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best and the worst features

P: n/a
Hi,
I am good php programmer and want to learn asp.net.
Can someone tell me what are the best and the worst features of ASP.NET?
thanks
Nov 19 '05 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
aron t wrote:
Hi,
I am good php programmer and want to learn asp.net.
Can someone tell me what are the best and the worst features of ASP.NET?
thanks

Wow.. that's a big one to post.
I'd suggest you first hit all the "reviews" out on the net and in
magazines and post specific questions. You'll get much better answers.

--
Curt Christianson
site: http://www.darkfalz.com
blog: http://blog.darkfalz.com
Nov 19 '05 #2

P: n/a

The Best Of .The NET 1.x Years
http://odetocode.com/Blogs/scott/arc...3/20/1108.aspx

The Worst of the .NET 1.x Years
http://odetocode.com/Blogs/scott/arc...3/22/1118.aspx

Cheers,

--
Scott
http://www.OdeToCode.com/blogs/scott/

On Tue, 2 Aug 2005 18:38:07 +0100, "aron t" <mi*********@yahoo.co.uk>
wrote:
Hi,
I am good php programmer and want to learn asp.net.
Can someone tell me what are the best and the worst features of ASP.NET?
thanks


Nov 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
"aron t" <mi*********@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:u8**************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Hi,
I am good php programmer and want to learn asp.net.
Can someone tell me what are the best and the worst features of ASP.NET?


First off, I've only done a bit of PHP in 2001 and wasn't impressed at all.
Even when I got what I expected was a good IDE (ZEND), I really wasn't
happy.

IMHO, asp.net is light years ahead of PHP.

I believe asp.net is better because :
1. MS has always had fantastic IDEs, and VS.NET is definitely no exception.
2. It's a compilable language. Among other things; syntax and dependency
problems are discovered at compile time .. you won't find an error on some
obscure execution path after you release it.
3. Unit testing suites are available.
4. The code library is better.
5. It's object oriented. I have seen something about PHP objects ... to be
fair I don't know what they are, but I suspect it's a misuse of the phrase
object oriented, the way VB6 and Oracle misuse it. ASP.NET allows you to
create a fantastic design.
6. Debugging actually works. (this may be due to my ignorance with PHP, but
I found it easier to just add the Echo() function).
7. Available documentation engines.
etc........etc........etc........etc........
What I don't like about asp.net :
1. If you are using a webhost, it's going to be alot more expensive. PHP
hosting /w MySQL is cheap as hell.
2. ASP.NET tools cost money. You can write .NET without VS.NET, but I would
buy the tools. Having said that, you can buy an MSDN subscription for only
about $4k and you have every tool you will ever need for MS development.
That is a fantastic deal.
3. IMHO, I believe, ASP.NET is going to force users to use IE. Since the
postback mechanism in ASP.NET is dependent on client side code, once ASP.NET
event type programming becomes prominent on the internet .. and it will. IE
will be able to set the standard for the DOM, users will not be able to user
thier browser with client side scripting turned off, and most business users
would never take the chance to use anything other than IE.

Anyway .. that's my 2 cents. And my conspiracy theory.

Let the flames begin.

John

Nov 19 '05 #4

P: n/a
The best features of ASP.net are the same features as the worst features:

1. ASP.Net is a fully-compiled, real-world programming technology with no
limits on what you can do with it.
2. ASP.Net is fully object-oriented.
3. ASP.Net is as secure as you want it to be.

These features are the best because they mean that the limitations of
ASP.Net are none whatsoever, other than the amount of time, knowledge, and
resources you have available to spend on creating your apps. These features
make ASP.Net as powerful as any programming technology available, if not
moreso.

They are the worst, because power entails responsibility, and a willingness
to learn. An F-17 fighter plane can do a heck of a lot more than a Cessna,
but is much harder to learn how to fly, and easier to kill yourself with.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
Everybody picks their nose,
But some people are better at hiding it.

"aron t" <mi*********@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:u8**************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Hi,
I am good php programmer and want to learn asp.net.
Can someone tell me what are the best and the worst features of ASP.NET?
thanks

Nov 19 '05 #5

P: n/a
As a PHP developer you may want to look here:

http://www.php-compiler.net/

"aron t" <mi*********@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:u8**************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Hi,
I am good php programmer and want to learn asp.net.
Can someone tell me what are the best and the worst features of ASP.NET?
thanks

Nov 19 '05 #6

P: n/a
In article <u8**************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl>, mi*********@yahoo.co.uk
says...
Hi,
I am good php programmer and want to learn asp.net.
Can someone tell me what are the best and the worst features of ASP.NET?


I'm moving from PHP to ASP.NET. I don't ever want to see PHP code again.

ASP.NET advantage:

1. Compiled code, with compile-time type-checking. PHP 5 still hasn't
fixed this open hole in their object model.
2. Exception handling. You can trap problems, record the issues, maybe fix,
and present a reasonable error notification to the user, instead of
just having the page blow up and stop, as PHP does.
3. Code-behind model means that all your executable code is in a separate
file from your page "markup" (although most ASP.NET markup is <asp: ...>
tags rather than straight HTML).
4. Field validation. ASP.NET has almost everything you'd ever want for
validating user input, without requiring you to code anything. All
you need is a one-line check to see if everything on the page passed
validation, or not.
5. Better database integration. You can load a table and bind it to
things like displayable table format, or listbox/drop-down lists,
with only a few lines of code.
6. HUGE framework, with lots of available function. It takes only a
few minutes to connect a web service, for instance. Or to write one.
Collections in the framework (including data tables, list controls,
and more) are designed hand-in-hand with iterators in C# and VB.NET,
so it's very easy to work with lists and collections. (I've never
been impressed by PEAR: not enough there, back-level, poor documentation.
..NET is the framework you've wished you had.)
7. Outstanding debugging, including breakpoints, local variable
watch, single-stepping through code, break-on-exception, remote
debugging, trace controls that can be switched on and off without
recompiling, performance counters, and much more.
8. Visual Studio is a highly productive IDE, more than just drag-and-drop
for laying out controls, but also drag-and-drop database access,
context-sensitive help, fully integrated documentation of the entire
framework, code generation, and more. It's also your debugging
environment.
9. Much more: XML support, scalability, integrated session state
management, lots of stuff I'm not remembering off-hand.
10. And I can't emphasize this enough: integration. Everything is
very carefully thought out and planned so that it all works
together smoothly.

The only downsides are initial cost for tools, and the learning curve.
There is a fair amount to learn: ASP.NET is just the framework, and
page markup language. You write executable code in either C# or
Visual Basic (the languages are fully equivalent in all capabilities;
it's just a matter of preference for coding style). ADO.NET is
another part of the .NET framework that provides standardized access
to all databases. .NET is closely tied to the IIS web server. (You
can also install PHP and Perl under IIS, and use it for all your
local web development.) IIS and Apache don't co-exist well on one
machine, because they both need port 80.

I've found the Que certification books to be excellent training.
Get either the 70-305 exam book (ASP.NET and visual basic) or the
70-315 book (ASP.NET and C#). Either book will get you up and
running, including ADO.NET and SQL Server.

Contrary to what someone else said, cheap commercial hosting is
available. Look at myhosting.com as an example; $10 a month gets you
both .NET hosting and a linux/Apache host. Database hosting costs
extra, but it's not out of line.

Diane
Nov 19 '05 #7

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