473,890 Members | 1,369 Online
Bytes | Software Development & Data Engineering Community
+ Post

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

Limitations/disadvantages of C#

My company is considering using C# for a large project and it is a
language I'm only just now becoming familiar with. For the most part
I like it and that seems to be the most logical choice as far as
future support. My question is: what are the disadvantages or
limitations of using C#? So far I've seen very few people willing to
mention anything "bad" about it, but every language has it's faults.
We would be using C# in the .NET Framework and building with Visual
Studio .NET (I assume there are other compilers though I haven't
looked). My biggest concern is something I read once, that the C#
compiler in VS will not produce object files for later linking so any
changes require the entire project to be recompiled. Is this true?
Are there any other things that may be a consideration for a
large-scale project (several hundred thousand lines of code at a
minimum)?
Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
----------------------------------------------------------
** SPEED ** RETENTION ** COMPLETION ** ANONYMITY **
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.usenet.com
Nov 15 '05 #1
8 23182
Wilbur <fo*****@yaho o-dot-com.no-spam.invalid> wrote:
My company is considering using C# for a large project and it is a
language I'm only just now becoming familiar with. For the most part
I like it and that seems to be the most logical choice as far as
future support. My question is: what are the disadvantages or
limitations of using C#? So far I've seen very few people willing to
mention anything "bad" about it, but every language has it's faults.
We would be using C# in the .NET Framework and building with Visual
Studio .NET (I assume there are other compilers though I haven't
looked). My biggest concern is something I read once, that the C#
compiler in VS will not produce object files for later linking so any
changes require the entire project to be recompiled. Is this true?
Are there any other things that may be a consideration for a
large-scale project (several hundred thousand lines of code at a
minimum)?


C# can be compiled very fast, but you should certainly consider
splitting a project like that into several assemblies, which will help
matters.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.co m>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 15 '05 #2
I have done a project in C# almost 20,000 lines of code without trouble, you can see others projects like ROTOR o MONO, which have a lot more. You have a C# from Borland, and I guest that this answer all question except 1 the object files, and I don't have an answer for that.
--
Bela Istok
MVP C#
Caracas, Venezuela
"Wilbur" <fo*****@yaho o-dot-com.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message news:40******** **@Usenet.com.. .
My company is considering using C# for a large project and it is a
language I'm only just now becoming familiar with. For the most part
I like it and that seems to be the most logical choice as far as
future support. My question is: what are the disadvantages or
limitations of using C#? So far I've seen very few people willing to
mention anything "bad" about it, but every language has it's faults.
We would be using C# in the .NET Framework and building with Visual
Studio .NET (I assume there are other compilers though I haven't
looked). My biggest concern is something I read once, that the C#
compiler in VS will not produce object files for later linking so any
changes require the entire project to be recompiled. Is this true?
Are there any other things that may be a consideration for a
large-scale project (several hundred thousand lines of code at a
minimum)?
Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
----------------------------------------------------------
** SPEED ** RETENTION ** COMPLETION ** ANONYMITY **
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.usenet.com
Nov 15 '05 #3
I know they are reworking the whole build environment for Whidbey and LH.
Not that that helps you now. Not sure about the object module deal.
Obviously, if you use dll assemblies, those that don't change - don't need
to be rebuilt. So team1 working on dll1, dll2 can rebuild their own stuff
and team 2 using dll1, and dll2 just ref the binaries, so they don't need to
rebuild anything but their own stuff. As far as c# goes, after using it for
awhile, I can't imagine programming in anything else now. I can think in
c#, I can't say that for the other languages I used over the years.
--wjs

"Wilbur" <fo*****@yaho o-dot-com.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
news:40******** **@Usenet.com.. .
My company is considering using C# for a large project and it is a
language I'm only just now becoming familiar with. For the most part
I like it and that seems to be the most logical choice as far as
future support. My question is: what are the disadvantages or
limitations of using C#? So far I've seen very few people willing to
mention anything "bad" about it, but every language has it's faults.
We would be using C# in the .NET Framework and building with Visual
Studio .NET (I assume there are other compilers though I haven't
looked). My biggest concern is something I read once, that the C#
compiler in VS will not produce object files for later linking so any
changes require the entire project to be recompiled. Is this true?
Are there any other things that may be a consideration for a
large-scale project (several hundred thousand lines of code at a
minimum)?
Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
----------------------------------------------------------
** SPEED ** RETENTION ** COMPLETION ** ANONYMITY **
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.usenet.com

Nov 15 '05 #4
C# doesn't support multiple-inheritance. It supports a 'form' of MI by
allowing multiple *interfaces*, but this only benefits the user of the class,
not the implementor.

Don't bother responding to this message that "MI is bad" -- it isn't, it is a
powerful language feature that can be misused, but that doen't make it bad.

Not specific to C#, but the 'new' (now in its second revision) development
environment and compilers are extremely poor. There are a lot of issues, most
subjective, but some of the compiler warning/error messages are extremely
unhelpful and provide virtually no context. Migration from existing
(non-trivial) C++ projects to C# can be particularly tedious -- 1/2 the time
spent on the port, 1/2 the time spent trying to isolate the mystery errors.

It will take at least two more versions of the product before it is truly
usable and refined.

Wilbur wrote:

My company is considering using C# for a large project and it is a
language I'm only just now becoming familiar with. For the most part
I like it and that seems to be the most logical choice as far as
future support. My question is: what are the disadvantages or
limitations of using C#? So far I've seen very few people willing to
mention anything "bad" about it, but every language has it's faults.
We would be using C# in the .NET Framework and building with Visual
Studio .NET (I assume there are other compilers though I haven't
looked). My biggest concern is something I read once, that the C#
compiler in VS will not produce object files for later linking so any
changes require the entire project to be recompiled. Is this true?
Are there any other things that may be a consideration for a
large-scale project (several hundred thousand lines of code at a
minimum)?

Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
----------------------------------------------------------
** SPEED ** RETENTION ** COMPLETION ** ANONYMITY **
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.usenet.com


--
Bret Pehrson
mailto:br**@inf owest.com
NOSPAM - Include this key in all e-mail correspondence <<38952rglkwdsl >>
Nov 15 '05 #5
I won't list the advantages since I guess it is easy enough to figure those
out. Suffice it to say that despite the disadvantages my productivity has
increased with .NET and C# as compared to unmanaged programming.

I used to work with C++ for many years after which I switched over to C#
almost exclusively. All in all, I've got only a few issues with C#.
- no templates and thus no easy type-safe collections. In the beginning
having to downcast felt like returning to the stone age; now it doesn't
bother me that much (that is about to change though with generics in C#)
- no deterministic destructors and thus no RAII (and thus managing
_unmanaged_ resources can become more complicated) (well this is not really
a language but rather a CLR issue)
- no typedefs (typedefs were most useful with complex template types, so
with no templates it was not that much of an issue)
- the fact that the whole class is defined in a single file felt like a
limitation at first but it does not bother me any more
- not having multiple inheritance may be a limitation but that really
depends more on your style - I tend to avoid it even with C++

There are issues with working with VS.NET and C# in team environments in
complex projects, as is evident e.g., in this thread:
http://tinyurl.com/2e2mw. My experiences were very similar and it
occasionally does require an untrivial amount of working around to make
things happen.

Regards,
Sami
"Wilbur" <fo*****@yaho o-dot-com.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
news:40******** **@Usenet.com.. .
My company is considering using C# for a large project and it is a
language I'm only just now becoming familiar with. For the most part
I like it and that seems to be the most logical choice as far as
future support. My question is: what are the disadvantages or
limitations of using C#? So far I've seen very few people willing to
mention anything "bad" about it, but every language has it's faults.
We would be using C# in the .NET Framework and building with Visual
Studio .NET (I assume there are other compilers though I haven't
looked). My biggest concern is something I read once, that the C#
compiler in VS will not produce object files for later linking so any
changes require the entire project to be recompiled. Is this true?
Are there any other things that may be a consideration for a
large-scale project (several hundred thousand lines of code at a
minimum)?
Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
----------------------------------------------------------
** SPEED ** RETENTION ** COMPLETION ** ANONYMITY **
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.usenet.com

Nov 15 '05 #6
Bret Pehrson <br**@infowest. com> wrote:
Not specific to C#, but the 'new' (now in its second revision) development
environment and compilers are extremely poor. There are a lot of issues, most
subjective, but some of the compiler warning/error messages are extremely
unhelpful and provide virtually no context. Migration from existing
(non-trivial) C++ projects to C# can be particularly tedious -- 1/2 the time
spent on the port, 1/2 the time spent trying to isolate the mystery errors.


While I know there are problems with VS.NET's designer (and the IDE
lacks important things like refactoring), I find the compiler
errors/warnings almost always reasonable - certainly compared with
those from MS's C++ compiler in VS6!

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.co m>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 15 '05 #7
The same here! VC# error and warning messages are absolutely great compared with previous VC++ versions.

However, C# language also has some limitations, and many of them are to be addressed in C# 2.0 (coming with Visual Studio .NET and ADO .NET code-named "Whidbey"). To read more about the new features, search for "Whidbey" on MSDN.

--
Sorin Dolha [MCP, MCAD]
"Jon Skeet [C# MVP]" <sk***@pobox.co m> wrote in message news:MP******** *************** @msnews.microso ft.com...
Bret Pehrson <br**@infowest. com> wrote:
Not specific to C#, but the 'new' (now in its second revision) development
environment and compilers are extremely poor. There are a lot of issues, most
subjective, but some of the compiler warning/error messages are extremely
unhelpful and provide virtually no context. Migration from existing
(non-trivial) C++ projects to C# can be particularly tedious -- 1/2 the time
spent on the port, 1/2 the time spent trying to isolate the mystery errors.


While I know there are problems with VS.NET's designer (and the IDE
lacks important things like refactoring), I find the compiler
errors/warnings almost always reasonable - certainly compared with
those from MS's C++ compiler in VS6!

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.co m>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 15 '05 #8
Winforms do not refactor at all. The resx files once set theyre impossible
to refactor without d.icking it all up

"Jon Skeet [C# MVP]" <sk***@pobox.co m> wrote in message
news:MP******** *************** @msnews.microso ft.com...
Bret Pehrson <br**@infowest. com> wrote:
Not specific to C#, but the 'new' (now in its second revision) development environment and compilers are extremely poor. There are a lot of issues, most subjective, but some of the compiler warning/error messages are extremely unhelpful and provide virtually no context. Migration from existing
(non-trivial) C++ projects to C# can be particularly tedious -- 1/2 the time spent on the port, 1/2 the time spent trying to isolate the mystery
errors.
While I know there are problems with VS.NET's designer (and the IDE
lacks important things like refactoring), I find the compiler
errors/warnings almost always reasonable - certainly compared with
those from MS's C++ compiler in VS6!

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.co m>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too

Nov 15 '05 #9

This thread has been closed and replies have been disabled. Please start a new discussion.

Similar topics

3
41545
by: enchantingdb | last post by:
I have an exam tomorrow that covers the perceived advantages and disadvantages of object oriented programming, in particular polymorphism, inheritance and encapsulation. I know the advantages but am not clear on the disadvantages. I have had a look on the Web and in newsgroups but couldn't find much. As time is running out, I thought I would post here and hope that someone would reply. Thanks Rob
21
11221
by: EmJayEm | last post by:
Can someone tell me the Disadvantages/Cons of web services? Thanks, EmJ.
54
6519
by: m.roello | last post by:
In the book: "Working with Microsoft Visual Studio 2005" Craig Skibo wrote: "The power of Visual Studio 2005 lies in its ability to empower users to build, test, and debug powerful applications quickly and easly." I don't agree on what concernes ASP .NET Web Sites in VS2005. All what involves Namespaces in Web sites has been disappeared. I know you can still MANUALLY manage them, but not QUICKLY and EASLY. In a
1
3945
by: Husam | last post by:
Hi EveryBody: I have research about advantages and disadvantages of C++ languages In one of my programming courses. Can Any one help me and told me about advantages and disadvantages of C++ or redirect me to some web sites proffessinal about this kind of reserach ? any help will be appreciated
11
7345
by: GVN | last post by:
Hi All, Can anyone guide me when asynchronous method calls will be benificial? Are there any disadvantages of using asynchronous calls? Thanks,
1
3783
by: Amit | last post by:
can anyone in the forum tell what are main disadvantages/limitations that dontnetnuke has??
1
9177
by: vumani | last post by:
what is the advantages and disadvantages of Ms SQL server and java servletts front-end on the clien end. what is the advantages and disadvantages of Ms Access on the server, connected via JDBC and java on the client end. what is the advantages and disadvantages of HTML on the client end,coupled with SQL server and ODBL on the server end.
0
9979
marktang
by: marktang | last post by:
ONU (Optical Network Unit) is one of the key components for providing high-speed Internet services. Its primary function is to act as an endpoint device located at the user's premises. However, people are often confused as to whether an ONU can Work As a Router. In this blog post, we’ll explore What is ONU, What Is Router, ONU & Router’s main usage, and What is the difference between ONU and Router. Let’s take a closer look ! Part I. Meaning of...
0
9826
by: Hystou | last post by:
Most computers default to English, but sometimes we require a different language, especially when relocating. Forgot to request a specific language before your computer shipped? No problem! You can effortlessly switch the default language on Windows 10 without reinstalling. I'll walk you through it. First, let's disable language synchronization. With a Microsoft account, language settings sync across devices. To prevent any complications,...
0
11234
Oralloy
by: Oralloy | last post by:
Hello folks, I am unable to find appropriate documentation on the type promotion of bit-fields when using the generalised comparison operator "<=>". The problem is that using the GNU compilers, it seems that the internal comparison operator "<=>" tries to promote arguments from unsigned to signed. This is as boiled down as I can make it. Here is my compilation command: g++-12 -std=c++20 -Wnarrowing bit_field.cpp Here is the code in...
0
10468
tracyyun
by: tracyyun | last post by:
Dear forum friends, With the development of smart home technology, a variety of wireless communication protocols have appeared on the market, such as Zigbee, Z-Wave, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, etc. Each protocol has its own unique characteristics and advantages, but as a user who is planning to build a smart home system, I am a bit confused by the choice of these technologies. I'm particularly interested in Zigbee because I've heard it does some...
1
8018
isladogs
by: isladogs | last post by:
The next Access Europe User Group meeting will be on Wednesday 1 May 2024 starting at 18:00 UK time (6PM UTC+1) and finishing by 19:30 (7.30PM). In this session, we are pleased to welcome a new presenter, Adolph Dupré who will be discussing some powerful techniques for using class modules. He will explain when you may want to use classes instead of User Defined Types (UDT). For example, to manage the data in unbound forms. Adolph will...
0
7171
by: conductexam | last post by:
I have .net C# application in which I am extracting data from word file and save it in database particularly. To store word all data as it is I am converting the whole word file firstly in HTML and then checking html paragraph one by one. At the time of converting from word file to html my equations which are in the word document file was convert into image. Globals.ThisAddIn.Application.ActiveDocument.Select();...
0
5854
by: TSSRALBI | last post by:
Hello I'm a network technician in training and I need your help. I am currently learning how to create and manage the different types of VPNs and I have a question about LAN-to-LAN VPNs. The last exercise I practiced was to create a LAN-to-LAN VPN between two Pfsense firewalls, by using IPSEC protocols. I succeeded, with both firewalls in the same network. But I'm wondering if it's possible to do the same thing, with 2 Pfsense firewalls...
0
6058
by: adsilva | last post by:
A Windows Forms form does not have the event Unload, like VB6. What one acts like?
2
4276
muto222
by: muto222 | last post by:
How can i add a mobile payment intergratation into php mysql website.

By using Bytes.com and it's services, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

To disable or enable advertisements and analytics tracking please visit the manage ads & tracking page.