be
on the .NET side, who knows how long it will take to be part of Java. If
Java still runs on windows then ;)
Nov 15 '05 #2

P: n/a

"Jim H" <no****@jimsaccount.com> wrote in message
news:eb**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Does .NET have an equivalent to java's JMS messaging. I'm not a java
programmer but as I understand it a java application can be setup to pass entire objects between processes. Is there some sort of equivalent in ..NET?
I have a meeting on Monday to discuss the direction we plan to go with one of our major products. This discussion is going to be dealing mostly with front end applications. I want to argue the .NET point. There are going to be proponents of java there too and I want to be prepared.

Any other point/counter points you guys can think of would be appreciated.
I'm not trying to argue which is better, just which one makes more sense for us to use.


Windows NT 4 SP3 (4?), Windows 2000, Windows XP, and
Windows 2003 server all come with Microsoft Message
Queuing Service which is accessible via the
System.Messaging namespace. This is a very
high-powered and scalable Enterprise-class
asynchronous messaging system that is on the
same playing field as IBM's MQSeries.

JMS is an attempt to provide platform-independent
message queuing for Java without having to
use specific products like MSMQ or IBM's
MQSeries.

I would definately recommend using MSMQ for
a queuing solution.

However, are you just trying to do IPC in
..NET? .NET Remoting is a good way of passing
objects between processes, but it's not
a very scalable solution (it doesn't work
well if you have 100 servers all distributing
load, for example). If you have two apps
that run side-by-side on a box or on two
seperate boxes, remoting can be pretty fast.

Also, consider web services. They can be
fast and very scalable (since they run on
IIS).

I'm not sure what specific problem you're
trying to solve, so I can't be more specific.

-c
Nov 15 '05 #3

P: n/a
Hi Jim,

Do the posts by Rob and Chad answer your questions?

If you have any Qs, please reply to this post.
--
Parker Zhang
Microsoft Developer Support

This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

Nov 15 '05 #4

P: n/a
They answered the questions.

Thanks to all who replyed. The meeting went well.

Jim

"Parker Zhang [MSFT]" <pa******@online.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:zp**************@cpmsftngxa06.phx.gbl...
Hi Jim,

Do the posts by Rob and Chad answer your questions?

If you have any Qs, please reply to this post.
--
Parker Zhang
Microsoft Developer Support

This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

Nov 15 '05 #5

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