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SSE and MMX support in the JIT compiler

P: n/a
Hi,

I was wondering if anyone knows whether the JIT compiler supports
SSE/SSE2 instructions? Thanks

-Andre

Nov 15 '05 #1
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13 Replies


P: n/a
We currently use SSE2 for some things like the double to int cast, it's not
used for general codegen though.

--
David Notario
Software Design Engineer - CLR JIT Compiler
"Andre" <fo********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:3F**************@hotmail.com...
Hi,

I was wondering if anyone knows whether the JIT compiler supports
SSE/SSE2 instructions? Thanks

-Andre

Nov 15 '05 #2

P: n/a
We currently use SSE2 for some things like the double to int cast, it's not
used for general codegen though.

--
David Notario
Software Design Engineer - CLR JIT Compiler
"Andre" <fo********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:3F**************@hotmail.com...
Hi,

I was wondering if anyone knows whether the JIT compiler supports
SSE/SSE2 instructions? Thanks

-Andre

Nov 15 '05 #3

P: n/a
Thanks David,

There's one thing I need to ask you - were there a fair amount of
features/improvements in ver1.1 of the CLR compared to v1.0? I see that
total numebr of bytes JIT'd are noticeably less in ver1.1 and some
profiling showed that ver1.1 gave better MFLOPs in executing some
benchmarking code. Thanks

-Andre

David Notario wrote:
We currently use SSE2 for some things like the double to int cast, it's not
used for general codegen though.


Nov 15 '05 #4

P: n/a
Thanks David,

There's one thing I need to ask you - were there a fair amount of
features/improvements in ver1.1 of the CLR compared to v1.0? I see that
total numebr of bytes JIT'd are noticeably less in ver1.1 and some
profiling showed that ver1.1 gave better MFLOPs in executing some
benchmarking code. Thanks

-Andre

David Notario wrote:
We currently use SSE2 for some things like the double to int cast, it's not
used for general codegen though.


Nov 15 '05 #5

P: n/a
No, we didn't do much optimization work in the JIT for v1.1, except for some
very targetted ones that offered a significant speed boost in exchange for
little dev work (1.1 was mainly a security fixes only release for the CLR),
such as the double to int cast (40x speed increase by just using SSE2
instruction)

--
David Notario
Software Design Engineer - CLR JIT Compiler
"Andre" <fo********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:3F**************@hotmail.com...
Thanks David,

There's one thing I need to ask you - were there a fair amount of
features/improvements in ver1.1 of the CLR compared to v1.0? I see that
total numebr of bytes JIT'd are noticeably less in ver1.1 and some
profiling showed that ver1.1 gave better MFLOPs in executing some
benchmarking code. Thanks

-Andre

David Notario wrote:
We currently use SSE2 for some things like the double to int cast, it's not used for general codegen though.

Nov 15 '05 #6

P: n/a
Where I say security fixes for the CLR, I mean for the JIT, there were perf
improvements in other areas different than the JIT

--
David Notario
Software Design Engineer - CLR JIT Compiler
"David Notario" <dn******@online.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:eZ*************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
No, we didn't do much optimization work in the JIT for v1.1, except for some very targetted ones that offered a significant speed boost in exchange for
little dev work (1.1 was mainly a security fixes only release for the CLR), such as the double to int cast (40x speed increase by just using SSE2
instruction)

--
David Notario
Software Design Engineer - CLR JIT Compiler
"Andre" <fo********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:3F**************@hotmail.com...
Thanks David,

There's one thing I need to ask you - were there a fair amount of
features/improvements in ver1.1 of the CLR compared to v1.0? I see that
total numebr of bytes JIT'd are noticeably less in ver1.1 and some
profiling showed that ver1.1 gave better MFLOPs in executing some
benchmarking code. Thanks

-Andre

David Notario wrote:
We currently use SSE2 for some things like the double to int cast,
it's
not used for general codegen though.


Nov 15 '05 #7

P: n/a
Thanks David,

David Notario wrote:
No, we didn't do much optimization work in the JIT for v1.1, except for some
very targetted ones that offered a significant speed boost in exchange for
little dev work (1.1 was mainly a security fixes only release for the CLR),
such as the double to int cast (40x speed increase by just using SSE2
instruction)


So does that mean v1.0 didn't use SSE2 at all (and only used SSE?)? I
guess that's just why I see an increase in the number of FLOPS using v1.1.

If optimizations are being targetted to a particular platform.. does
that imply that there are other platforms .NET is being ported to? (I'm
only aware of Mono and that's on a x86) Does Microsoft plan on porting
..NET (or allow others) to Sun or any other platform for instance?

You mentioned that there have been some improvement in areas other than
the JIT.. could you name some? I'm trying to write up a report for my
company to convince them to completely switch to .NET from J2EE/J2SE and
for that I need to have solid reasoning and give accurate measurements
to show improvements in CLR v1.1 over v1.0. After a months study I'm
personally convinced that the CLR will improve (and some very
interesting features are being added to C# in the next release).. I
can't seem to find anything documented on the current implementation of
the CLR and Rotor, for that matter, is simply not worth studying (as the
optimizing compiler has bee stripped off from it). It would really help
me if you could shed a little more light on this please. Thanks again
for your time David,

-Andre
Nov 15 '05 #8

P: n/a
Andre <fo********@hotmail.com> wrote:
Is this also true for Whidbey, do you know? (And can you say? :)


What's Whidbey? (is that the code name for the next version of C#?)


I believe it's the next version of Visual Studio .NET, including the
next version of .NET itself, which will in turn support the features of
the next version of C# (such as generics).

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet/
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 15 '05 #9

P: n/a
Jon Skeet wrote:
Andre <fo********@hotmail.com> wrote:
Is this also true for Whidbey, do you know? (And can you say? :)


What's Whidbey? (is that the code name for the next version of C#?)

I believe it's the next version of Visual Studio .NET, including the
next version of .NET itself, which will in turn support the features of
the next version of C# (such as generics).

Ah.. catchy name :) Thanks Jon

-Andre

Nov 15 '05 #10

P: n/a
We've done more perf work in the JIT for out next version than for our
previous version, but we still won't be generating SSE2 or MMX code in our
codegen.

The rationale behind not doing SSE2 was that we didn't have the time to do a
vectorizing optimizations. If you use SSE2 for scalar operations, it's not
always faster than the equivalent x87 code in 'normal' code (adds and muls
have different latencies in SSE2 vs x87 (mul has lower latency in SSE2, but
add is higher, IIRC), plus some operations (casting from doubles to floats
or floats to doubles) are quite slow in SSE2 compared to x87. We also have
to support processors without SSE2.

So, with all these arguments against it, we decided to focus our work on
improving our x87 codegen and leaving the door open for an SSE2
implementation, instead of putting all our eggs in the SSE2 basket.

--
David Notario
Software Design Engineer - CLR JIT Compiler
"Jon Skeet" <sk***@pobox.com> wrote in message
news:MP************************@news.microsoft.com ...
David Notario <dn******@online.microsoft.com> wrote:
No, we didn't do much optimization work in the JIT for v1.1, except for some very targetted ones that offered a significant speed boost in exchange for little dev work (1.1 was mainly a security fixes only release for the CLR), such as the double to int cast (40x speed increase by just using SSE2
instruction)


Is this also true for Whidbey, do you know? (And can you say? :)

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.com>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet/
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too

Nov 15 '05 #11

P: n/a
Hello,
Is there any work being done on using specific features of a processor
to increase performance? For example, on AMD Athlon XPs, there are 4
integer execution pipelines. I can get a 500% decrease in time if I
do a loop like this:

int sums0=0, sums1=0, sums2=0, sums3=0, sums=0;
for(x=0;x<nums.Length/4;x+=4)
{
sums0+=nums[x];
sums1+=nums[x+1];
sums2+=nums[x+2];
sums3+=nums[x+3];
}
sums=(sums0+sums1)+(sums2+sums3);

where nums[] is an array of integers. I know this would be hard to
implement in the JIT, but isn't one of the (main) ideas behind the JIT
is the ability to do run-time optimizations for whatever platform the
code is running on?

Thanks,
Austin Ehlers
On Wed, 6 Aug 2003 00:32:41 -0700, "David Notario"
<dn******@online.microsoft.com> wrote:
We've done more perf work in the JIT for out next version than for our
previous version, but we still won't be generating SSE2 or MMX code in our
codegen.

The rationale behind not doing SSE2 was that we didn't have the time to do a
vectorizing optimizations. If you use SSE2 for scalar operations, it's not
always faster than the equivalent x87 code in 'normal' code (adds and muls
have different latencies in SSE2 vs x87 (mul has lower latency in SSE2, but
add is higher, IIRC), plus some operations (casting from doubles to floats
or floats to doubles) are quite slow in SSE2 compared to x87. We also have
to support processors without SSE2.

So, with all these arguments against it, we decided to focus our work on
improving our x87 codegen and leaving the door open for an SSE2
implementation, instead of putting all our eggs in the SSE2 basket.


Nov 15 '05 #12

P: n/a
What's the original code? I think you made a mistake in your unrolling and
you are effectively doing 4 times less work (loop condition should be
x<nums.Length)

We do take advantage of some processor features and generate different code
for different processors. We could get better there, though, but we also
have a finite amount of time. Also, any processor specifics add a lot of
work to our QA process.

--
David Notario
Software Design Engineer - CLR JIT Compiler
"Austin Ehlers" <th***********************@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:59********************************@4ax.com...
Hello,
Is there any work being done on using specific features of a processor
to increase performance? For example, on AMD Athlon XPs, there are 4
integer execution pipelines. I can get a 500% decrease in time if I
do a loop like this:

int sums0=0, sums1=0, sums2=0, sums3=0, sums=0;
for(x=0;x<nums.Length/4;x+=4)
{
sums0+=nums[x];
sums1+=nums[x+1];
sums2+=nums[x+2];
sums3+=nums[x+3];
}
sums=(sums0+sums1)+(sums2+sums3);

where nums[] is an array of integers. I know this would be hard to
implement in the JIT, but isn't one of the (main) ideas behind the JIT
is the ability to do run-time optimizations for whatever platform the
code is running on?

Thanks,
Austin Ehlers
On Wed, 6 Aug 2003 00:32:41 -0700, "David Notario"
<dn******@online.microsoft.com> wrote:
We've done more perf work in the JIT for out next version than for our
previous version, but we still won't be generating SSE2 or MMX code in ourcodegen.

The rationale behind not doing SSE2 was that we didn't have the time to do avectorizing optimizations. If you use SSE2 for scalar operations, it's notalways faster than the equivalent x87 code in 'normal' code (adds and mulshave different latencies in SSE2 vs x87 (mul has lower latency in SSE2, butadd is higher, IIRC), plus some operations (casting from doubles to floatsor floats to doubles) are quite slow in SSE2 compared to x87. We also haveto support processors without SSE2.

So, with all these arguments against it, we decided to focus our work on
improving our x87 codegen and leaving the door open for an SSE2
implementation, instead of putting all our eggs in the SSE2 basket.

Nov 15 '05 #13

P: n/a
did you mean:

for(x=0;x<nums.Length/4;x++)
{
sum+=nums[x];
}

for(x=nums.Length/4;x<nums.Length;x+=4)
{
sums0+=nums[x];
sums1+=nums[x+1];
sums2+=nums[x+2];
sums3+=nums[x+3];
}

sum = sums0 + sums1 + sums2 + sums03;

-Andre

Austin Ehlers wrote:
Hello,
Is there any work being done on using specific features of a processor
to increase performance? For example, on AMD Athlon XPs, there are 4
integer execution pipelines. I can get a 500% decrease in time if I
do a loop like this:

int sums0=0, sums1=0, sums2=0, sums3=0, sums=0;
for(x=0;x<nums.Length/4;x+=4)
{
sums0+=nums[x];
sums1+=nums[x+1];
sums2+=nums[x+2];
sums3+=nums[x+3];
}
sums=(sums0+sums1)+(sums2+sums3);

where nums[] is an array of integers. I know this would be hard to
implement in the JIT, but isn't one of the (main) ideas behind the JIT
is the ability to do run-time optimizations for whatever platform the
code is running on?

Thanks,
Austin Ehlers
On Wed, 6 Aug 2003 00:32:41 -0700, "David Notario"
<dn******@online.microsoft.com> wrote:

We've done more perf work in the JIT for out next version than for our
previous version, but we still won't be generating SSE2 or MMX code in our
codegen.

The rationale behind not doing SSE2 was that we didn't have the time to do a
vectorizing optimizations. If you use SSE2 for scalar operations, it's not
always faster than the equivalent x87 code in 'normal' code (adds and muls
have different latencies in SSE2 vs x87 (mul has lower latency in SSE2, but
add is higher, IIRC), plus some operations (casting from doubles to floats
or floats to doubles) are quite slow in SSE2 compared to x87. We also have
to support processors without SSE2.

So, with all these arguments against it, we decided to focus our work on
improving our x87 codegen and leaving the door open for an SSE2
implementation, instead of putting all our eggs in the SSE2 basket.



Nov 15 '05 #14

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