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Referencing assemblies and .config files.

Hi guys, just going through remoting at the moment and a couple of questions
relating to .net in general has surfaced.
Firstly I have seen in the designer that for the namespace and many of its
associated classes of System.Runtime. Remoting are available, but certain
ones are not. A reference to System.Runtime. Remoting needs to be added to
make available all the unavailable ones. Now although I (think) understand
the concept that an assembly needs to be referenced in order for its classes
and other members to be exposed to the designer, I cant quite get my head
around why some classes of certain namespaces are available and others
arent -until a reference is made to this assembly. Is this simply a design
issue that certain parts of a namespace have been exposed in certain
assemblies. Could someone explain how this works and why it has been done?

The second part of my question relates to XML elements and attributes of
config files. Having looked at an example of storing certain predefined
elements for remoting config it has occurred to me that there must be some
kind of reference for this XML based language to configure things at
runtime. For instance I might have known how to register a client activated
channel in c# code, but how would I have known that...
{snippet!!}
<channels>
<channel ref="http" port="1234" />
</channels>
...would have done the same thing. Therefore there must be somewhere that I
can look these things up?

thanks in advance!
--
Br,
Mark Broadbent
mcdba , mcse+i
=============
Nov 16 '05 #1
12 1968
1)
A namespace can be distributed over several assemblies. A namespace doesn't really exist in an assembly - each type in the assembly just happen to have a fully qualified name that consists of several parts. Therefore, it's possible that you see some System.Runtime. Remoting types in one assembly and others in another assembly.

However, I would expect all System.Runtime. Remoting.* types to be located in System.Runtime. Remoting.dll assembly, i.e., I don't understand how you can see some of the types without a reference to System.Runtime. Remoting.dll. Try to run ildasm.exe on the assemblies that you do have references to - and see what types they contain.

2)
I don't know where the reference is. But in addition to the "standard" stuff, it's possible to add your own configuration information in that file and then read it at runtime.

Christian

---

"Mark Broadbent" wrote:
Hi guys, just going through remoting at the moment and a couple of questions
relating to .net in general has surfaced.
Firstly I have seen in the designer that for the namespace and many of its
associated classes of System.Runtime. Remoting are available, but certain
ones are not. A reference to System.Runtime. Remoting needs to be added to
make available all the unavailable ones. Now although I (think) understand
the concept that an assembly needs to be referenced in order for its classes
and other members to be exposed to the designer, I cant quite get my head
around why some classes of certain namespaces are available and others
arent -until a reference is made to this assembly. Is this simply a design
issue that certain parts of a namespace have been exposed in certain
assemblies. Could someone explain how this works and why it has been done?

The second part of my question relates to XML elements and attributes of
config files. Having looked at an example of storing certain predefined
elements for remoting config it has occurred to me that there must be some
kind of reference for this XML based language to configure things at
runtime. For instance I might have known how to register a client activated
channel in c# code, but how would I have known that...
{snippet!!}
<channels>
<channel ref="http" port="1234" />
</channels>
...would have done the same thing. Therefore there must be somewhere that I
can look these things up?

thanks in advance!
--
Br,
Mark Broadbent
mcdba , mcse+i
=============

Nov 16 '05 #2
1. I think the trade-off of having some namespaces in separate assemblies is
really down to the size of the assembly and the likelihood that it will be
referenced. Loading an assembly takes time, so they want to reduce the size
of the default assemblies as much as possible. Namespaces like Remoting and
Windows.Forms are great candidates for splitting off into separate
assemblies because they are large namespaces and used only in specific
circumstances.

2. The remoting configuration file format is all documented in MSDN.
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...asp?frame=true

--
John Wood
EMail: first name, dot, last name, at priorganize.com
"Mark Broadbent" <no************ @no-spam-please.com> wrote in message
news:Ov******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP09.phx.gbl...
Hi guys, just going through remoting at the moment and a couple of questions relating to .net in general has surfaced.
Firstly I have seen in the designer that for the namespace and many of its
associated classes of System.Runtime. Remoting are available, but certain
ones are not. A reference to System.Runtime. Remoting needs to be added to
make available all the unavailable ones. Now although I (think) understand
the concept that an assembly needs to be referenced in order for its classes and other members to be exposed to the designer, I cant quite get my head
around why some classes of certain namespaces are available and others
arent -until a reference is made to this assembly. Is this simply a design
issue that certain parts of a namespace have been exposed in certain
assemblies. Could someone explain how this works and why it has been done?

The second part of my question relates to XML elements and attributes of
config files. Having looked at an example of storing certain predefined
elements for remoting config it has occurred to me that there must be some
kind of reference for this XML based language to configure things at
runtime. For instance I might have known how to register a client activated channel in c# code, but how would I have known that...
{snippet!!}
<channels>
<channel ref="http" port="1234" />
</channels>
..would have done the same thing. Therefore there must be somewhere that I
can look these things up?

thanks in advance!
--
Br,
Mark Broadbent
mcdba , mcse+i
=============

Nov 16 '05 #3
1. makes sense, thought that might be reason. Question is where am I picking
up the initial remoting classes from? -At a guess I'd say there is a
System.Runtime. Remoting namespace defined in mscorlib.dll (which I think Im
right in saying is referenced automatically). Certainly if I look at it thru
object browser it certainly seems that way.

2. Thx for this link. I was kind of hoping the documentation for all
namespaces/ classes config in Xml docs would be in one place but I guess
I'll have to see what I can find on a class by class basis. Still thx for
this starting point.

--
Br,
Mark Broadbent
mcdba , mcse+i
=============
"John Wood" <j@ro.com> wrote in message
news:uS******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
1. I think the trade-off of having some namespaces in separate assemblies is really down to the size of the assembly and the likelihood that it will be
referenced. Loading an assembly takes time, so they want to reduce the size of the default assemblies as much as possible. Namespaces like Remoting and Windows.Forms are great candidates for splitting off into separate
assemblies because they are large namespaces and used only in specific
circumstances.

2. The remoting configuration file format is all documented in MSDN.
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...asp?frame=true
--
John Wood
EMail: first name, dot, last name, at priorganize.com
"Mark Broadbent" <no************ @no-spam-please.com> wrote in message
news:Ov******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP09.phx.gbl...
Hi guys, just going through remoting at the moment and a couple of

questions
relating to .net in general has surfaced.
Firstly I have seen in the designer that for the namespace and many of its associated classes of System.Runtime. Remoting are available, but certain
ones are not. A reference to System.Runtime. Remoting needs to be added to make available all the unavailable ones. Now although I (think) understand the concept that an assembly needs to be referenced in order for its

classes
and other members to be exposed to the designer, I cant quite get my head around why some classes of certain namespaces are available and others
arent -until a reference is made to this assembly. Is this simply a design issue that certain parts of a namespace have been exposed in certain
assemblies. Could someone explain how this works and why it has been done?
The second part of my question relates to XML elements and attributes of
config files. Having looked at an example of storing certain predefined
elements for remoting config it has occurred to me that there must be some kind of reference for this XML based language to configure things at
runtime. For instance I might have known how to register a client

activated
channel in c# code, but how would I have known that...
{snippet!!}
<channels>
<channel ref="http" port="1234" />
</channels>
..would have done the same thing. Therefore there must be somewhere that I can look these things up?

thanks in advance!
--
Br,
Mark Broadbent
mcdba , mcse+i
=============


Nov 16 '05 #4
1. thx. You'll see though that if you create a project and remove all
references, you can still access part of the System.Runtime. Remoting
namespace in code (try intellisense to see that it does) -I think these
types are in the mscorlib.dll.
--
Br,
Mark Broadbent
mcdba , mcse+i
=============
"Christian Heide Damm" <Ch************ ****@discussion s.microsoft.com > wrote
in message news:E9******** *************** ***********@mic rosoft.com...
1)
A namespace can be distributed over several assemblies. A namespace doesn't really exist in an assembly - each type in the assembly just happen
to have a fully qualified name that consists of several parts. Therefore,
it's possible that you see some System.Runtime. Remoting types in one
assembly and others in another assembly.
However, I would expect all System.Runtime. Remoting.* types to be located in System.Runtime. Remoting.dll assembly, i.e., I don't understand how you
can see some of the types without a reference to
System.Runtime. Remoting.dll. Try to run ildasm.exe on the assemblies that
you do have references to - and see what types they contain.
2)
I don't know where the reference is. But in addition to the "standard" stuff, it's possible to add your own configuration information in that file
and then read it at runtime.
Christian

---

"Mark Broadbent" wrote:
Hi guys, just going through remoting at the moment and a couple of questions relating to .net in general has surfaced.
Firstly I have seen in the designer that for the namespace and many of its associated classes of System.Runtime. Remoting are available, but certain
ones are not. A reference to System.Runtime. Remoting needs to be added to make available all the unavailable ones. Now although I (think) understand the concept that an assembly needs to be referenced in order for its classes and other members to be exposed to the designer, I cant quite get my head around why some classes of certain namespaces are available and others
arent -until a reference is made to this assembly. Is this simply a design issue that certain parts of a namespace have been exposed in certain
assemblies. Could someone explain how this works and why it has been done?
The second part of my question relates to XML elements and attributes of
config files. Having looked at an example of storing certain predefined
elements for remoting config it has occurred to me that there must be some kind of reference for this XML based language to configure things at
runtime. For instance I might have known how to register a client activated channel in c# code, but how would I have known that...
{snippet!!}
<channels>
<channel ref="http" port="1234" />
</channels>
...would have done the same thing. Therefore there must be somewhere that I can look these things up?

thanks in advance!
--
Br,
Mark Broadbent
mcdba , mcse+i
=============

Nov 16 '05 #5
I think you'll find the remoting namespaces are held in a separate DLL
called System.Runtime. Remoting.dll.

--
John Wood
EMail: first name, dot, last name, at priorganize.com
"Mark Broadbent" <no************ @no-spam-please.com> wrote in message
news:%2******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP09.phx.gbl. ..
1. makes sense, thought that might be reason. Question is where am I picking up the initial remoting classes from? -At a guess I'd say there is a
System.Runtime. Remoting namespace defined in mscorlib.dll (which I think Im right in saying is referenced automatically). Certainly if I look at it thru object browser it certainly seems that way.

2. Thx for this link. I was kind of hoping the documentation for all
namespaces/ classes config in Xml docs would be in one place but I guess
I'll have to see what I can find on a class by class basis. Still thx for
this starting point.

--
Br,
Mark Broadbent
mcdba , mcse+i
=============
"John Wood" <j@ro.com> wrote in message
news:uS******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
1. I think the trade-off of having some namespaces in separate assemblies
is
really down to the size of the assembly and the likelihood that it will be referenced. Loading an assembly takes time, so they want to reduce the size
of the default assemblies as much as possible. Namespaces like Remoting

and
Windows.Forms are great candidates for splitting off into separate
assemblies because they are large namespaces and used only in specific
circumstances.

2. The remoting configuration file format is all documented in MSDN.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...asp?frame=true

--
John Wood
EMail: first name, dot, last name, at priorganize.com
"Mark Broadbent" <no************ @no-spam-please.com> wrote in message
news:Ov******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP09.phx.gbl...
Hi guys, just going through remoting at the moment and a couple of

questions
relating to .net in general has surfaced.
Firstly I have seen in the designer that for the namespace and many of

its associated classes of System.Runtime. Remoting are available, but certain ones are not. A reference to System.Runtime. Remoting needs to be added to make available all the unavailable ones. Now although I (think) understand the concept that an assembly needs to be referenced in order for its

classes
and other members to be exposed to the designer, I cant quite get my head around why some classes of certain namespaces are available and others
arent -until a reference is made to this assembly. Is this simply a design issue that certain parts of a namespace have been exposed in certain
assemblies. Could someone explain how this works and why it has been done?
The second part of my question relates to XML elements and attributes of config files. Having looked at an example of storing certain predefined elements for remoting config it has occurred to me that there must be some kind of reference for this XML based language to configure things at
runtime. For instance I might have known how to register a client

activated
channel in c# code, but how would I have known that...
{snippet!!}
<channels>
<channel ref="http" port="1234" />
</channels>
..would have done the same thing. Therefore there must be somewhere
that I can look these things up?

thanks in advance!
--
Br,
Mark Broadbent
mcdba , mcse+i
=============



Nov 16 '05 #6
There is some file that defines the _default switches_ for csc.exe. MsCorLib is certainly referenced by default.

If you try to run "csc.exe /nostdlib ....", then you'll probably get lots of compile errors since you're missing the basic stuff (e.g., Console.WriteLi ne).

Christian

---

"Mark Broadbent" wrote:
1. thx. You'll see though that if you create a project and remove all
references, you can still access part of the System.Runtime. Remoting
namespace in code (try intellisense to see that it does) -I think these
types are in the mscorlib.dll.
--
Br,
Mark Broadbent
mcdba , mcse+i
=============
"Christian Heide Damm" <Ch************ ****@discussion s.microsoft.com > wrote
in message news:E9******** *************** ***********@mic rosoft.com...
1)
A namespace can be distributed over several assemblies. A namespace

doesn't really exist in an assembly - each type in the assembly just happen
to have a fully qualified name that consists of several parts. Therefore,
it's possible that you see some System.Runtime. Remoting types in one
assembly and others in another assembly.

However, I would expect all System.Runtime. Remoting.* types to be located

in System.Runtime. Remoting.dll assembly, i.e., I don't understand how you
can see some of the types without a reference to
System.Runtime. Remoting.dll. Try to run ildasm.exe on the assemblies that
you do have references to - and see what types they contain.

2)
I don't know where the reference is. But in addition to the "standard"

stuff, it's possible to add your own configuration information in that file
and then read it at runtime.

Christian

---

"Mark Broadbent" wrote:
Hi guys, just going through remoting at the moment and a couple of questions relating to .net in general has surfaced.
Firstly I have seen in the designer that for the namespace and many of its associated classes of System.Runtime. Remoting are available, but certain
ones are not. A reference to System.Runtime. Remoting needs to be added to make available all the unavailable ones. Now although I (think) understand the concept that an assembly needs to be referenced in order for its classes and other members to be exposed to the designer, I cant quite get my head around why some classes of certain namespaces are available and others
arent -until a reference is made to this assembly. Is this simply a design issue that certain parts of a namespace have been exposed in certain
assemblies. Could someone explain how this works and why it has been done?
The second part of my question relates to XML elements and attributes of
config files. Having looked at an example of storing certain predefined
elements for remoting config it has occurred to me that there must be some kind of reference for this XML based language to configure things at
runtime. For instance I might have known how to register a client activated channel in c# code, but how would I have known that...
{snippet!!}
<channels>
<channel ref="http" port="1234" />
</channels>
...would have done the same thing. Therefore there must be somewhere that I can look these things up?

thanks in advance!
--
Br,
Mark Broadbent
mcdba , mcse+i
=============


Nov 16 '05 #7
That was partly my point that you will notice that you can declaratively
access part of the System.Runtime. Remoting namespace *without* adding a
reference to the remoting.dll. However some classes of the namespace was
missing which I could only make available by referencing this dll. This
really is the basis for my question because (like your assumption) you would
have thought that everything that belongs to remoting would be accessible
through the remoting.dll; wheras you will find that alot is accessible
without referencing this. Hence I believe that this namespace spans several
dlls ... and the bit that is being exposed to me I think can be found in the
mscorlib.dll.
Please have a try with intellisense (or view mscorlib via object browser)
and you will see what I mean.
I can only assume that things have been designed like this to reduce file
library sizes, and to only expose essential classes in namespaces for design
reasons.

P.S. I am pretty sure that remoting is not the only namespace that spans
dlls like this.

I hope I made more sense.
--
Br,
Mark Broadbent
mcdba , mcse+i
=============
"John Wood" <j@ro.com> wrote in message
news:%2******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP12.phx.gbl. ..
I think you'll find the remoting namespaces are held in a separate DLL
called System.Runtime. Remoting.dll.

--
John Wood
EMail: first name, dot, last name, at priorganize.com
"Mark Broadbent" <no************ @no-spam-please.com> wrote in message
news:%2******** ********@TK2MSF TNGP09.phx.gbl. ..
1. makes sense, thought that might be reason. Question is where am I picking
up the initial remoting classes from? -At a guess I'd say there is a
System.Runtime. Remoting namespace defined in mscorlib.dll (which I think

Im
right in saying is referenced automatically). Certainly if I look at it

thru
object browser it certainly seems that way.

2. Thx for this link. I was kind of hoping the documentation for all
namespaces/ classes config in Xml docs would be in one place but I guess
I'll have to see what I can find on a class by class basis. Still thx for
this starting point.

--
Br,
Mark Broadbent
mcdba , mcse+i
=============
"John Wood" <j@ro.com> wrote in message
news:uS******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
1. I think the trade-off of having some namespaces in separate assemblies
is
really down to the size of the assembly and the likelihood that it will be referenced. Loading an assembly takes time, so they want to reduce the size
of the default assemblies as much as possible. Namespaces like
Remoting and
Windows.Forms are great candidates for splitting off into separate
assemblies because they are large namespaces and used only in specific
circumstances.

2. The remoting configuration file format is all documented in MSDN.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...asp?frame=true
--
John Wood
EMail: first name, dot, last name, at priorganize.com
"Mark Broadbent" <no************ @no-spam-please.com> wrote in message
news:Ov******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP09.phx.gbl...
> Hi guys, just going through remoting at the moment and a couple of
questions
> relating to .net in general has surfaced.
> Firstly I have seen in the designer that for the namespace and many of
its
> associated classes of System.Runtime. Remoting are available, but certain > ones are not. A reference to System.Runtime. Remoting needs to be
added to
> make available all the unavailable ones. Now although I (think)

understand
> the concept that an assembly needs to be referenced in order for its
classes
> and other members to be exposed to the designer, I cant quite get my

head
> around why some classes of certain namespaces are available and
others > arent -until a reference is made to this assembly. Is this simply a

design
> issue that certain parts of a namespace have been exposed in certain
> assemblies. Could someone explain how this works and why it has been

done?
>
> The second part of my question relates to XML elements and

attributes of > config files. Having looked at an example of storing certain predefined > elements for remoting config it has occurred to me that there must

be some
> kind of reference for this XML based language to configure things at
> runtime. For instance I might have known how to register a client
activated
> channel in c# code, but how would I have known that...
> {snippet!!}
> <channels>
> <channel ref="http" port="1234" />
> </channels>
> ..would have done the same thing. Therefore there must be somewhere

that
I
> can look these things up?
>
> thanks in advance!
> --
>
>
> Br,
> Mark Broadbent
> mcdba , mcse+i
> =============
>
>



Nov 16 '05 #8
will try that sometime when Im not so busy. Thanks fo that tip -will be
interesting to see the results.

--
Br,
Mark Broadbent
mcdba , mcse+i
=============
"Christian Heide Damm" <Ch************ ****@discussion s.microsoft.com > wrote
in message news:F5******** *************** ***********@mic rosoft.com...
There is some file that defines the _default switches_ for csc.exe. MsCorLib is certainly referenced by default.
If you try to run "csc.exe /nostdlib ....", then you'll probably get lots of compile errors since you're missing the basic stuff (e.g.,
Console.WriteLi ne).
Christian

---

"Mark Broadbent" wrote:
1. thx. You'll see though that if you create a project and remove all
references, you can still access part of the System.Runtime. Remoting
namespace in code (try intellisense to see that it does) -I think these
types are in the mscorlib.dll.
--
Br,
Mark Broadbent
mcdba , mcse+i
=============
"Christian Heide Damm" <Ch************ ****@discussion s.microsoft.com > wrote in message news:E9******** *************** ***********@mic rosoft.com...
1)
A namespace can be distributed over several assemblies. A namespace

doesn't really exist in an assembly - each type in the assembly just happen to have a fully qualified name that consists of several parts. Therefore, it's possible that you see some System.Runtime. Remoting types in one
assembly and others in another assembly.

However, I would expect all System.Runtime. Remoting.* types to be located
in System.Runtime. Remoting.dll assembly, i.e., I don't understand how you can see some of the types without a reference to
System.Runtime. Remoting.dll. Try to run ildasm.exe on the assemblies that you do have references to - and see what types they contain.

2)
I don't know where the reference is. But in addition to the "standard"

stuff, it's possible to add your own configuration information in that file and then read it at runtime.

Christian

---

"Mark Broadbent" wrote:

> Hi guys, just going through remoting at the moment and a couple of

questions
> relating to .net in general has surfaced.
> Firstly I have seen in the designer that for the namespace and many
of its
> associated classes of System.Runtime. Remoting are available, but
certain > ones are not. A reference to System.Runtime. Remoting needs to be added to
> make available all the unavailable ones. Now although I (think)

understand
> the concept that an assembly needs to be referenced in order for its

classes
> and other members to be exposed to the designer, I cant quite get my

head
> around why some classes of certain namespaces are available and
others > arent -until a reference is made to this assembly. Is this simply a

design
> issue that certain parts of a namespace have been exposed in certain
> assemblies. Could someone explain how this works and why it has been

done?
>
> The second part of my question relates to XML elements and attributes of > config files. Having looked at an example of storing certain predefined > elements for remoting config it has occurred to me that there must

be some
> kind of reference for this XML based language to configure things at
> runtime. For instance I might have known how to register a client

activated
> channel in c# code, but how would I have known that...
> {snippet!!}
> <channels>
> <channel ref="http" port="1234" />
> </channels>
> ...would have done the same thing. Therefore there must be somewhere

that I
> can look these things up?
>
> thanks in advance!
> --
>
>
> Br,
> Mark Broadbent
> mcdba , mcse+i
> =============
>
>
>


Nov 16 '05 #9
Hi,

I believe that the classes, defined in mscorlib.dll are those parts of
the remoting, which make use of the cross appdomain buildin memory
channels, used behind the scenes, when you just pass a reference of an
object between 2 appdomains in your process, or those one, used for com
interop.

The other classes, which are responsible for creating channels and all
other remoting stuff are located at their own assembly.

Sunny
In article <#9************ **@TK2MSFTNGP09 .phx.gbl>, no-spam-please@no-
spam-please.com says...
1. thx. You'll see though that if you create a project and remove all
references, you can still access part of the System.Runtime. Remoting
namespace in code (try intellisense to see that it does) -I think these
types are in the mscorlib.dll.

Nov 16 '05 #10

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5121
by: Smithers | last post by:
I have a Windows Forms application that implements a plug-in architecture whereby required assemblies are identified and loaded dynamically. Here are the relevant classes: A = application = Windows Forms class B = a singleton hosted within A. B is responsible for dynamically loading classes X, Y, and Z.
1
2138
by: Dave Anson | last post by:
What is the recommended practice for referencing assemblies in a project from other solutions? I am using Visual Studio 2005 Team System. I have several assemblies in another solution which will be referenced in my project. How should i reference them. e.g. 1) Should I get both solutions from source safe then point to the assembly
1
2848
by: Tom | last post by:
My unsigned DLL works in my project that references it as long as I set Copy Local = true. Now I have signed the DLL with the sn.exe generated keys but have not yet moved the DLL into the GAC. Can I use a strong named DLL outside the GAC with Copy Local = false by providing a reference to the public key? If yes to above, please tell me how to reference the public key within
0
9901
marktang
by: marktang | last post by:
ONU (Optical Network Unit) is one of the key components for providing high-speed Internet services. Its primary function is to act as an endpoint device located at the user's premises. However, people are often confused as to whether an ONU can Work As a Router. In this blog post, we’ll explore What is ONU, What Is Router, ONU & Router’s main usage, and What is the difference between ONU and Router. Let’s take a closer look ! Part I. Meaning of...
0
11025
Oralloy
by: Oralloy | last post by:
Hello folks, I am unable to find appropriate documentation on the type promotion of bit-fields when using the generalised comparison operator "<=>". The problem is that using the GNU compilers, it seems that the internal comparison operator "<=>" tries to promote arguments from unsigned to signed. This is as boiled down as I can make it. Here is my compilation command: g++-12 -std=c++20 -Wnarrowing bit_field.cpp Here is the code in...
0
10682
jinu1996
by: jinu1996 | last post by:
In today's digital age, having a compelling online presence is paramount for businesses aiming to thrive in a competitive landscape. At the heart of this digital strategy lies an intricately woven tapestry of website design and digital marketing. It's not merely about having a website; it's about crafting an immersive digital experience that captivates audiences and drives business growth. The Art of Business Website Design Your website is...
0
10371
tracyyun
by: tracyyun | last post by:
Dear forum friends, With the development of smart home technology, a variety of wireless communication protocols have appeared on the market, such as Zigbee, Z-Wave, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, etc. Each protocol has its own unique characteristics and advantages, but as a user who is planning to build a smart home system, I am a bit confused by the choice of these technologies. I'm particularly interested in Zigbee because I've heard it does some...
0
9513
agi2029
by: agi2029 | last post by:
Let's talk about the concept of autonomous AI software engineers and no-code agents. These AIs are designed to manage the entire lifecycle of a software development project—planning, coding, testing, and deployment—without human intervention. Imagine an AI that can take a project description, break it down, write the code, debug it, and then launch it, all on its own.... Now, this would greatly impact the work of software developers. The idea...
1
7915
isladogs
by: isladogs | last post by:
The next Access Europe User Group meeting will be on Wednesday 1 May 2024 starting at 18:00 UK time (6PM UTC+1) and finishing by 19:30 (7.30PM). In this session, we are pleased to welcome a new presenter, Adolph Dupré who will be discussing some powerful techniques for using class modules. He will explain when you may want to use classes instead of User Defined Types (UDT). For example, to manage the data in unbound forms. Adolph will...
0
5743
by: TSSRALBI | last post by:
Hello I'm a network technician in training and I need your help. I am currently learning how to create and manage the different types of VPNs and I have a question about LAN-to-LAN VPNs. The last exercise I practiced was to create a LAN-to-LAN VPN between two Pfsense firewalls, by using IPSEC protocols. I succeeded, with both firewalls in the same network. But I'm wondering if it's possible to do the same thing, with 2 Pfsense firewalls...
0
5942
by: adsilva | last post by:
A Windows Forms form does not have the event Unload, like VB6. What one acts like?
1
4562
by: 6302768590 | last post by:
Hai team i want code for transfer the data from one system to another through IP address by using C# our system has to for every 5mins then we have to update the data what the data is updated we have to send another system

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