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Does FullText warning mean any update to text field will not be reflected?

P: n/a
Hi all,

Maybe this belongs in the Full Text group but I am writing an ASP.NET
application with a SQL Server 2005 backend, so I am posing the question
here.

I have been using fulltext search on a text field for a while because
originally the field was only being updated nightly and I could
repopulate/rebuild the index nightly. Now I will be allowing users to Update
the field in real-time. I am using a simple Update SQL statement to modify
the contents of that field.

Does the warning below mean that a fulltext search performed on the field
after a simple Update will not reflect the changes?

I would hate to have to go back to a LIKE syntax on the field as CONTAINS
seems to work better and faster, especially when multiple keywords are used
in the search.

The syntax I used to create the index is as follows:
--------------------------------------------------
CREATE FULLTEXT INDEX ON dbo.List_Summary (summary, List_Name1 )
KEY INDEX PK_List_Summary ON PCFullTextCatalog
WITH CHANGE_TRACKING AUTO

Warning: Table or indexed view 'dbo.List_Summary' has full-text indexed
columns that are of type image, text, or ntext. Full-text change tracking
cannot track WRITETEXT or UPDATETEXT operations performed on these columns.
-------------------------------------------------

Do I have a problem here by allowing real-time Updates of the text field? If
so, is there a way to make sure the index gets updated after the Update
statement?

There may be as many as 20 or 30 users running searches simultaneously, so
of course I am concerned about concurrency if I must rebuild the index with
every update.

Thanks for any help with this.

Jun 27 '08 #1
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2 Replies


P: n/a
it means if you use writetext or update text staments (which allow partial
updates of the field data) then the index is not update. if you use insert or
update statements then the index is updated.

-- bruce (sqlwork.com)
"John Kotuby" wrote:
Hi all,

Maybe this belongs in the Full Text group but I am writing an ASP.NET
application with a SQL Server 2005 backend, so I am posing the question
here.

I have been using fulltext search on a text field for a while because
originally the field was only being updated nightly and I could
repopulate/rebuild the index nightly. Now I will be allowing users to Update
the field in real-time. I am using a simple Update SQL statement to modify
the contents of that field.

Does the warning below mean that a fulltext search performed on the field
after a simple Update will not reflect the changes?

I would hate to have to go back to a LIKE syntax on the field as CONTAINS
seems to work better and faster, especially when multiple keywords are used
in the search.

The syntax I used to create the index is as follows:
--------------------------------------------------
CREATE FULLTEXT INDEX ON dbo.List_Summary (summary, List_Name1 )
KEY INDEX PK_List_Summary ON PCFullTextCatalog
WITH CHANGE_TRACKING AUTO

Warning: Table or indexed view 'dbo.List_Summary' has full-text indexed
columns that are of type image, text, or ntext. Full-text change tracking
cannot track WRITETEXT or UPDATETEXT operations performed on these columns.
-------------------------------------------------

Do I have a problem here by allowing real-time Updates of the text field? If
so, is there a way to make sure the index gets updated after the Update
statement?

There may be as many as 20 or 30 users running searches simultaneously, so
of course I am concerned about concurrency if I must rebuild the index with
every update.

Thanks for any help with this.

Jun 27 '08 #2

P: n/a
Thanks Bruce,
that is what I was hoping for.
"bruce barker" <br*********@discussions.microsoft.comwrote in message
news:CE**********************************@microsof t.com...
it means if you use writetext or update text staments (which allow partial
updates of the field data) then the index is not update. if you use insert
or
update statements then the index is updated.

-- bruce (sqlwork.com)
"John Kotuby" wrote:
>Hi all,

Maybe this belongs in the Full Text group but I am writing an ASP.NET
application with a SQL Server 2005 backend, so I am posing the question
here.

I have been using fulltext search on a text field for a while because
originally the field was only being updated nightly and I could
repopulate/rebuild the index nightly. Now I will be allowing users to
Update
the field in real-time. I am using a simple Update SQL statement to
modify
the contents of that field.

Does the warning below mean that a fulltext search performed on the field
after a simple Update will not reflect the changes?

I would hate to have to go back to a LIKE syntax on the field as CONTAINS
seems to work better and faster, especially when multiple keywords are
used
in the search.

The syntax I used to create the index is as follows:
--------------------------------------------------
CREATE FULLTEXT INDEX ON dbo.List_Summary (summary, List_Name1 )
KEY INDEX PK_List_Summary ON PCFullTextCatalog
WITH CHANGE_TRACKING AUTO

Warning: Table or indexed view 'dbo.List_Summary' has full-text indexed
columns that are of type image, text, or ntext. Full-text change tracking
cannot track WRITETEXT or UPDATETEXT operations performed on these
columns.
-------------------------------------------------

Do I have a problem here by allowing real-time Updates of the text field?
If
so, is there a way to make sure the index gets updated after the Update
statement?

There may be as many as 20 or 30 users running searches simultaneously,
so
of course I am concerned about concurrency if I must rebuild the index
with
every update.

Thanks for any help with this.

Jun 27 '08 #3

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