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Disadvantages in Visual Studio 2005 (Web sites)

In the book:
"Working with Microsoft Visual Studio 2005"
Craig Skibo wrote:
"The power of Visual Studio 2005 lies in its ability to empower users to
build, test, and debug powerful applications quickly and easly."

I don't agree on what concernes ASP .NET Web Sites in VS2005.

All what involves Namespaces in Web sites has been disappeared. I know
you can still MANUALLY manage them, but not QUICKLY and EASLY. In a
project I can subdivide the App_Code Folder in subfolders, but if I use
the Powerfull "Class View" Window, I'm not very glad to see an infinity
number of classes, all placed at the root of the project namespace.

Grouping in namespaces is one of the most powerful skills tha .net gave
us, since 1.0 and not only for .Net Windows Projects.

Someone could reply me that the problem is pre-compilation. I know that
now you can choose how to build your Web site, and this is very good.
But the need of defining namespaces and grouping classes is indipendent
from the way I'll decide to deploy the Web Site.

Is this a "by design" issue?. Or it is a bug? In my opinion is a BIG
black hole.

I'm sorry for this lines, but I'm tired to search for workarounds for an
IDE, abive all when a functionality was already present in the previous
version.

Marco Roello
ma**********@cnrservice.it
Jan 26 '06
54 6006
abunet wrote:
Peter, you're the first person that have understood the meaning of this
thread. It make me less afraid to be the only one that belives in
compatibility.

Peter Franks ha scritto:
Their CONSTANT changing of approaches. MS completely alienates their
existing base of users with each release; always concerned about
attracting new users with 'new and better ways'.


Couldn't agree more. One reason I love my Delphi :-)

<gd&r>

--
Robin.
<disclaimer> Not an expert </disclaimer>
Feb 2 '06 #51
> difference at all to you. If you cannot create a website using a text
editor and the .NET Framework (any version), then you need to step back
first and reevaluate your programming skills.
Nobody said this... Just because, for example, you can create master pages
within master pages in code does not mean people will really start to use it
until VS2005 fully supports such a feature (currently, it does not). The
IDE is of great importance.

I could, if pressured enough, program a web site in assembler under DOS,
which was my first programming language. That does not mean that I will or
that I should, nor does that fact imply I am a better or worse programmer.
The whole purpose of the IDE is to make our programming jobs easier.
not a programmer at all. Additionally, these "disadvantages" should be
mere inconveniences, not show-stoppers in your development progress.


I'd rather stop the show than use little-known tricks that, while they work
and make me feel smart, are veryt hard to understand to a fellow competent
programmer. My customers expect more of me than that, and I really don't
like to rely on that kind of thing for job security.
Feb 3 '06 #52
I'd say that Microsoft is making more of an acknowledgement that some people
had created some fairly complex web applications that did fit the new model
than it was admitting a mistake. If it was a mistake, then the web project
model would be made available for all versions of VS 2005 (won't be
available for the Express product). Frankly, as I've stated before, I think
this new model is one of the best ideas that Microsoft has done in years.
I, for one, will continue to use the website model.
--
Christopher A. Reed
"The oxen are slow, but the earth is patient."

"Scott Allen" <sc***@nospam.odetocode.com> wrote in message
news:vg********************************@4ax.com...
On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 07:50:43 -0800, Peter Franks <no**@none.com>
wrote:
Christopher Reed wrote:
My point is that you disagree with this point of view. However, just
because you disagree with the approach doesn't mean Microsoft did
something
wrong. It just means that you're not willing to accept their change in
approach. Nothing more, nothing less.


Their CONSTANT changing of approaches. MS completely alienates their
existing base of users with each release; always concerned about
attracting new users with 'new and better ways'.


MS has essentially admitted to a mistake [1]. Although many people
like the new model, migration has proved difficult. Thus, "Web
Application Projects" [2] were born.

[1] http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archi...16/433374.aspx

[2] http://webproject.scottgu.com/

--
Scott
http://www.OdeToCode.com/blogs/scott/

Feb 3 '06 #53
Thanks for the news Scott.
This demonstrates that conflict of opinions in a "fair play" way of
communication are always usefull.

"Scott Allen" wrote:
On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 07:50:43 -0800, Peter Franks <no**@none.com>
wrote:
Christopher Reed wrote:
My point is that you disagree with this point of view. However, just
because you disagree with the approach doesn't mean Microsoft did something
wrong. It just means that you're not willing to accept their change in
approach. Nothing more, nothing less.


Their CONSTANT changing of approaches. MS completely alienates their
existing base of users with each release; always concerned about
attracting new users with 'new and better ways'.


MS has essentially admitted to a mistake [1]. Although many people
like the new model, migration has proved difficult. Thus, "Web
Application Projects" [2] were born.

[1] http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archi...16/433374.aspx

[2] http://webproject.scottgu.com/

--
Scott
http://www.OdeToCode.com/blogs/scott/

Feb 3 '06 #54
Hi Gabriel,
I could, if pressured enough, program a web site in assembler under DOS, The whole purpose of the IDE is to make our programming jobs easier.


I think you are BOTH right. He's saying everyone should _first_ learn to
create it without the IDE, then for ever after they'll have 2000% better
understanding of how it all works - this is true.

However, there are certain things (such as keeping ASPX/CS pages in
synch, using ASPX controls and using Source Control) that make a lot
more sense when you've got an IDE.

--
Gerry Hickman (London UK)
Feb 4 '06 #55

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