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Understanding socket.Send() with TCP and confirmation

Hi All,

I am trying to understand the blocking method socket.Send().
The call blocks as expected, but does this mean, it returnes after the
underlying TCP layer got a confirmation, that the send data was received by
the socket on the remote end? Can I count on that? Do I understand TCP
correctly in that, it gives confirmation [on the underlying level]? I do not
expect, that a .Net based receiver got that data when socket.Send()
terminates!

Hope I was clear,
thanks and best regards,
Manfred Braun

(Private)
Lange Roetterstrasse 7
D68167 Mannheim
Germany

mailto:_m****** *******@manfbra un.de
(Remove the anti-spam-underscore to mail me!)

Nov 17 '05 #1
13 8073
Send() will receive back to you when data will be written to system buffers
of kernel for sending , on receive you'll block untill incoming data will be
written into your buffer
HTH
Arkady

"Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
news:OV******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
Hi All,

I am trying to understand the blocking method socket.Send().
The call blocks as expected, but does this mean, it returnes after the
underlying TCP layer got a confirmation, that the send data was received
by
the socket on the remote end? Can I count on that? Do I understand TCP
correctly in that, it gives confirmation [on the underlying level]? I do
not
expect, that a .Net based receiver got that data when socket.Send()
terminates!

Hope I was clear,
thanks and best regards,
Manfred Braun

(Private)
Lange Roetterstrasse 7
D68167 Mannheim
Germany

mailto:_m****** *******@manfbra un.de
(Remove the anti-spam-underscore to mail me!)

Nov 17 '05 #2
P.S. So the number of bytes returned ( from Send() ) mean not number of
bytes really send or received on the other side , but number of bytes copied
to system buffer for send, so if that number less than you try to send you
need to resend the last part
Arkady
"Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
news:ex******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP14.phx.gbl. ..
Send() will receive back to you when data will be written to system
buffers of kernel for sending , on receive you'll block untill incoming
data will be written into your buffer
HTH
Arkady

"Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
news:OV******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
Hi All,

I am trying to understand the blocking method socket.Send().
The call blocks as expected, but does this mean, it returnes after the
underlying TCP layer got a confirmation, that the send data was received
by
the socket on the remote end? Can I count on that? Do I understand TCP
correctly in that, it gives confirmation [on the underlying level]? I do
not
expect, that a .Net based receiver got that data when socket.Send()
terminates!

Hope I was clear,
thanks and best regards,
Manfred Braun

(Private)
Lange Roetterstrasse 7
D68167 Mannheim
Germany

mailto:_m****** *******@manfbra un.de
(Remove the anti-spam-underscore to mail me!)


Nov 17 '05 #3
Hello,

and much thanks first!

Sad! I thought I can count on the delivery garantuee of TCP!! What, if an
error occurs in the underlying layer?? Should I send an explicit
confirmation through my receiver side?? I thought, this is only necessary
with UDP?!

Thanks so far and
best regards,
Manfred

"Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
news:u7******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
P.S. So the number of bytes returned ( from Send() ) mean not number of
bytes really send or received on the other side , but number of bytes copied to system buffer for send, so if that number less than you try to send you
need to resend the last part
Arkady
"Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
news:ex******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP14.phx.gbl. ..
Send() will receive back to you when data will be written to system
buffers of kernel for sending , on receive you'll block untill incoming
data will be written into your buffer
HTH
Arkady

"Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
news:OV******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
Hi All,

I am trying to understand the blocking method socket.Send().
The call blocks as expected, but does this mean, it returnes after the
underlying TCP layer got a confirmation, that the send data was received by
the socket on the remote end? Can I count on that? Do I understand TCP
correctly in that, it gives confirmation [on the underlying level]? I do not
expect, that a .Net based receiver got that data when socket.Send()
terminates!

Hope I was clear,
thanks and best regards,
Manfred Braun

(Private)
Lange Roetterstrasse 7
D68167 Mannheim
Germany

mailto:_m****** *******@manfbra un.de
(Remove the anti-spam-underscore to mail me!)



Nov 17 '05 #4
Confirmation you do receive, if you after send() you call recv(). You'll
receive error if remote host didn't send ack back to your TCP stack or data
if remote send you something
Arkady
P.S.Delivery raganteed in a sense that TCP stack try few times to resend
data. If no ack return back after all attempts the error code will be
returned

"Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
news:eH******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP14.phx.gbl...
Hello,

and much thanks first!

Sad! I thought I can count on the delivery garantuee of TCP!! What, if an
error occurs in the underlying layer?? Should I send an explicit
confirmation through my receiver side?? I thought, this is only necessary
with UDP?!

Thanks so far and
best regards,
Manfred

"Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
news:u7******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
P.S. So the number of bytes returned ( from Send() ) mean not number of
bytes really send or received on the other side , but number of bytes

copied
to system buffer for send, so if that number less than you try to send
you
need to resend the last part
Arkady
"Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
news:ex******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP14.phx.gbl. ..
> Send() will receive back to you when data will be written to system
> buffers of kernel for sending , on receive you'll block untill incoming
> data will be written into your buffer
> HTH
> Arkady
>
> "Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
> news:OV******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
>> Hi All,
>>
>> I am trying to understand the blocking method socket.Send().
>> The call blocks as expected, but does this mean, it returnes after the
>> underlying TCP layer got a confirmation, that the send data was received >> by
>> the socket on the remote end? Can I count on that? Do I understand TCP
>> correctly in that, it gives confirmation [on the underlying level]? I do >> not
>> expect, that a .Net based receiver got that data when socket.Send()
>> terminates!
>>
>> Hope I was clear,
>> thanks and best regards,
>> Manfred Braun
>>
>> (Private)
>> Lange Roetterstrasse 7
>> D68167 Mannheim
>> Germany
>>
>> mailto:_m****** *******@manfbra un.de
>> (Remove the anti-spam-underscore to mail me!)
>>
>>
>>
>
>



Nov 17 '05 #5
Hi,

thanks a lot! See "inline" [????]!!!

Best regards,
Manfred

"Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
news:Or******** *****@TK2MSFTNG P15.phx.gbl...
Confirmation you do receive, if you after send() you call recv(). You'll
receive error if remote host didn't send ack back to your TCP stack or data if remote send you something
Arkady
P.S.Delivery raganteed in a sense that TCP stack try few times to resend
data. If no ack return back after all attempts the error code will be
returned WHEN DOES THIS HAPPEN ??????????????? ???????????

"Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
news:eH******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP14.phx.gbl...
Hello,

and much thanks first!

Sad! I thought I can count on the delivery garantuee of TCP!! What, if an error occurs in the underlying layer?? Should I send an explicit
confirmation through my receiver side?? I thought, this is only necessary with UDP?!

Thanks so far and
best regards,
Manfred

"Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
news:u7******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
P.S. So the number of bytes returned ( from Send() ) mean not number of
bytes really send or received on the other side , but number of bytes

copied
to system buffer for send, so if that number less than you try to send
you
need to resend the last part
Arkady
"Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
news:ex******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP14.phx.gbl. ..
> Send() will receive back to you when data will be written to system
> buffers of kernel for sending , on receive you'll block untill incoming > data will be written into your buffer
> HTH
> Arkady
>
> "Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
> news:OV******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
>> Hi All,
>>
>> I am trying to understand the blocking method socket.Send().
>> The call blocks as expected, but does this mean, it returnes after the >> underlying TCP layer got a confirmation, that the send data was

received
>> by
>> the socket on the remote end? Can I count on that? Do I understand TCP >> correctly in that, it gives confirmation [on the underlying level]?
I do
>> not
>> expect, that a .Net based receiver got that data when socket.Send()
>> terminates!
>>
>> Hope I was clear,
>> thanks and best regards,
>> Manfred Braun
>>
>> (Private)
>> Lange Roetterstrasse 7
>> D68167 Mannheim
>> Germany
>>
>> mailto:_m****** *******@manfbra un.de
>> (Remove the anti-spam-underscore to mail me!)
>>
>>
>>
>
>



Nov 17 '05 #6
That depend upon OS you use because registry values depends upon that,
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=170359 describe the keys
Arkady

"Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
news:u2******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP09.phx.gbl...
Hi,

thanks a lot! See "inline" [????]!!!

Best regards,
Manfred

"Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
news:Or******** *****@TK2MSFTNG P15.phx.gbl...
Confirmation you do receive, if you after send() you call recv(). You'll
receive error if remote host didn't send ack back to your TCP stack or

data
if remote send you something
Arkady
P.S.Delivery raganteed in a sense that TCP stack try few times to resend
data. If no ack return back after all attempts the error code will be
returned WHEN DOES THIS HAPPEN ??????????????? ???????????

"Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
news:eH******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP14.phx.gbl...
> Hello,
>
> and much thanks first!
>
> Sad! I thought I can count on the delivery garantuee of TCP!! What, if an > error occurs in the underlying layer?? Should I send an explicit
> confirmation through my receiver side?? I thought, this is only necessary > with UDP?!
>
> Thanks so far and
> best regards,
> Manfred
>
> "Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
> news:u7******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
>> P.S. So the number of bytes returned ( from Send() ) mean not number
>> of
>> bytes really send or received on the other side , but number of bytes
> copied
>> to system buffer for send, so if that number less than you try to send
>> you
>> need to resend the last part
>> Arkady
>>
>>
>> "Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
>> news:ex******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP14.phx.gbl. ..
>> > Send() will receive back to you when data will be written to system
>> > buffers of kernel for sending , on receive you'll block untill incoming >> > data will be written into your buffer
>> > HTH
>> > Arkady
>> >
>> > "Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
>> > news:OV******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
>> >> Hi All,
>> >>
>> >> I am trying to understand the blocking method socket.Send().
>> >> The call blocks as expected, but does this mean, it returnes after the >> >> underlying TCP layer got a confirmation, that the send data was
> received
>> >> by
>> >> the socket on the remote end? Can I count on that? Do I understand TCP >> >> correctly in that, it gives confirmation [on the underlying level]? I > do
>> >> not
>> >> expect, that a .Net based receiver got that data when socket.Send()
>> >> terminates!
>> >>
>> >> Hope I was clear,
>> >> thanks and best regards,
>> >> Manfred Braun
>> >>
>> >> (Private)
>> >> Lange Roetterstrasse 7
>> >> D68167 Mannheim
>> >> Germany
>> >>
>> >> mailto:_m****** *******@manfbra un.de
>> >> (Remove the anti-spam-underscore to mail me!)
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>



Nov 17 '05 #7
Hi,

my summary:

If I send a single packet via TCP, I'll never get an error-message in
"socketSend ()", because the error may happen after the retransmission, which
needs some time and "socket.Sen d()" has returned already [which means the
packet was "scheduled" to the underlying TCP system]. To be absolutely sure,
to have the packet send successfully, my receiver must send an ack!

Am i correct in this?

And thanks a lot for your help!
Best regards,
Manfred

"Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
news:ue******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
That depend upon OS you use because registry values depends upon that,
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=170359 describe the keys
Arkady

"Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
news:u2******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP09.phx.gbl...
Hi,

thanks a lot! See "inline" [????]!!!

Best regards,
Manfred

"Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
news:Or******** *****@TK2MSFTNG P15.phx.gbl...
Confirmation you do receive, if you after send() you call recv(). You'll receive error if remote host didn't send ack back to your TCP stack or

data
if remote send you something
Arkady
P.S.Delivery raganteed in a sense that TCP stack try few times to resend data. If no ack return back after all attempts the error code will be
returned WHEN DOES THIS HAPPEN ??????????????? ???????????

"Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
news:eH******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP14.phx.gbl...
> Hello,
>
> and much thanks first!
>
> Sad! I thought I can count on the delivery garantuee of TCP!! What, if
an
> error occurs in the underlying layer?? Should I send an explicit
> confirmation through my receiver side?? I thought, this is only

necessary
> with UDP?!
>
> Thanks so far and
> best regards,
> Manfred
>
> "Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
> news:u7******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
>> P.S. So the number of bytes returned ( from Send() ) mean not number
>> of
>> bytes really send or received on the other side , but number of
bytes > copied
>> to system buffer for send, so if that number less than you try to send >> you
>> need to resend the last part
>> Arkady
>>
>>
>> "Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
>> news:ex******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP14.phx.gbl. ..
>> > Send() will receive back to you when data will be written to system >> > buffers of kernel for sending , on receive you'll block untill

incoming
>> > data will be written into your buffer
>> > HTH
>> > Arkady
>> >
>> > "Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
>> > news:OV******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
>> >> Hi All,
>> >>
>> >> I am trying to understand the blocking method socket.Send().
>> >> The call blocks as expected, but does this mean, it returnes after the
>> >> underlying TCP layer got a confirmation, that the send data was
> received
>> >> by
>> >> the socket on the remote end? Can I count on that? Do I
understand TCP
>> >> correctly in that, it gives confirmation [on the underlying
level]? I
> do
>> >> not
>> >> expect, that a .Net based receiver got that data when

socket.Send() >> >> terminates!
>> >>
>> >> Hope I was clear,
>> >> thanks and best regards,
>> >> Manfred Braun
>> >>
>> >> (Private)
>> >> Lange Roetterstrasse 7
>> >> D68167 Mannheim
>> >> Germany
>> >>
>> >> mailto:_m****** *******@manfbra un.de
>> >> (Remove the anti-spam-underscore to mail me!)
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>



Nov 17 '05 #8
Sorry , didn't saw you last question , but the answer is obviously - Yes.
OTOH you do can receive error still on sending side but that not because of
transmittion error but kernel problems ( like no place too set data and so
forth )
Arkady

"Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
news:eQ******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
Hi,

my summary:

If I send a single packet via TCP, I'll never get an error-message in
"socketSend ()", because the error may happen after the retransmission,
which
needs some time and "socket.Sen d()" has returned already [which means the
packet was "scheduled" to the underlying TCP system]. To be absolutely
sure,
to have the packet send successfully, my receiver must send an ack!

Am i correct in this?

And thanks a lot for your help!
Best regards,
Manfred

"Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
news:ue******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
That depend upon OS you use because registry values depends upon that,
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=170359 describe the keys
Arkady

"Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
news:u2******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP09.phx.gbl...
> Hi,
>
> thanks a lot! See "inline" [????]!!!
>
> Best regards,
> Manfred
>
> "Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
> news:Or******** *****@TK2MSFTNG P15.phx.gbl...
>> Confirmation you do receive, if you after send() you call recv(). You'll >> receive error if remote host didn't send ack back to your TCP stack or
> data
>> if remote send you something
>> Arkady
>> P.S.Delivery raganteed in a sense that TCP stack try few times to resend >> data. If no ack return back after all attempts the error code will be
>> returned WHEN DOES THIS HAPPEN ??????????????? ???????????
>>
>> "Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
>> news:eH******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP14.phx.gbl...
>> > Hello,
>> >
>> > and much thanks first!
>> >
>> > Sad! I thought I can count on the delivery garantuee of TCP!! What, if > an
>> > error occurs in the underlying layer?? Should I send an explicit
>> > confirmation through my receiver side?? I thought, this is only
> necessary
>> > with UDP?!
>> >
>> > Thanks so far and
>> > best regards,
>> > Manfred
>> >
>> > "Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
>> > news:u7******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
>> >> P.S. So the number of bytes returned ( from Send() ) mean not
>> >> number
>> >> of
>> >> bytes really send or received on the other side , but number of bytes >> > copied
>> >> to system buffer for send, so if that number less than you try to send >> >> you
>> >> need to resend the last part
>> >> Arkady
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> "Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
>> >> news:ex******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP14.phx.gbl. ..
>> >> > Send() will receive back to you when data will be written to system >> >> > buffers of kernel for sending , on receive you'll block untill
> incoming
>> >> > data will be written into your buffer
>> >> > HTH
>> >> > Arkady
>> >> >
>> >> > "Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
>> >> > news:OV******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
>> >> >> Hi All,
>> >> >>
>> >> >> I am trying to understand the blocking method socket.Send().
>> >> >> The call blocks as expected, but does this mean, it returnes after > the
>> >> >> underlying TCP layer got a confirmation, that the send data was
>> > received
>> >> >> by
>> >> >> the socket on the remote end? Can I count on that? Do I understand > TCP
>> >> >> correctly in that, it gives confirmation [on the underlying level]? > I
>> > do
>> >> >> not
>> >> >> expect, that a .Net based receiver got that data when socket.Send() >> >> >> terminates!
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Hope I was clear,
>> >> >> thanks and best regards,
>> >> >> Manfred Braun
>> >> >>
>> >> >> (Private)
>> >> >> Lange Roetterstrasse 7
>> >> >> D68167 Mannheim
>> >> >> Germany
>> >> >>
>> >> >> mailto:_m****** *******@manfbra un.de
>> >> >> (Remove the anti-spam-underscore to mail me!)
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>



Nov 17 '05 #9
Sorry , didn't saw you last question , but the answer is obviously - Yes.
OTOH you do can receive error still on sending side but that not because of
transmittion error but kernel problems ( like no place too set data and so
forth )
Arkady

"Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
news:eQ******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
Hi,

my summary:

If I send a single packet via TCP, I'll never get an error-message in
"socketSend ()", because the error may happen after the retransmission,
which
needs some time and "socket.Sen d()" has returned already [which means the
packet was "scheduled" to the underlying TCP system]. To be absolutely
sure,
to have the packet send successfully, my receiver must send an ack!

Am i correct in this?

And thanks a lot for your help!
Best regards,
Manfred

"Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
news:ue******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
That depend upon OS you use because registry values depends upon that,
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=170359 describe the keys
Arkady

"Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
news:u2******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP09.phx.gbl...
> Hi,
>
> thanks a lot! See "inline" [????]!!!
>
> Best regards,
> Manfred
>
> "Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
> news:Or******** *****@TK2MSFTNG P15.phx.gbl...
>> Confirmation you do receive, if you after send() you call recv(). You'll >> receive error if remote host didn't send ack back to your TCP stack or
> data
>> if remote send you something
>> Arkady
>> P.S.Delivery raganteed in a sense that TCP stack try few times to resend >> data. If no ack return back after all attempts the error code will be
>> returned WHEN DOES THIS HAPPEN ??????????????? ???????????
>>
>> "Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
>> news:eH******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP14.phx.gbl...
>> > Hello,
>> >
>> > and much thanks first!
>> >
>> > Sad! I thought I can count on the delivery garantuee of TCP!! What, if > an
>> > error occurs in the underlying layer?? Should I send an explicit
>> > confirmation through my receiver side?? I thought, this is only
> necessary
>> > with UDP?!
>> >
>> > Thanks so far and
>> > best regards,
>> > Manfred
>> >
>> > "Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
>> > news:u7******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
>> >> P.S. So the number of bytes returned ( from Send() ) mean not
>> >> number
>> >> of
>> >> bytes really send or received on the other side , but number of bytes >> > copied
>> >> to system buffer for send, so if that number less than you try to send >> >> you
>> >> need to resend the last part
>> >> Arkady
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> "Arkady Frenkel" <ar*****@hotmai lxdotx.com> wrote in message
>> >> news:ex******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP14.phx.gbl. ..
>> >> > Send() will receive back to you when data will be written to system >> >> > buffers of kernel for sending , on receive you'll block untill
> incoming
>> >> > data will be written into your buffer
>> >> > HTH
>> >> > Arkady
>> >> >
>> >> > "Manfred Braun" <aa@bb.cc> wrote in message
>> >> > news:OV******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
>> >> >> Hi All,
>> >> >>
>> >> >> I am trying to understand the blocking method socket.Send().
>> >> >> The call blocks as expected, but does this mean, it returnes after > the
>> >> >> underlying TCP layer got a confirmation, that the send data was
>> > received
>> >> >> by
>> >> >> the socket on the remote end? Can I count on that? Do I understand > TCP
>> >> >> correctly in that, it gives confirmation [on the underlying level]? > I
>> > do
>> >> >> not
>> >> >> expect, that a .Net based receiver got that data when socket.Send() >> >> >> terminates!
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Hope I was clear,
>> >> >> thanks and best regards,
>> >> >> Manfred Braun
>> >> >>
>> >> >> (Private)
>> >> >> Lange Roetterstrasse 7
>> >> >> D68167 Mannheim
>> >> >> Germany
>> >> >>
>> >> >> mailto:_m****** *******@manfbra un.de
>> >> >> (Remove the anti-spam-underscore to mail me!)
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>



Nov 17 '05 #10

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2534
by: Anders Both | last post by:
If you send data using TCP and Socket, can the client then be 100% sure that if it send´s data and no exception uccur, then the data will also arrived in a a correct way on the server. What if e.g. some router on the way has restarted or if it restarts just in the same time as the data is beeing send. ?
1
1757
by: jm | last post by:
Easy probably, please read on. I know some of you have commented already about some of my socket question. I appreciate that. I have a Form1: static void Main() { Application.Run(new Form1()); clsListening.AsynchronousSocketListener.StartListening();
4
18102
by: Chris Tanger | last post by:
Context: C# System.Net.Sockets Socket created with constructor prarmeters Internetwork, Stream and TCP everything else is left at the default parameters and options except linger may be changed as I find appropriate. I am using the socket asynchronously by calling the BeingSend and BeginReceive calls. I would like to be able to call shutdown and close asynchronously if possible.
2
1491
by: Crirus | last post by:
Hello I just wrote a TCP server. For that I used MSDN sample. So, I have a asyncron server. As they say in MSDN, I have this methods: ---------------------- Private Sub StartListening() that is the entry point of the server main thread. Private Sub AcceptCallback(ByVal ar As IAsyncResult)
2
4146
by: Nuno Magalhaes | last post by:
I've got a simple problem I guess. How do I know when a connection is terminated without losing any data? I do something like the code below, but sometimes between socket.Receive and socket.Send I get the last chunk of data and am not able to retrieve it anymore cause the socket will be dead. Loop: { socket.Receive <----------- data arrives
6
2030
by: Abubakar | last post by:
Hi, lets say I have a connected SOCKET s. At some point in time, I want to know if the "s" is still valid, that it is still connected. Is there any API that I can give me this information? And can I register some callback like thing, that would inform me when "s" disconnection happens? What I usually do is while I call "send" or "recv", I get the socket_error and through that I know whats the status. But in this situation actually I...
11
7700
by: hazz | last post by:
smtpClient.Send(message) is causing me problems as per specifics in the trace below. Email is sent but not without this error typically upon sending the second email, but sometimes when running the app, even the first time. The application will be required to be sending out repeated emails, about one every second or two. Must this be done asynchronously? Thank you. -Greg I get the generic error messages;
3
4281
by: BuddyWork | last post by:
Hello, Could someone please explain why the Socket.Send is slow to send to the same process it sending from. Eg. Process1 calls Socket.Send which sends to the same IP address and port, the receiver is running within Process1. If I move the receiver into Process2 then its fast. Please can someone explain.
14
12747
by: ahlongxp | last post by:
Hi, everyone, I'm implementing a simple client/server protocol. Now I've got a situation: client will send server command,header paires and optionally body. server checks headers and decides whether to accept(read) the body. if server decided to throw(dump) the request's body, it'll send back a response message, such as "resource already exists" and close the connection.
0
7970
marktang
by: marktang | last post by:
ONU (Optical Network Unit) is one of the key components for providing high-speed Internet services. Its primary function is to act as an endpoint device located at the user's premises. However, people are often confused as to whether an ONU can Work As a Router. In this blog post, we’ll explore What is ONU, What Is Router, ONU & Router’s main usage, and What is the difference between ONU and Router. Let’s take a closer look ! Part I. Meaning of...
0
8274
Oralloy
by: Oralloy | last post by:
Hello folks, I am unable to find appropriate documentation on the type promotion of bit-fields when using the generalised comparison operator "<=>". The problem is that using the GNU compilers, it seems that the internal comparison operator "<=>" tries to promote arguments from unsigned to signed. This is as boiled down as I can make it. Here is my compilation command: g++-12 -std=c++20 -Wnarrowing bit_field.cpp Here is the code in...
1
8036
by: Hystou | last post by:
Overview: Windows 11 and 10 have less user interface control over operating system update behaviour than previous versions of Windows. In Windows 11 and 10, there is no way to turn off the Windows Update option using the Control Panel or Settings app; it automatically checks for updates and installs any it finds, whether you like it or not. For most users, this new feature is actually very convenient. If you want to control the update process,...
0
8259
tracyyun
by: tracyyun | last post by:
Dear forum friends, With the development of smart home technology, a variety of wireless communication protocols have appeared on the market, such as Zigbee, Z-Wave, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, etc. Each protocol has its own unique characteristics and advantages, but as a user who is planning to build a smart home system, I am a bit confused by the choice of these technologies. I'm particularly interested in Zigbee because I've heard it does some...
0
6695
agi2029
by: agi2029 | last post by:
Let's talk about the concept of autonomous AI software engineers and no-code agents. These AIs are designed to manage the entire lifecycle of a software development project—planning, coding, testing, and deployment—without human intervention. Imagine an AI that can take a project description, break it down, write the code, debug it, and then launch it, all on its own.... Now, this would greatly impact the work of software developers. The idea...
0
3886
by: TSSRALBI | last post by:
Hello I'm a network technician in training and I need your help. I am currently learning how to create and manage the different types of VPNs and I have a question about LAN-to-LAN VPNs. The last exercise I practiced was to create a LAN-to-LAN VPN between two Pfsense firewalls, by using IPSEC protocols. I succeeded, with both firewalls in the same network. But I'm wondering if it's possible to do the same thing, with 2 Pfsense firewalls...
0
3930
by: adsilva | last post by:
A Windows Forms form does not have the event Unload, like VB6. What one acts like?
1
2404
by: 6302768590 | last post by:
Hai team i want code for transfer the data from one system to another through IP address by using C# our system has to for every 5mins then we have to update the data what the data is updated we have to send another system
0
1241
bsmnconsultancy
by: bsmnconsultancy | last post by:
In today's digital era, a well-designed website is crucial for businesses looking to succeed. Whether you're a small business owner or a large corporation in Toronto, having a strong online presence can significantly impact your brand's success. BSMN Consultancy, a leader in Website Development in Toronto offers valuable insights into creating effective websites that not only look great but also perform exceptionally well. In this comprehensive...

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