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Moving to Java or stay with ASP.NET ?

Hello,

Just looking for some feedback.

I have an intermediate level of ASP.NET. Since some time ago, I liked
to learn Java.

However, my hughe problem is time: working many hours every day and
studying IT project managment at university at night, don't leave me
time to learn Java.

So, I decided that my best choice is to stay with ASP.NET and .NET
Framework Technology. It's more easy for me to go deep down under .NET
technology than learning Java from scratch.

I wanted to learn Java because I think that it can get me more
opportunities on the market: there are companies that because of budget
restriction, don't want to spend money in licenses and need to run
software on Linux servers. That's a territory that .NET won't get. I
don't think that Mono project could achieve this.

However, I think (correct me if I'm wrong) that Java lacks one
important thing: a comfortable IDE for fast develop. And there are so
many "flavours" of Java's IDE out there, each one with its own
functionalities and none of them is as good as .NET IDE.

My question is:
How do you see .NET in the next three years? Would be a good investing
of time and effort to still study .NET or would Java become a better
choice than .NET?

Sep 30 '06 #1
2 2277
You have to base this on your market, if you are unwilling or unable to
move.

Personally, there are more than enough .NET jobs in Nashville, TN, where I
live. So many, in fact, we can't find good talent for many of them. Thus,
the market pays well for good .NET developers. Conversely, there are three
companies of enough size to merit notice that program in Java. If you were
to invest in Java in this market, I would consider you stupid. Where you
are, the story may be the opposite.

Take some time to investigate the market you are going to live in or
markets, if you have a few. If you find all of the jobs are Java jobs, it
might be worth switching gears. If not, stick with .NET and hone your
skills.

--
Gregory A. Beamer
MVP; MCP: +I, SE, SD, DBA
http://gregorybeamer.spaces.live.com

*************************************************
Think outside of the box!
*************************************************
"Big George" <jb*****@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11*********************@h48g2000cwc.googlegro ups.com...
Hello,

Just looking for some feedback.

I have an intermediate level of ASP.NET. Since some time ago, I liked
to learn Java.

However, my hughe problem is time: working many hours every day and
studying IT project managment at university at night, don't leave me
time to learn Java.

So, I decided that my best choice is to stay with ASP.NET and .NET
Framework Technology. It's more easy for me to go deep down under .NET
technology than learning Java from scratch.

I wanted to learn Java because I think that it can get me more
opportunities on the market: there are companies that because of budget
restriction, don't want to spend money in licenses and need to run
software on Linux servers. That's a territory that .NET won't get. I
don't think that Mono project could achieve this.

However, I think (correct me if I'm wrong) that Java lacks one
important thing: a comfortable IDE for fast develop. And there are so
many "flavours" of Java's IDE out there, each one with its own
functionalities and none of them is as good as .NET IDE.

My question is:
How do you see .NET in the next three years? Would be a good investing
of time and effort to still study .NET or would Java become a better
choice than .NET?

Sep 30 '06 #2
Big George wrote:
Hello,

Just looking for some feedback.

I have an intermediate level of ASP.NET. Since some time ago, I liked
to learn Java.

However, my hughe problem is time: working many hours every day and
studying IT project managment at university at night, don't leave me
time to learn Java.
<snip>
My question is:
How do you see .NET in the next three years? Would be a good investing
of time and effort to still study .NET or would Java become a better
choice than .NET?
I'd like to base my answer on the technology only, and deliberately
ignore the market for a while (Gregory's reply makes total sense IMHO).
I think that to have practiced both Java and .NET is an advantage,
because they are very close, and to understand some concepts in Java
will help you understand .NET better. However, I think that if you don't
have time for both (which is legitimate), I would concentrate on .NET
(since you have experience in it already), and study it in depth. I have
10+ years experience as a programmer, of these 4+ years in .NET, and I
still have so much to learn. The "jump" to Java or another similar
technology will be easier to make later if you understand .NET in-depth.

HTH,
Laurent
--
Laurent Bugnion, GalaSoft
Software engineering: http://www.galasoft-LB.ch
PhotoAlbum: http://www.galasoft-LB.ch/pictures
Support children in Calcutta: http://www.calcutta-espoir.ch
Oct 1 '06 #3

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