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C# Multithreading Book Recommendation

Can anyone suggest the best book or part of a book on this subject. I'm
looking for an in-depth treatment with examples in C#

TIA
Robert Zurer
ro****@zurer.co m
Nov 15 '05 #1
16 8516
There doesn't seem to be a book like this. I've been looking for the same
thing.

"Robert Zurer" <ro****@zurer.c om> wrote in message
news:eo******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP12.phx.gbl...
Can anyone suggest the best book or part of a book on this subject. I'm
looking for an in-depth treatment with examples in C#

TIA
Robert Zurer
ro****@zurer.co m

Nov 15 '05 #2
No no, there are several. I have a book recommendation section on my website
if you want to get a quick heads up, but basically if you want to know
threads intimately you must get Richters book. You should have it anyway. In
addition, there is a lot of threading material covered in mathew macdonald's
book on remoting. These two books together demystify threads. At least, you
get the theory right on what you are supposed to do, then you get to spend
another 10 years learning how to master it. It really does take that long,
anybody tell you differently, they're just trying to sell you something.

--
Regards,
Alvin Bruney
Got DotNet? Get it here...
http://www.networkip.net/dotnet/tidbits/default.htm
"Mountain Bikn' Guy" <vc@attbi.com > wrote in message
news:CMHBb.5006 73$Fm2.480588@a ttbi_s04...
There doesn't seem to be a book like this. I've been looking for the same
thing.

"Robert Zurer" <ro****@zurer.c om> wrote in message
news:eo******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP12.phx.gbl...
Can anyone suggest the best book or part of a book on this subject. I'm
looking for an in-depth treatment with examples in C#

TIA
Robert Zurer
ro****@zurer.co m


Nov 15 '05 #3
Alvin,
Thanks for the info. I know about Richter's book. It has gotten really good
reviews on Amazon. I also like MacDonald's writing. I guess I jumped to a
false conclusion regarding what the OP seemed to be asking for. I assumed he
wanted what I want -- a COMPLETE book devoted just to .NET threading (using
C# examples). We have complete books for Win32 and C/C++ threading, so why
not a complete book for .NET/C#? I'm still looking for it...
Regards,
Mountain

P.S. In my opinion (worth 2 cents), using .NET well, together with an
architectural-level state machine approach, one could have the equivalent
level of performance and reliability in their finished code as a 10 year+
threading master -- and in short order.

"Alvin Bruney" <vapor at steaming post office> wrote in message
news:OJ******** *****@TK2MSFTNG P09.phx.gbl...
No no, there are several. I have a book recommendation section on my website if you want to get a quick heads up, but basically if you want to know
threads intimately you must get Richters book. You should have it anyway. In addition, there is a lot of threading material covered in mathew macdonald's book on remoting. These two books together demystify threads. At least, you get the theory right on what you are supposed to do, then you get to spend
another 10 years learning how to master it. It really does take that long,
anybody tell you differently, they're just trying to sell you something.

--
Regards,
Alvin Bruney
Got DotNet? Get it here...
http://www.networkip.net/dotnet/tidbits/default.htm
"Mountain Bikn' Guy" <vc@attbi.com > wrote in message
news:CMHBb.5006 73$Fm2.480588@a ttbi_s04...
There doesn't seem to be a book like this. I've been looking for the same thing.

"Robert Zurer" <ro****@zurer.c om> wrote in message
news:eo******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP12.phx.gbl...
Can anyone suggest the best book or part of a book on this subject. I'm looking for an in-depth treatment with examples in C#

TIA
Robert Zurer
ro****@zurer.co m



Nov 15 '05 #4
I'm looking for that book as well. Let me know when you find it, especially
one geared toward asp.net since the object model is different and some
threading rules either are different or don't apply entirely.

--
Regards,
Alvin Bruney
Got DotNet? Get it here...
http://www.networkip.net/dotnet/tidbits/default.htm
"Mountain Bikn' Guy" <vc@attbi.com > wrote in message
news:1sMBb.3022 34$Dw6.1006075@ attbi_s02...
Alvin,
Thanks for the info. I know about Richter's book. It has gotten really good reviews on Amazon. I also like MacDonald's writing. I guess I jumped to a
false conclusion regarding what the OP seemed to be asking for. I assumed he wanted what I want -- a COMPLETE book devoted just to .NET threading (using C# examples). We have complete books for Win32 and C/C++ threading, so why
not a complete book for .NET/C#? I'm still looking for it...
Regards,
Mountain

P.S. In my opinion (worth 2 cents), using .NET well, together with an
architectural-level state machine approach, one could have the equivalent
level of performance and reliability in their finished code as a 10 year+
threading master -- and in short order.

"Alvin Bruney" <vapor at steaming post office> wrote in message
news:OJ******** *****@TK2MSFTNG P09.phx.gbl...
No no, there are several. I have a book recommendation section on my website
if you want to get a quick heads up, but basically if you want to know
threads intimately you must get Richters book. You should have it anyway. In
addition, there is a lot of threading material covered in mathew

macdonald's
book on remoting. These two books together demystify threads. At least,

you
get the theory right on what you are supposed to do, then you get to spend another 10 years learning how to master it. It really does take that long, anybody tell you differently, they're just trying to sell you something.

--
Regards,
Alvin Bruney
Got DotNet? Get it here...
http://www.networkip.net/dotnet/tidbits/default.htm
"Mountain Bikn' Guy" <vc@attbi.com > wrote in message
news:CMHBb.5006 73$Fm2.480588@a ttbi_s04...
There doesn't seem to be a book like this. I've been looking for the

same thing.

"Robert Zurer" <ro****@zurer.c om> wrote in message
news:eo******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP12.phx.gbl...
> Can anyone suggest the best book or part of a book on this subject. I'm > looking for an in-depth treatment with examples in C#
>
> TIA
>
>
> Robert Zurer
> ro****@zurer.co m
>
>



Nov 15 '05 #5
BTW, I should also have qualified my statement even further:
"I want a really good complete book devoted just to .NET threading (using
C# examples)."

If I didn't add that qualification ("realy good"), I'm sure someone would
point me to a book like ".NET Multithreading"
by Alan L. Dennis (or one of a couple other similar titles). (No offense
meant to the author, but the reviews of this book on Amazon make it sound
like a book I would not be willing purchase -- therefore I don't count it
amoung my options in the search for a good .NET threading book.)
"Alvin Bruney" <vapor at steaming post office> wrote in message
news:Oa******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP12.phx.gbl...
I'm looking for that book as well. Let me know when you find it, especially one geared toward asp.net since the object model is different and some
threading rules either are different or don't apply entirely.

--
Regards,
Alvin Bruney
Got DotNet? Get it here...
http://www.networkip.net/dotnet/tidbits/default.htm
"Mountain Bikn' Guy" <vc@attbi.com > wrote in message
news:1sMBb.3022 34$Dw6.1006075@ attbi_s02...
Alvin,
Thanks for the info. I know about Richter's book. It has gotten really good
reviews on Amazon. I also like MacDonald's writing. I guess I jumped to a
false conclusion regarding what the OP seemed to be asking for. I assumed he
wanted what I want -- a COMPLETE book devoted just to .NET threading

(using
C# examples). We have complete books for Win32 and C/C++ threading, so

why not a complete book for .NET/C#? I'm still looking for it...
Regards,
Mountain

P.S. In my opinion (worth 2 cents), using .NET well, together with an
architectural-level state machine approach, one could have the equivalent level of performance and reliability in their finished code as a 10 year+ threading master -- and in short order.

"Alvin Bruney" <vapor at steaming post office> wrote in message
news:OJ******** *****@TK2MSFTNG P09.phx.gbl...
No no, there are several. I have a book recommendation section on my

website
if you want to get a quick heads up, but basically if you want to know
threads intimately you must get Richters book. You should have it anyway.
In
addition, there is a lot of threading material covered in mathew

macdonald's
book on remoting. These two books together demystify threads. At least, you
get the theory right on what you are supposed to do, then you get to spend another 10 years learning how to master it. It really does take that long, anybody tell you differently, they're just trying to sell you

something.
--
Regards,
Alvin Bruney
Got DotNet? Get it here...
http://www.networkip.net/dotnet/tidbits/default.htm
"Mountain Bikn' Guy" <vc@attbi.com > wrote in message
news:CMHBb.5006 73$Fm2.480588@a ttbi_s04...
> There doesn't seem to be a book like this. I've been looking for the

same
> thing.
>
> "Robert Zurer" <ro****@zurer.c om> wrote in message
> news:eo******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP12.phx.gbl...
> > Can anyone suggest the best book or part of a book on this

subject. I'm
> > looking for an in-depth treatment with examples in C#
> >
> > TIA
> >
> >
> > Robert Zurer
> > ro****@zurer.co m
> >
> >
>
>



Nov 15 '05 #6
Mountain Bikn' Guy <vc@attbi.com > wrote:
P.S. In my opinion (worth 2 cents), using .NET well, together with an
architectural-level state machine approach, one could have the equivalent
level of performance and reliability in their finished code as a 10 year+
threading master -- and in short order.


I have to quibble with that - while I'm not sure about Alvin's 10 year+
quote, unless you understand the specific threading model of whatever
you're coding against, you *will* run the risk of reliability problems
- perhaps not on today's hardware, but on hardware which might have a
CLR implementation which is closer to the limits of the specified
memory model. It would be easy to make mistakes like the double-checked
locking algorithm which doesn't work in .NET, but for subtle reasons.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.co m>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 15 '05 #7

"Jon Skeet [C# MVP]" <sk***@pobox.co m> wrote in message
news:MP******** *************** *@msnews.micros oft.com...
Mountain Bikn' Guy <vc@attbi.com > wrote:
P.S. In my opinion (worth 2 cents), using .NET well, together with an
architectural-level state machine approach, one could have the equivalent level of performance and reliability in their finished code as a 10 year+ threading master -- and in short order.


I have to quibble with that - while I'm not sure about Alvin's 10 year+
quote, unless you understand the specific threading model of whatever
you're coding against, you *will* run the risk of reliability problems
- perhaps not on today's hardware, but on hardware which might have a
CLR implementation which is closer to the limits of the specified
memory model. It would be easy to make mistakes like the double-checked
locking algorithm which doesn't work in .NET, but for subtle reasons.


My statement was expressing my hope more than any factual reasoning.
However, this hope isn't based purely on wishful thinking. My own gameplan
is to use a bit of a paradigm shift. The best way to solve any problem is to
rise above the level of the problem. I feel most (all) threading problems
can be avoided at their source via a change in software development style
(i.e., architecture). For example, see
(http://www.quantum-leaps.com/com/qfplus.htm) and note this quote:
"An application running on QF+ is guaranteed to be free of multi-thread
problems." The Quantum Programming paradigm may not be everyone's cup of
tea, but I have no doubt the tools and knowledge are available to allow me
to master multi-threading issues in much less than 10+ years.
Nov 15 '05 #8
Mountain Bikn' Guy <vc@attbi.com > wrote:
My statement was expressing my hope more than any factual reasoning.
However, this hope isn't based purely on wishful thinking. My own gameplan
is to use a bit of a paradigm shift. The best way to solve any problem is to
rise above the level of the problem. I feel most (all) threading problems
can be avoided at their source via a change in software development style
(i.e., architecture). For example, see
(http://www.quantum-leaps.com/com/qfplus.htm) and note this quote:
"An application running on QF+ is guaranteed to be free of multi-thread
problems." The Quantum Programming paradigm may not be everyone's cup of
tea, but I have no doubt the tools and knowledge are available to allow me
to master multi-threading issues in much less than 10+ years.


That may well be appropriate in some situations - and where it is,
that's great. I don't think it will solve *all* problems by a long
chalk, however, and from the little it says on that single page (which
is all I've looked at) it wouldn't scale well for various things which
really *require* more than one thing to be going on at a time.

--
Jon Skeet - <sk***@pobox.co m>
http://www.pobox.com/~skeet
If replying to the group, please do not mail me too
Nov 15 '05 #9

"Jon Skeet [C# MVP]" <sk***@pobox.co m> wrote in message
news:MP******** *************** *@msnews.micros oft.com...
Mountain Bikn' Guy <vc@attbi.com > wrote:
My statement was expressing my hope more than any factual reasoning.
However, this hope isn't based purely on wishful thinking. My own gameplan is to use a bit of a paradigm shift. The best way to solve any problem is to rise above the level of the problem. I feel most (all) threading problems can be avoided at their source via a change in software development style (i.e., architecture). For example, see
(http://www.quantum-leaps.com/com/qfplus.htm) and note this quote:
"An application running on QF+ is guaranteed to be free of multi-thread
problems." The Quantum Programming paradigm may not be everyone's cup of
tea, but I have no doubt the tools and knowledge are available to allow me to master multi-threading issues in much less than 10+ years.


That may well be appropriate in some situations - and where it is,
that's great. I don't think it will solve *all* problems by a long
chalk, however, and from the little it says on that single page (which
is all I've looked at) it wouldn't scale well for various things which
really *require* more than one thing to be going on at a time.


Jon,
I don't expect you or anyone else to agree with me on this, but my opinion
(reflecting the paradigm shift I mentioned) is that Quantum Programming (or
an approach like it) will solve most problems better than today's OOP. It
may not solve all problems -- but I don't guess any single approach ever
will. However, there is the traditional approach to multi-threading, which
is filled with pitfalls. And then there are better approaches. I believe
Quantum Programming ("QP") is one of those better approaches.

QP includes the concept of active object computing. Here's an explanation
from the web site list above:

"Perhaps the most important characteristics of active object-based computing
model is that individual active objects can be programmed internally with
purely sequential techniques thus avoiding most of the hazards of
traditional multithreading (such as race conditions, deadlock, starvation,
or priority inversion). Yet, an active object application (as a whole) can
reap all the benefits of concurrent programming, such as fast task-level
response, good CPU utilization, and scalability."

I personally have no doubt that this approach will scale better than most
approaches commonly in use today. A similar technique is part of the
patented technology of Z-force (http://www.z-force.com/) and an
investigation of their accomplishments should put any scalability doubts to
rest -- actually, that's an understatement. Traditional approaches can not
match the scalability of an approach like the one I'm discussing.

Regards,
Mountain
Nov 15 '05 #10

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