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common code behind pages

P: n/a
I am working in VS 2003, using VB.NET.

I have a series of pages with forms on them, an application for a DOT
number for motor carriers. The code behind them iterates through the
controls on the form, each of which have the same id as the field in
the SQL Server database they post to, so I don't have to get the data
from each field specifically.

So I use the same code for each page. I have tried to set the
CodeBehind to point to that page, but VS.NET keeps creating new
<pagename>.aspx.vb pages when I create a new page and somehow attaches
the page to the wrong CodeBehind. The project runs, but I keep getting
compiler errors.

In the old days, I'd just edit the make file... sigh.

Where are these bogus pages getting attached?

here's the compiler error:

C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\MCCI\MCCIFormPg4.aspx.vb Unable to open module file
'C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\MCCI\MCCIFormPg4.aspx.vb': The system cannot find
the file specified.

here's the CodeBehind statement from MCCIFormPg4.aspx:

<%@ Page Language="vb" AutoEventWireup="false"
Codebehind="MCCIForm.aspx.vb" Inherits="MCCI.MCCI"%>

Not only that, but whenever I make a new page, it adds a new class to
the list for that page. I don't want this - I want them to use the same
class. I guess I should have made a distinct class to hold the code
that parses the fields, and let VS.NET create it's own classes, and
then imported the generic class into the page itself... maybe I should
RTFM.

Nov 19 '05 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
Hi, Stu.

re:
I want them to use the same class.
I guess I should have made a distinct class
The best solution for this, in ASP.NET 1.1, is to compile your
class file to an assembly, placing it in the bin directory,
and importing the Namespace in your aspx pages.

That allows you to instantiate your classes in any aspx page.

In ASP.NET 2.0, you have a choice.

You can either do the same as you do for ASP.NET 1.1,
or you can place the class file ( *.vb or *.cs ) in the
application's App_Code directory.

ASP.NET 2.0 will compile any class file it finds there,
and you can reference the namespace/classes in them in your aspx files.


Juan T. Llibre, ASP.NET MVP
ASP.NET FAQ : http://asp.net.do/faq/
Foros de ASP.NET en Español : http://asp.net.do/foros/
======================================
"stumay111" <st*******@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@f14g2000cwb.googlegro ups.com...I am working in VS 2003, using VB.NET.

I have a series of pages with forms on them, an application for a DOT
number for motor carriers. The code behind them iterates through the
controls on the form, each of which have the same id as the field in
the SQL Server database they post to, so I don't have to get the data
from each field specifically.

So I use the same code for each page. I have tried to set the
CodeBehind to point to that page, but VS.NET keeps creating new
<pagename>.aspx.vb pages when I create a new page and somehow attaches
the page to the wrong CodeBehind. The project runs, but I keep getting
compiler errors.

In the old days, I'd just edit the make file... sigh.

Where are these bogus pages getting attached?

here's the compiler error:

C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\MCCI\MCCIFormPg4.aspx.vb Unable to open module file
'C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\MCCI\MCCIFormPg4.aspx.vb': The system cannot find
the file specified.

here's the CodeBehind statement from MCCIFormPg4.aspx:

<%@ Page Language="vb" AutoEventWireup="false"
Codebehind="MCCIForm.aspx.vb" Inherits="MCCI.MCCI"%>

Not only that, but whenever I make a new page, it adds a new class to
the list for that page. I don't want this - I want them to use the same
class. I guess I should have made a distinct class to hold the code
that parses the fields, and let VS.NET create it's own classes, and
then imported the generic class into the page itself... maybe I should
RTFM.

Nov 19 '05 #2

P: n/a
thanks for the quick answer! I suspected that would be the case... but
wasn't sure of the mechanism (again... RTFM, Stuart)

-s

Nov 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
LOL

I've had RTFM said to me so many times over the early years, that I
eventually stopped asking for the most part.

Regards Mr N.
"stumay111" <st*******@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@o13g2000cwo.googlegro ups.com...
thanks for the quick answer! I suspected that would be the case... but
wasn't sure of the mechanism (again... RTFM, Stuart)

-s

Nov 19 '05 #4

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