By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
443,865 Members | 1,717 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 443,865 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

How to make downloadable source code available to website visitors?

P: n/a
Hello,

I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like website
visitors to be able to download code that I would like to make available to
them and that would be residing on my personal server.

Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so that I can
implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to convert
from C# if necessary.

Thanks
Nov 19 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
19 Replies


P: n/a
Here's a Freebie:

' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
Me.ShareKnowledge = False
Else
Me.ShareKnowledge = True
End If

' Non-Conditional
Me.NeedCode = False
Me.Educate()

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.
"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
Hello,

I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like website
visitors to be able to download code that I would like to make available
to
them and that would be residing on my personal server.

Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so that I
can
implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to convert
from C# if necessary.

Thanks

Nov 19 '05 #2

P: n/a
Kevin,

I really didn't want to take what you said the wrong way, so I did a search
on your name relative to your other posts within this newsgroup. It seems
that you have some pet peeves, including people asking for sample code.

I fully respect your right not to aid or assist someone who is asking for
help.

It is not unusual for highly experienced programmers to purchase books or
seek advice on programming in a language that is new to them. Everyone does
not feel the need to reinvent the wheel, especially if the wheel is
something that is used as a utility of sorts. Most of the time, that piece
of code is a small part of the overall code base but may be a necessary
piece of the puzzle.

Am I misunderstanding the spirit of your posts and your reply? Do you think
that one should reinvent everything themselves? Do you think that there is
shame in seeking a code example for something specific that they want to do,
especially when that specific something is done over and over and is used by
many people?
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Here's a Freebie:

' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
Me.ShareKnowledge = False
Else
Me.ShareKnowledge = True
End If

' Non-Conditional
Me.NeedCode = False
Me.Educate()

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.
"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
Hello,

I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like website
visitors to be able to download code that I would like to make available
to
them and that would be residing on my personal server.

Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so that I
can
implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to convert
from C# if necessary.

Thanks


Nov 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
My point is this: How can you share what you know if you expect other people
to provide it for you? That's putting the cart before the horse.

Programming is a discipline, and requires a lot of hard work to master. I
explain in detail (quite a bit of detail from time to time) how the
technology works, and answer many questions (many a day, in fact). I don't
believe writing code for people helps them in any way. In fact, it is
harmful to them, as it allows them to get themselves into even greater
trouble than they find themselves in at first, as they get the impression
that they don't have to understand programming in order to do it.

In other words, I'm not here to promote myself and my programming skills, by
showing off my code solutions to the world. I don't need to. I can get work
as a programmer anywhere, because I've worked hard, and continue learning
every day, as I have for over 10 years now. My mother taught me to be
responsible for myself. That said, every programmer, including myself, needs
help from time to time. But they don't need someone to spoon feed them. They
NEED to be shown how to feed themselves. When I ask for help, that's all I
ask, and I'm grateful for any clues that someone can provide. I don't want
to be spoon fed. That makes you fat and lazy. I want to be shown the way to
feed myself. That makes you strong. And I believe that I should help people
become strong, not fat and lazy.

When I was a child, I was taken care of. But my parents are gone now, and I
find myself without a care-giver. I have to stand on my own, as do we all at
one time or another. My mother taught me how to do that, and I will always
be grateful to her. She knew she wouldn't be there to take care of me
forever. In other words, who parents the parents? The best a parent can do
for their offspring is to teach them to fend for themselves. And I want to
be a good "parent," now that I am one.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:xR*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
Kevin,

I really didn't want to take what you said the wrong way, so I did a
search
on your name relative to your other posts within this newsgroup. It seems
that you have some pet peeves, including people asking for sample code.

I fully respect your right not to aid or assist someone who is asking for
help.

It is not unusual for highly experienced programmers to purchase books or
seek advice on programming in a language that is new to them. Everyone
does
not feel the need to reinvent the wheel, especially if the wheel is
something that is used as a utility of sorts. Most of the time, that
piece
of code is a small part of the overall code base but may be a necessary
piece of the puzzle.

Am I misunderstanding the spirit of your posts and your reply? Do you
think
that one should reinvent everything themselves? Do you think that there
is
shame in seeking a code example for something specific that they want to
do,
especially when that specific something is done over and over and is used
by
many people?
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Here's a Freebie:

' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
Me.ShareKnowledge = False
Else
Me.ShareKnowledge = True
End If

' Non-Conditional
Me.NeedCode = False
Me.Educate()

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.
"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
> Hello,
>
> I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like website
> visitors to be able to download code that I would like to make
> available
> to
> them and that would be residing on my personal server.
>
> Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so that
> I
> can
> implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to
> convert
> from C# if necessary.
>
> Thanks
>
>



Nov 19 '05 #4

P: n/a
Happily, I solved the majority of my problem at about 6 a.m. I still have
some fine tuning to do, but I am experimenting right now. I will post the
results when I am done.

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#c**************@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
My point is this: How can you share what you know if you expect other people to provide it for you? That's putting the cart before the horse.
That statement makes no sense. How can I share something that I knew very
little about at the time? Why would I ask about something that I know
little about?

And you also assume that I never share what it is that I do know. I have
found a
lot of tips on how to perform certain functions as a result of reading,
studying, practicing, and sometimes going to various newsgroups. I have
also come across questions from other people that I have had answers for and
I
willingly posted responses to those in need. Was it on this newsgroup? No
it
wasn't, but it was in the Microsoft programming realm involving both managed
and unmanaged code, VB6 and VB.NET.
Programming is a discipline, and requires a lot of hard work to master. I
explain in detail (quite a bit of detail from time to time) how the
technology works, and answer many questions (many a day, in fact). I don't
believe writing code for people helps them in any way. In fact, it is
harmful to them, as it allows them to get themselves into even greater
trouble than they find themselves in at first, as they get the impression
that they don't have to understand programming in order to do it.

I don't know how you became an MVP, but it would be hard for you to convince
a sane person that you went through every single namespace in .NET without
using code
examples that Microsoft provided. Why would Microsoft provide them in the
documentation if they expected each programmer to figure it all out by
themselves? How would an employer get any work out of his people if he
expected them to reinvent the wheel each time? If you used other peoples
books and their examples in order to get certified and if you have gone
through the MS documentation that comes with Visual Studio, then you would
see for yourself that they tend to take their examples from the Microsoft
documentation. So if you say that you have never used a code sample, AND
that
you are Microsoft certified, AND that you make a living as a software
developer, then you are lying through your teeth.

Maybe you are smarter than everyone else, but not even people I know who
have graduated with Master Degrees from Georgia Tech, Berkeley, Stanford and
MIT in Engineering and Computer Science are so arrogant as think that code
samples are above them. They will
use them to get a jump start and then broaden and deeper their
understanding. I went to a private smaller university, but I have no
problem doing the same.

Of course, the danger of code samples is that a person will not take the
time to understand what it is they are doing and how it fits into the
context of the programming environment, and in the case of .NET, how the
namespaces work. But someone who does that will not last long as a
programmer. We all know that!

The whole purpose of code samples is to get a person on the right track and
to give them an opportunity to delve deeper into context of the development
environment that he or she is working in.

And it is quite presumptuous of you to assume that I would not care to
deepen my understanding once I got some hints or guidance.
In other words, I'm not here to promote myself and my programming skills,
by showing off my code solutions to the world. I don't need to. I can get work as a programmer anywhere, because I've worked hard, and continue learning
every day, as I have for over 10 years now. My mother taught me to be
responsible for myself. That said, every programmer, including myself, needs help from time to time. But they don't need someone to spoon feed them. They NEED to be shown how to feed themselves. When I ask for help, that's all I
ask, and I'm grateful for any clues that someone can provide. I don't want
to be spoon fed. That makes you fat and lazy. I want to be shown the way to feed myself. That makes you strong. And I believe that I should help people become strong, not fat and lazy.
Yes, you are here to promote yourself. You have not hesitated to make a
point of how well you were trained by your mother, how hard you have worked
and how responsible you are for yourself. It is obvious how much contempt
you have for people who ask for help (obviously, they are asking for a spoon
feeding). And God help them if they make a typographical error or
grammatical error.

I did not ask someone to build a webpage or a website for me. I asked for a
code sample that was to be a small part of the overall picture. Are you
saying that is wrong and lazy?

When I was a child, I was taken care of. But my parents are gone now, and I find myself without a care-giver. I have to stand on my own, as do we all at one time or another. My mother taught me how to do that, and I will always
be grateful to her. She knew she wouldn't be there to take care of me
forever. In other words, who parents the parents? The best a parent can do
for their offspring is to teach them to fend for themselves. And I want to
be a good "parent," now that I am one.
Your lecture on hard work, discipline, and home training were again
presumptuous and unnecessary, except for the children who sprung forth from
your loins. But maybe they are just as perfect as you, and need no such
lectures.

I didn't call you out by name for help.

If such a request was beneath you, the tasteful thing for you have do was to
quietly
ignore it.

Really, Kevin, who do you think you are? Do you think that you are above
reproach? If so, had you run a simple MS Word spell check, or better yet,
remembered your elementary school grammar, you could have avoided the misuse
of commas at least one of your sentences. No, I don't tend to pick on the
misuse of spelling or grammar by others, but given that you listed it as one
of your pet peeves, I would have thought that you were above it all.
Obviously, you are not.

--
HTH,

This should have been HRH (His Royal Highness), which would go along very
nicely with your Princess.

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:xR*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
Kevin,

I really didn't want to take what you said the wrong way, so I did a
search
on your name relative to your other posts within this newsgroup. It seems that you have some pet peeves, including people asking for sample code.

I fully respect your right not to aid or assist someone who is asking for help.

It is not unusual for highly experienced programmers to purchase books or seek advice on programming in a language that is new to them. Everyone
does
not feel the need to reinvent the wheel, especially if the wheel is
something that is used as a utility of sorts. Most of the time, that
piece
of code is a small part of the overall code base but may be a necessary
piece of the puzzle.

Am I misunderstanding the spirit of your posts and your reply? Do you
think
that one should reinvent everything themselves? Do you think that there is
shame in seeking a code example for something specific that they want to
do,
especially when that specific something is done over and over and is used by
many people?
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Here's a Freebie:

' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
Me.ShareKnowledge = False
Else
Me.ShareKnowledge = True
End If

' Non-Conditional
Me.NeedCode = False
Me.Educate()

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.
"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
> Hello,
>
> I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like website
> visitors to be able to download code that I would like to make
> available
> to
> them and that would be residing on my personal server.
>
> Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so that > I
> can
> implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to
> convert
> from C# if necessary.
>
> Thanks
>
>





Nov 19 '05 #5

P: n/a
Kevin,

You have a lot of nerve to be so condescending. Before you write little
snide code snippets, you need to clean up around your own front door. Or
better yet, clean up your own books and code. Especially when anyone can go
to Amazon.com and see the reviews of your books.

Especially after you helped write one book with that squeaked out a 3 star
rating after you bolstered it with your own 5 star rating. Especially when
you helped to write another that bombed outright. Especially when and you
are the only common denominator between the two.

Especially when the complaints were that the code for BOTH books was riddled
with errors. One review said that 80% of the code was incorrect in the
Beginning SQL Programming book was incorrect.
Beginning SQL Programming (Programmer to Programmer)
by John Kauffman, Brian Matsik, Kevin Spencer, Ian Herbert, Sakhr Youness,
Julian Skinner
3 Star rating based on 11 reviews - pumped up with your own glowing "review"
of your work.

"Overpriced for meager information", July 27, 2001

"Rubbish", November 22, 2002

"Absolutely Appalling!!!", October 18, 2002
Reviewer: MR M J O'Sullivan "gameshaven" (London) - See all my reviews
"This has got to be the worst book on any computing subject ever published.
The try it out sections and code snippets throughout the book are about 80%
incorrect, honestly the level of errors and poor coding is disgraceful. Wrox
books are normally of a very high quality but this one is absolutely
terrible, I can't emphasised that enough. I begun this book with high
enthusiasm for this subject but now my enthusiasm has totally diminished.
Apart from the appalling level of errors there is also a high level or
repetition, which can only be down to poor communication among its authors.
Then in other areas you'll find exceptional weak explanations or
explanations lacking altogether."

"Typos, inconsistent examples, sidetracked, advocate for Micr," August 16,
2001

Here you are, Kevin, gushing your opinion of your book and trying like hell
to get that perfect 5 star rating:

Beginning to End SQL Programming, April 11, 2001
Reviewer: Kevin Spencer (Pell City, AL USA) - See all my reviews
I am one of the authors of this book, so of course my rating is going to be
a little prejudiced. However, I must say that I'm very proud of this work,
and after reading the complete work, I thought it should be called
"Beginning to End SQL Programming." There isn't a single aspect of SQL that
is not covered in this book. While it is designed to cover using SQL from
the beginning, and written in a style that is easy for novices to
understand, it covers more about the actual use of SQL than any other SQL
book that I've seen. I actually use it as a reference myself!

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...117079903/sr=1
-2/ref=sr_1_2/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

-----------------------------------
Beginning Mac Programming
by Jeff Thompson, Kevin Spencer
1 Star rating - 1 reviewer. Come on Kevin, why didn't you give yourself a 5
star rating on this one. Too embarrassed?
Comment:
"poor tutorial, but good overview of cocoa and carbon", February 24, 2002
"...Magic code appears in the project without ever being introduced in the
tutorial. There are multiple errors in the tutorial as well. I guess it is
good practice to be able to debug on your own."

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...117079903/sr=1
-3/ref=sr_1_3/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

---------------------
All of this and you have the nerve to bleat about on about the grammatical
and spelling errors that posters make and how so many programmers are dumb
and lazy.

You are a genius in your own mind only. No true genius would be satisfied
with mediocrity.


"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Here's a Freebie:

' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
Me.ShareKnowledge = False
Else
Me.ShareKnowledge = True
End If

' Non-Conditional
Me.NeedCode = False
Me.Educate()

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.
"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
Hello,

I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like website
visitors to be able to download code that I would like to make available
to
them and that would be residing on my personal server.

Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so that I
can
implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to convert
from C# if necessary.

Thanks


Nov 19 '05 #6

P: n/a
Lee

Pwnd :)

Hopefully he learns his lesson.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in
news:QT****************@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com :
Kevin,

You have a lot of nerve to be so condescending. Before you write
little snide code snippets, you need to clean up around your own front
door. Or better yet, clean up your own books and code. Especially
when anyone can go to Amazon.com and see the reviews of your books.

Especially after you helped write one book with that squeaked out a 3
star rating after you bolstered it with your own 5 star rating.
Especially when you helped to write another that bombed outright.
Especially when and you are the only common denominator between the
two.

Especially when the complaints were that the code for BOTH books was
riddled with errors. One review said that 80% of the code was
incorrect in the Beginning SQL Programming book was incorrect.
Beginning SQL Programming (Programmer to Programmer)
by John Kauffman, Brian Matsik, Kevin Spencer, Ian Herbert, Sakhr
Youness, Julian Skinner
3 Star rating based on 11 reviews - pumped up with your own glowing
"review" of your work.

"Overpriced for meager information", July 27, 2001

"Rubbish", November 22, 2002

"Absolutely Appalling!!!", October 18, 2002
Reviewer: MR M J O'Sullivan "gameshaven" (London) - See all my
reviews
"This has got to be the worst book on any computing subject ever
published. The try it out sections and code snippets throughout the
book are about 80% incorrect, honestly the level of errors and poor
coding is disgraceful. Wrox books are normally of a very high quality
but this one is absolutely terrible, I can't emphasised that enough. I
begun this book with high enthusiasm for this subject but now my
enthusiasm has totally diminished. Apart from the appalling level of
errors there is also a high level or repetition, which can only be
down to poor communication among its authors. Then in other areas
you'll find exceptional weak explanations or explanations lacking
altogether."

"Typos, inconsistent examples, sidetracked, advocate for Micr," August
16, 2001

Here you are, Kevin, gushing your opinion of your book and trying like
hell to get that perfect 5 star rating:

Beginning to End SQL Programming, April 11, 2001
Reviewer: Kevin Spencer (Pell City, AL USA) - See all my reviews
I am one of the authors of this book, so of course my rating is going
to be a little prejudiced. However, I must say that I'm very proud of
this work, and after reading the complete work, I thought it should be
called "Beginning to End SQL Programming." There isn't a single aspect
of SQL that is not covered in this book. While it is designed to cover
using SQL from the beginning, and written in a style that is easy for
novices to understand, it covers more about the actual use of SQL than
any other SQL book that I've seen. I actually use it as a reference
myself!

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...qid=1117079903
/sr=1 -2/ref=sr_1_2/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

-----------------------------------
Beginning Mac Programming
by Jeff Thompson, Kevin Spencer
1 Star rating - 1 reviewer. Come on Kevin, why didn't you give
yourself a 5 star rating on this one. Too embarrassed?
Comment:
"poor tutorial, but good overview of cocoa and carbon", February 24,
2002 "...Magic code appears in the project without ever being
introduced in the tutorial. There are multiple errors in the tutorial
as well. I guess it is good practice to be able to debug on your own."

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...qid=1117079903
/sr=1 -3/ref=sr_1_3/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

---------------------
All of this and you have the nerve to bleat about on about the
grammatical and spelling errors that posters make and how so many
programmers are dumb and lazy.

You are a genius in your own mind only. No true genius would be
satisfied with mediocrity.


"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Here's a Freebie:

' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
Me.ShareKnowledge = False
Else
Me.ShareKnowledge = True
End If

' Non-Conditional
Me.NeedCode = False
Me.Educate()

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.
"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
> Hello,
>
> I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like
> website visitors to be able to download code that I would like to
> make available to
> them and that would be residing on my personal server.
>
> Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so
> that I can
> implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to
> convert from C# if necessary.
>
> Thanks
>
>




Nov 19 '05 #7

P: n/a
Thank you for your attempt at belittling me. Every attack is an opportunity
to grow, sensai. However, it should be noted that:

1. I was not the primary author of any of those books. I contributed several
chapters in each. The primary author was John Kauffman, who you should be
insulting for the opinions you read, I suppose.

2. You haven't actually READ any of the books, but are simply quoting the
opinions of others in a rather lame attempt to belittle me. I must
compliment your ability to research, but you need to direct it towards that
which is useful.

3. Opinions are like a**holes. Not only does everybody have one, but they
all stink. Only a dog would find one interesting.

4. I was attempting to help you. I speak from experience. You speak from
bitterness. Perhaps you might like to check out my web site, which is full
of code, all of which I wrote myself. It also contains articles, tutorials,
and quite a bit of other free material regardin ASP, ASP.Net and programming
in general, all of which I wrote myself..

5. You misunderstood my attempt to make a point with a bit of humor. I was
not implying that you are ignorant, although I'm beginning to think that may
be the case. I was making several points. One cannot teach what one does not
know. Regardless of whether one has knowledge or not, one does not need code
written by other people (which is likely to be unreliable, as is one's own,
unless checked extremely carefully), and one needs to continually educate
one's self. All of these points apply to myself as well as everyone else.

In conclusion, you have not made me look bad, as hard as you have tried. You
have made yourself look like a petty child, and proven my point in the
process. Programming is a discipline that requires a relentless logic. First
learn discipline. Develop an anal-retentive habit of criticism, especially
of yourself. Trust no one, and no code, especially your own. Second, learn
and apply logic with discipline. Third, learn programming. Last, teach
others as others have taught you. And always continue to learn.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:QT****************@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com ...
Kevin,

You have a lot of nerve to be so condescending. Before you write little
snide code snippets, you need to clean up around your own front door. Or
better yet, clean up your own books and code. Especially when anyone can
go
to Amazon.com and see the reviews of your books.

Especially after you helped write one book with that squeaked out a 3 star
rating after you bolstered it with your own 5 star rating. Especially when
you helped to write another that bombed outright. Especially when and you
are the only common denominator between the two.

Especially when the complaints were that the code for BOTH books was
riddled
with errors. One review said that 80% of the code was incorrect in the
Beginning SQL Programming book was incorrect.
Beginning SQL Programming (Programmer to Programmer)
by John Kauffman, Brian Matsik, Kevin Spencer, Ian Herbert, Sakhr Youness,
Julian Skinner
3 Star rating based on 11 reviews - pumped up with your own glowing
"review"
of your work.

"Overpriced for meager information", July 27, 2001

"Rubbish", November 22, 2002

"Absolutely Appalling!!!", October 18, 2002
Reviewer: MR M J O'Sullivan "gameshaven" (London) - See all my
reviews
"This has got to be the worst book on any computing subject ever
published.
The try it out sections and code snippets throughout the book are about
80%
incorrect, honestly the level of errors and poor coding is disgraceful.
Wrox
books are normally of a very high quality but this one is absolutely
terrible, I can't emphasised that enough. I begun this book with high
enthusiasm for this subject but now my enthusiasm has totally diminished.
Apart from the appalling level of errors there is also a high level or
repetition, which can only be down to poor communication among its
authors.
Then in other areas you'll find exceptional weak explanations or
explanations lacking altogether."

"Typos, inconsistent examples, sidetracked, advocate for Micr," August 16,
2001

Here you are, Kevin, gushing your opinion of your book and trying like
hell
to get that perfect 5 star rating:

Beginning to End SQL Programming, April 11, 2001
Reviewer: Kevin Spencer (Pell City, AL USA) - See all my reviews
I am one of the authors of this book, so of course my rating is going to
be
a little prejudiced. However, I must say that I'm very proud of this work,
and after reading the complete work, I thought it should be called
"Beginning to End SQL Programming." There isn't a single aspect of SQL
that
is not covered in this book. While it is designed to cover using SQL from
the beginning, and written in a style that is easy for novices to
understand, it covers more about the actual use of SQL than any other SQL
book that I've seen. I actually use it as a reference myself!

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...117079903/sr=1
-2/ref=sr_1_2/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

-----------------------------------
Beginning Mac Programming
by Jeff Thompson, Kevin Spencer
1 Star rating - 1 reviewer. Come on Kevin, why didn't you give yourself a
5
star rating on this one. Too embarrassed?
Comment:
"poor tutorial, but good overview of cocoa and carbon", February 24, 2002
"...Magic code appears in the project without ever being introduced in the
tutorial. There are multiple errors in the tutorial as well. I guess it is
good practice to be able to debug on your own."

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...117079903/sr=1
-3/ref=sr_1_3/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

---------------------
All of this and you have the nerve to bleat about on about the grammatical
and spelling errors that posters make and how so many programmers are dumb
and lazy.

You are a genius in your own mind only. No true genius would be satisfied
with mediocrity.


"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Here's a Freebie:

' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
Me.ShareKnowledge = False
Else
Me.ShareKnowledge = True
End If

' Non-Conditional
Me.NeedCode = False
Me.Educate()

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.
"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
> Hello,
>
> I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like website
> visitors to be able to download code that I would like to make
> available
> to
> them and that would be residing on my personal server.
>
> Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so that
> I
> can
> implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to
> convert
> from C# if necessary.
>
> Thanks
>
>



Nov 19 '05 #8

P: n/a
> Pwnd :)

Hopefully he learns his lesson.
I learn every day, especially from my enemies. If a doctor doesn't take the
medicine he prescribes, how good is he?

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Lee" <no***************@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@195.129. 110.130...
Pwnd :)

Hopefully he learns his lesson.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in
news:QT****************@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com :
Kevin,

You have a lot of nerve to be so condescending. Before you write
little snide code snippets, you need to clean up around your own front
door. Or better yet, clean up your own books and code. Especially
when anyone can go to Amazon.com and see the reviews of your books.

Especially after you helped write one book with that squeaked out a 3
star rating after you bolstered it with your own 5 star rating.
Especially when you helped to write another that bombed outright.
Especially when and you are the only common denominator between the
two.

Especially when the complaints were that the code for BOTH books was
riddled with errors. One review said that 80% of the code was
incorrect in the Beginning SQL Programming book was incorrect.
Beginning SQL Programming (Programmer to Programmer)
by John Kauffman, Brian Matsik, Kevin Spencer, Ian Herbert, Sakhr
Youness, Julian Skinner
3 Star rating based on 11 reviews - pumped up with your own glowing
"review" of your work.

"Overpriced for meager information", July 27, 2001

"Rubbish", November 22, 2002

"Absolutely Appalling!!!", October 18, 2002
Reviewer: MR M J O'Sullivan "gameshaven" (London) - See all my
reviews
"This has got to be the worst book on any computing subject ever
published. The try it out sections and code snippets throughout the
book are about 80% incorrect, honestly the level of errors and poor
coding is disgraceful. Wrox books are normally of a very high quality
but this one is absolutely terrible, I can't emphasised that enough. I
begun this book with high enthusiasm for this subject but now my
enthusiasm has totally diminished. Apart from the appalling level of
errors there is also a high level or repetition, which can only be
down to poor communication among its authors. Then in other areas
you'll find exceptional weak explanations or explanations lacking
altogether."

"Typos, inconsistent examples, sidetracked, advocate for Micr," August
16, 2001

Here you are, Kevin, gushing your opinion of your book and trying like
hell to get that perfect 5 star rating:

Beginning to End SQL Programming, April 11, 2001
Reviewer: Kevin Spencer (Pell City, AL USA) - See all my reviews
I am one of the authors of this book, so of course my rating is going
to be a little prejudiced. However, I must say that I'm very proud of
this work, and after reading the complete work, I thought it should be
called "Beginning to End SQL Programming." There isn't a single aspect
of SQL that is not covered in this book. While it is designed to cover
using SQL from the beginning, and written in a style that is easy for
novices to understand, it covers more about the actual use of SQL than
any other SQL book that I've seen. I actually use it as a reference
myself!

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...qid=1117079903
/sr=1 -2/ref=sr_1_2/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

-----------------------------------
Beginning Mac Programming
by Jeff Thompson, Kevin Spencer
1 Star rating - 1 reviewer. Come on Kevin, why didn't you give
yourself a 5 star rating on this one. Too embarrassed?
Comment:
"poor tutorial, but good overview of cocoa and carbon", February 24,
2002 "...Magic code appears in the project without ever being
introduced in the tutorial. There are multiple errors in the tutorial
as well. I guess it is good practice to be able to debug on your own."

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...qid=1117079903
/sr=1 -3/ref=sr_1_3/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

---------------------
All of this and you have the nerve to bleat about on about the
grammatical and spelling errors that posters make and how so many
programmers are dumb and lazy.

You are a genius in your own mind only. No true genius would be
satisfied with mediocrity.


"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Here's a Freebie:

' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
Me.ShareKnowledge = False
Else
Me.ShareKnowledge = True
End If

' Non-Conditional
Me.NeedCode = False
Me.Educate()

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.
"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
> Hello,
>
> I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like
> website visitors to be able to download code that I would like to
> make available to
> them and that would be residing on my personal server.
>
> Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so
> that I can
> implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to
> convert from C# if necessary.
>
> Thanks
>
>


Nov 19 '05 #9

P: n/a
BTW, one of the books you mentioned was apparently co-authored by a
DIFFERENT "Kevin Spencer." I have never used a Mac, nor written about it.
I'm sure he will appreciate your criticism based upon the opinions of others
as well, if he reads this newsgroup. Good thing my name isn't "John Smith!"

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:%2***************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Thank you for your attempt at belittling me. Every attack is an
opportunity to grow, sensai. However, it should be noted that:

1. I was not the primary author of any of those books. I contributed
several chapters in each. The primary author was John Kauffman, who you
should be insulting for the opinions you read, I suppose.

2. You haven't actually READ any of the books, but are simply quoting the
opinions of others in a rather lame attempt to belittle me. I must
compliment your ability to research, but you need to direct it towards
that which is useful.

3. Opinions are like a**holes. Not only does everybody have one, but they
all stink. Only a dog would find one interesting.

4. I was attempting to help you. I speak from experience. You speak from
bitterness. Perhaps you might like to check out my web site, which is full
of code, all of which I wrote myself. It also contains articles,
tutorials, and quite a bit of other free material regardin ASP, ASP.Net
and programming in general, all of which I wrote myself..

5. You misunderstood my attempt to make a point with a bit of humor. I was
not implying that you are ignorant, although I'm beginning to think that
may be the case. I was making several points. One cannot teach what one
does not know. Regardless of whether one has knowledge or not, one does
not need code written by other people (which is likely to be unreliable,
as is one's own, unless checked extremely carefully), and one needs to
continually educate one's self. All of these points apply to myself as
well as everyone else.

In conclusion, you have not made me look bad, as hard as you have tried.
You have made yourself look like a petty child, and proven my point in the
process. Programming is a discipline that requires a relentless logic.
First learn discipline. Develop an anal-retentive habit of criticism,
especially of yourself. Trust no one, and no code, especially your own.
Second, learn and apply logic with discipline. Third, learn programming.
Last, teach others as others have taught you. And always continue to
learn.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:QT****************@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com ...
Kevin,

You have a lot of nerve to be so condescending. Before you write little
snide code snippets, you need to clean up around your own front door. Or
better yet, clean up your own books and code. Especially when anyone can
go
to Amazon.com and see the reviews of your books.

Especially after you helped write one book with that squeaked out a 3
star
rating after you bolstered it with your own 5 star rating. Especially
when
you helped to write another that bombed outright. Especially when and you
are the only common denominator between the two.

Especially when the complaints were that the code for BOTH books was
riddled
with errors. One review said that 80% of the code was incorrect in the
Beginning SQL Programming book was incorrect.
Beginning SQL Programming (Programmer to Programmer)
by John Kauffman, Brian Matsik, Kevin Spencer, Ian Herbert, Sakhr
Youness,
Julian Skinner
3 Star rating based on 11 reviews - pumped up with your own glowing
"review"
of your work.

"Overpriced for meager information", July 27, 2001

"Rubbish", November 22, 2002

"Absolutely Appalling!!!", October 18, 2002
Reviewer: MR M J O'Sullivan "gameshaven" (London) - See all my
reviews
"This has got to be the worst book on any computing subject ever
published.
The try it out sections and code snippets throughout the book are about
80%
incorrect, honestly the level of errors and poor coding is disgraceful.
Wrox
books are normally of a very high quality but this one is absolutely
terrible, I can't emphasised that enough. I begun this book with high
enthusiasm for this subject but now my enthusiasm has totally diminished.
Apart from the appalling level of errors there is also a high level or
repetition, which can only be down to poor communication among its
authors.
Then in other areas you'll find exceptional weak explanations or
explanations lacking altogether."

"Typos, inconsistent examples, sidetracked, advocate for Micr," August
16,
2001

Here you are, Kevin, gushing your opinion of your book and trying like
hell
to get that perfect 5 star rating:

Beginning to End SQL Programming, April 11, 2001
Reviewer: Kevin Spencer (Pell City, AL USA) - See all my reviews
I am one of the authors of this book, so of course my rating is going to
be
a little prejudiced. However, I must say that I'm very proud of this
work,
and after reading the complete work, I thought it should be called
"Beginning to End SQL Programming." There isn't a single aspect of SQL
that
is not covered in this book. While it is designed to cover using SQL from
the beginning, and written in a style that is easy for novices to
understand, it covers more about the actual use of SQL than any other SQL
book that I've seen. I actually use it as a reference myself!

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...117079903/sr=1
-2/ref=sr_1_2/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

-----------------------------------
Beginning Mac Programming
by Jeff Thompson, Kevin Spencer
1 Star rating - 1 reviewer. Come on Kevin, why didn't you give yourself
a 5
star rating on this one. Too embarrassed?
Comment:
"poor tutorial, but good overview of cocoa and carbon", February 24, 2002
"...Magic code appears in the project without ever being introduced in
the
tutorial. There are multiple errors in the tutorial as well. I guess it
is
good practice to be able to debug on your own."

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...117079903/sr=1
-3/ref=sr_1_3/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

---------------------
All of this and you have the nerve to bleat about on about the
grammatical
and spelling errors that posters make and how so many programmers are
dumb
and lazy.

You are a genius in your own mind only. No true genius would be
satisfied
with mediocrity.


"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Here's a Freebie:

' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
Me.ShareKnowledge = False
Else
Me.ShareKnowledge = True
End If

' Non-Conditional
Me.NeedCode = False
Me.Educate()

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.
"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
> Hello,
>
> I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like website
> visitors to be able to download code that I would like to make
> available
> to
> them and that would be residing on my personal server.
>
> Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so that
> I
> can
> implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to
> convert
> from C# if necessary.
>
> Thanks
>
>



Nov 19 '05 #10

P: n/a

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#w*************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Thank you for your attempt at belittling me. Every attack is an opportunity to grow, sensai. However, it should be noted that:

Normally, I would never have posted such statements. I much prefer to seek
common ground. I have used newsgroups, especially technical ones back when
there was no graphical interface on the Internet, and I have never seen any
posts that matched yours in response to someone seeking help.

However, you took the time and made a great effort to be snide and
insulting. So I just had to know more about you. And I found out that you
were human after all. Real human. Those who live in glass houses should
throw no stones.

If you learn anything from this exchange, I would hope that it would be that
you are not so much above the fray as you might think. I hope that you
might gain some humility and do away with your need and desire to insult
people. I hope that you may see that the contempt that you have shown
regarding your perceived shortcomings in others can be directed right back
at you. I hope that you feel the need to direct your judgement more towards
yourself and less towards others.

I have no contempt for you, personally. However, I have no problem holding
up the mirror that was your judgement and to place it squarely in your face.
1. I was not the primary author of any of those books. I contributed several chapters in each. The primary author was John Kauffman, who you should be
insulting for the opinions you read, I suppose.

You failed the test which was to take your own advice regarding
responsibility. And taking true responsibility means never blaming others.
You went on and on about what your mother taught you, but you did not learn
your lesson well.

Here's a heads up. When you put your name on a paper, manuscript or book,
ESPECIALLY when it is published, you don't have the luxury of palming its
failures or shortcomings off on the other authors.

Cowboy up, dude!
2. You haven't actually READ any of the books, but are simply quoting the
opinions of others in a rather lame attempt to belittle me. I must
compliment your ability to research, but you need to direct it towards that which is useful.
Are you kidding? Why would I buy a book that had such consistently horrible
reviews? They didn't just say that the book sucked. They went into painful
detail regarding coding errors.

The review of your book was among the more scathing that I have seen
relative to a techncial book, and I've looked up many technical book
review.

3. Opinions are like a**holes. Not only does everybody have one, but they
all stink. Only a dog would find one interesting.
So why did you put your stinking two cents worth in the first place? Do you
think that you are Jesus, the only man with the right to cast the first
stone?
4. I was attempting to help you. I speak from experience. You speak from
bitterness.
You hit someone over the head with a frying pan and then say that you were
trying to kill a mosquito? Try again.

I harbor no bitterness towards you. I can't be tempted or bribed into it.
Why should I when you have shown yourself to be unworthy of your own advice?
Perhaps you might like to check out my web site, which is full
of code, all of which I wrote myself. It also contains articles, tutorials, and quite a bit of other free material regardin ASP, ASP.Net and programming in general, all of which I wrote myself..

We know, we know. You would NEVER look at any code in the Microsoft .NET
namespaces. You would never, ever use it to jumpstart yourself. And I just
can't figure out why Bill Gates would ever allow any code samples in .NET
help in the first place? We lazy morons should be able to figure out how to
write the code from scratch, from the namespace class descriptions alone!
5. You misunderstood my attempt to make a point with a bit of humor.
I misunderstood nothing. Try again. Before my last two posts, I checked
with you to see if I was misunderstanding you. In a subsequent post, you
made it clear to me that I wasn't and proceeded to give me a lecture on work
ethic, your mother, etc.

And I am quite sure that you found humor in what you said. Statements are
always funny to the guy who is dishing out contempt and insults.
I was
not implying that you are ignorant, although I'm beginning to think that may be the case. I was making several points.
There is nothing wrong with igonrance. Ignorance can be cured with
knowledge. And I am on the road to curing my ignorance on the specific
problem that I was trying to solve in ASP.NET

Stupidity is a totally different matter and is incurable without a change of
mind and heart.

And for someone who takes the time to point out the real or perceived
shortcomings of others especially when the accuser himself has obvious and
glaring ones of his or her own , that is, well, you figure it out.
One cannot teach what one does not
know. Regardless of whether one has knowledge or not, one does not need code written by other people (which is likely to be unreliable, as is one's own, unless checked extremely carefully), and one needs to continually educate
one's self. All of these points apply to myself as well as everyone else.

There you go assuming again. You assume that I am not taking it upon myself
to go through the related namespaces and to really understand it. You
assume that all programmers who ask for help won't do that. You are wrong.
But of course, if you hold on to the belief that every software developer
who learns from sample code would never take it upon themselves to
understand it or even make it better, then you get to maintain your false
sense of superiority.
In conclusion, you have not made me look bad, as hard as you have tried. You have made yourself look like a petty child, and proven my point in the
process.
No, Kevin, you've besmirched your own credibility because your words do not
match your actions in a published manuscript. You made it real easy.

Programming is a discipline that requires a relentless logic. First learn discipline. Develop an anal-retentive habit of criticism, especially
of yourself.
Although what you say is true here, you make yourself look really bad by
stating that fact and having a book out there that got complaints about code
errors.
Trust no one, and no code, especially your own.
So maybe you saw it coming?

Second, learn and apply logic with discipline. Third, learn programming. Last, teach
others as others have taught you. And always continue to learn.

We can agree on this, and, believe it or not, I do this. Your lecture was
unnesseccary.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:QT****************@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com ...
Kevin,

You have a lot of nerve to be so condescending. Before you write little
snide code snippets, you need to clean up around your own front door. Or better yet, clean up your own books and code. Especially when anyone can go
to Amazon.com and see the reviews of your books.

Especially after you helped write one book with that squeaked out a 3 star rating after you bolstered it with your own 5 star rating. Especially when you helped to write another that bombed outright. Especially when and you are the only common denominator between the two.

Especially when the complaints were that the code for BOTH books was
riddled
with errors. One review said that 80% of the code was incorrect in the
Beginning SQL Programming book was incorrect.
Beginning SQL Programming (Programmer to Programmer)
by John Kauffman, Brian Matsik, Kevin Spencer, Ian Herbert, Sakhr Youness, Julian Skinner
3 Star rating based on 11 reviews - pumped up with your own glowing
"review"
of your work.

"Overpriced for meager information", July 27, 2001

"Rubbish", November 22, 2002

"Absolutely Appalling!!!", October 18, 2002
Reviewer: MR M J O'Sullivan "gameshaven" (London) - See all my
reviews
"This has got to be the worst book on any computing subject ever
published.
The try it out sections and code snippets throughout the book are about
80%
incorrect, honestly the level of errors and poor coding is disgraceful.
Wrox
books are normally of a very high quality but this one is absolutely
terrible, I can't emphasised that enough. I begun this book with high
enthusiasm for this subject but now my enthusiasm has totally diminished. Apart from the appalling level of errors there is also a high level or
repetition, which can only be down to poor communication among its
authors.
Then in other areas you'll find exceptional weak explanations or
explanations lacking altogether."

"Typos, inconsistent examples, sidetracked, advocate for Micr," August 16, 2001

Here you are, Kevin, gushing your opinion of your book and trying like
hell
to get that perfect 5 star rating:

Beginning to End SQL Programming, April 11, 2001
Reviewer: Kevin Spencer (Pell City, AL USA) - See all my reviews
I am one of the authors of this book, so of course my rating is going to
be
a little prejudiced. However, I must say that I'm very proud of this work, and after reading the complete work, I thought it should be called
"Beginning to End SQL Programming." There isn't a single aspect of SQL
that
is not covered in this book. While it is designed to cover using SQL from the beginning, and written in a style that is easy for novices to
understand, it covers more about the actual use of SQL than any other SQL book that I've seen. I actually use it as a reference myself!

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...117079903/sr=1 -2/ref=sr_1_2/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

-----------------------------------
Beginning Mac Programming
by Jeff Thompson, Kevin Spencer
1 Star rating - 1 reviewer. Come on Kevin, why didn't you give yourself a 5
star rating on this one. Too embarrassed?
Comment:
"poor tutorial, but good overview of cocoa and carbon", February 24, 2002 "...Magic code appears in the project without ever being introduced in the tutorial. There are multiple errors in the tutorial as well. I guess it is good practice to be able to debug on your own."

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...117079903/sr=1 -3/ref=sr_1_3/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

---------------------
All of this and you have the nerve to bleat about on about the grammatical and spelling errors that posters make and how so many programmers are dumb and lazy.

You are a genius in your own mind only. No true genius would be satisfied with mediocrity.


"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Here's a Freebie:

' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
Me.ShareKnowledge = False
Else
Me.ShareKnowledge = True
End If

' Non-Conditional
Me.NeedCode = False
Me.Educate()

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.
"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
> Hello,
>
> I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like website
> visitors to be able to download code that I would like to make
> available
> to
> them and that would be residing on my personal server.
>
> Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so that > I
> can
> implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to
> convert
> from C# if necessary.
>
> Thanks
>
>



Nov 19 '05 #11

P: n/a
Kevin,

I am not your enemy. Nor do I regard you as mine. I said what I said with
no malice, though I stand behind it 100%. I can only hope that you be more
mindful of what you say to people, and better yet, be mindful of the
judgements you make of people.
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:e#**************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Pwnd :)

Hopefully he learns his lesson.
I learn every day, especially from my enemies. If a doctor doesn't take

the medicine he prescribes, how good is he?

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Lee" <no***************@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@195.129. 110.130...

Pwnd :)

Hopefully he learns his lesson.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in
news:QT****************@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com :
Kevin,

You have a lot of nerve to be so condescending. Before you write
little snide code snippets, you need to clean up around your own front
door. Or better yet, clean up your own books and code. Especially
when anyone can go to Amazon.com and see the reviews of your books.

Especially after you helped write one book with that squeaked out a 3
star rating after you bolstered it with your own 5 star rating.
Especially when you helped to write another that bombed outright.
Especially when and you are the only common denominator between the
two.

Especially when the complaints were that the code for BOTH books was
riddled with errors. One review said that 80% of the code was
incorrect in the Beginning SQL Programming book was incorrect.
Beginning SQL Programming (Programmer to Programmer)
by John Kauffman, Brian Matsik, Kevin Spencer, Ian Herbert, Sakhr
Youness, Julian Skinner
3 Star rating based on 11 reviews - pumped up with your own glowing
"review" of your work.

"Overpriced for meager information", July 27, 2001

"Rubbish", November 22, 2002

"Absolutely Appalling!!!", October 18, 2002
Reviewer: MR M J O'Sullivan "gameshaven" (London) - See all my
reviews
"This has got to be the worst book on any computing subject ever
published. The try it out sections and code snippets throughout the
book are about 80% incorrect, honestly the level of errors and poor
coding is disgraceful. Wrox books are normally of a very high quality
but this one is absolutely terrible, I can't emphasised that enough. I
begun this book with high enthusiasm for this subject but now my
enthusiasm has totally diminished. Apart from the appalling level of
errors there is also a high level or repetition, which can only be
down to poor communication among its authors. Then in other areas
you'll find exceptional weak explanations or explanations lacking
altogether."

"Typos, inconsistent examples, sidetracked, advocate for Micr," August
16, 2001

Here you are, Kevin, gushing your opinion of your book and trying like
hell to get that perfect 5 star rating:

Beginning to End SQL Programming, April 11, 2001
Reviewer: Kevin Spencer (Pell City, AL USA) - See all my reviews
I am one of the authors of this book, so of course my rating is going
to be a little prejudiced. However, I must say that I'm very proud of
this work, and after reading the complete work, I thought it should be
called "Beginning to End SQL Programming." There isn't a single aspect
of SQL that is not covered in this book. While it is designed to cover
using SQL from the beginning, and written in a style that is easy for
novices to understand, it covers more about the actual use of SQL than
any other SQL book that I've seen. I actually use it as a reference
myself!

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...qid=1117079903
/sr=1 -2/ref=sr_1_2/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

-----------------------------------
Beginning Mac Programming
by Jeff Thompson, Kevin Spencer
1 Star rating - 1 reviewer. Come on Kevin, why didn't you give
yourself a 5 star rating on this one. Too embarrassed?
Comment:
"poor tutorial, but good overview of cocoa and carbon", February 24,
2002 "...Magic code appears in the project without ever being
introduced in the tutorial. There are multiple errors in the tutorial
as well. I guess it is good practice to be able to debug on your own."

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...qid=1117079903
/sr=1 -3/ref=sr_1_3/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

---------------------
All of this and you have the nerve to bleat about on about the
grammatical and spelling errors that posters make and how so many
programmers are dumb and lazy.

You are a genius in your own mind only. No true genius would be
satisfied with mediocrity.


"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Here's a Freebie:

' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
Me.ShareKnowledge = False
Else
Me.ShareKnowledge = True
End If

' Non-Conditional
Me.NeedCode = False
Me.Educate()

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.
"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
> Hello,
>
> I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like
> website visitors to be able to download code that I would like to
> make available to
> them and that would be residing on my personal server.
>
> Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so
> that I can
> implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to
> convert from C# if necessary.
>
> Thanks
>
>


Nov 19 '05 #12

P: n/a
Lee,

I never intended to be involved in such an exchange. I hope there will be
no more.

Can't we just all get along?
swaregirl
"Lee" <no***************@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@195.129. 110.130...

Pwnd :)

Hopefully he learns his lesson.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in
news:QT****************@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com :
Kevin,

You have a lot of nerve to be so condescending. Before you write
little snide code snippets, you need to clean up around your own front
door. Or better yet, clean up your own books and code. Especially
when anyone can go to Amazon.com and see the reviews of your books.

Especially after you helped write one book with that squeaked out a 3
star rating after you bolstered it with your own 5 star rating.
Especially when you helped to write another that bombed outright.
Especially when and you are the only common denominator between the
two.

Especially when the complaints were that the code for BOTH books was
riddled with errors. One review said that 80% of the code was
incorrect in the Beginning SQL Programming book was incorrect.
Beginning SQL Programming (Programmer to Programmer)
by John Kauffman, Brian Matsik, Kevin Spencer, Ian Herbert, Sakhr
Youness, Julian Skinner
3 Star rating based on 11 reviews - pumped up with your own glowing
"review" of your work.

"Overpriced for meager information", July 27, 2001

"Rubbish", November 22, 2002

"Absolutely Appalling!!!", October 18, 2002
Reviewer: MR M J O'Sullivan "gameshaven" (London) - See all my
reviews
"This has got to be the worst book on any computing subject ever
published. The try it out sections and code snippets throughout the
book are about 80% incorrect, honestly the level of errors and poor
coding is disgraceful. Wrox books are normally of a very high quality
but this one is absolutely terrible, I can't emphasised that enough. I
begun this book with high enthusiasm for this subject but now my
enthusiasm has totally diminished. Apart from the appalling level of
errors there is also a high level or repetition, which can only be
down to poor communication among its authors. Then in other areas
you'll find exceptional weak explanations or explanations lacking
altogether."

"Typos, inconsistent examples, sidetracked, advocate for Micr," August
16, 2001

Here you are, Kevin, gushing your opinion of your book and trying like
hell to get that perfect 5 star rating:

Beginning to End SQL Programming, April 11, 2001
Reviewer: Kevin Spencer (Pell City, AL USA) - See all my reviews
I am one of the authors of this book, so of course my rating is going
to be a little prejudiced. However, I must say that I'm very proud of
this work, and after reading the complete work, I thought it should be
called "Beginning to End SQL Programming." There isn't a single aspect
of SQL that is not covered in this book. While it is designed to cover
using SQL from the beginning, and written in a style that is easy for
novices to understand, it covers more about the actual use of SQL than
any other SQL book that I've seen. I actually use it as a reference
myself!

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...qid=1117079903
/sr=1 -2/ref=sr_1_2/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

-----------------------------------
Beginning Mac Programming
by Jeff Thompson, Kevin Spencer
1 Star rating - 1 reviewer. Come on Kevin, why didn't you give
yourself a 5 star rating on this one. Too embarrassed?
Comment:
"poor tutorial, but good overview of cocoa and carbon", February 24,
2002 "...Magic code appears in the project without ever being
introduced in the tutorial. There are multiple errors in the tutorial
as well. I guess it is good practice to be able to debug on your own."

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...qid=1117079903
/sr=1 -3/ref=sr_1_3/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

---------------------
All of this and you have the nerve to bleat about on about the
grammatical and spelling errors that posters make and how so many
programmers are dumb and lazy.

You are a genius in your own mind only. No true genius would be
satisfied with mediocrity.


"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Here's a Freebie:

' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
Me.ShareKnowledge = False
Else
Me.ShareKnowledge = True
End If

' Non-Conditional
Me.NeedCode = False
Me.Educate()

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.
"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
> Hello,
>
> I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like
> website visitors to be able to download code that I would like to
> make available to
> them and that would be residing on my personal server.
>
> Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so
> that I can
> implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to
> convert from C# if necessary.
>
> Thanks
>
>


Nov 19 '05 #13

P: n/a
> Second, learn
and apply logic with discipline. Third, learn programming. Last, teach
others as others have taught you. And always continue to learn.

We can agree on this, and, believe it or not, I do this. Your lecture was
unnesseccary.


I would have to say a waste of my precious little time, and I'll waste no
more on you. You are unteachable. Now, as you no doubt feel you must, have
your last word (if possible), and leave me alone (if possible). If you do
not leave me alone, I'll simply put you on my blocked senders list, and you
can rant all you like about how evil and stupid I am to the rest of the
uncaring world. May you have an interesting life, and attract the attention
of important people.

Yours in arrogance and condescension,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:SX***************@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com. ..
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#w*************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Thank you for your attempt at belittling me. Every attack is an

opportunity
to grow, sensai. However, it should be noted that:


Normally, I would never have posted such statements. I much prefer to
seek
common ground. I have used newsgroups, especially technical ones back
when
there was no graphical interface on the Internet, and I have never seen
any
posts that matched yours in response to someone seeking help.

However, you took the time and made a great effort to be snide and
insulting. So I just had to know more about you. And I found out that you
were human after all. Real human. Those who live in glass houses should
throw no stones.

If you learn anything from this exchange, I would hope that it would be
that
you are not so much above the fray as you might think. I hope that you
might gain some humility and do away with your need and desire to insult
people. I hope that you may see that the contempt that you have shown
regarding your perceived shortcomings in others can be directed right back
at you. I hope that you feel the need to direct your judgement more
towards
yourself and less towards others.

I have no contempt for you, personally. However, I have no problem
holding
up the mirror that was your judgement and to place it squarely in your
face.
1. I was not the primary author of any of those books. I contributed

several
chapters in each. The primary author was John Kauffman, who you should be
insulting for the opinions you read, I suppose.


You failed the test which was to take your own advice regarding
responsibility. And taking true responsibility means never blaming
others.
You went on and on about what your mother taught you, but you did not
learn
your lesson well.

Here's a heads up. When you put your name on a paper, manuscript or book,
ESPECIALLY when it is published, you don't have the luxury of palming its
failures or shortcomings off on the other authors.

Cowboy up, dude!
2. You haven't actually READ any of the books, but are simply quoting the
opinions of others in a rather lame attempt to belittle me. I must
compliment your ability to research, but you need to direct it towards

that
which is useful.

Are you kidding? Why would I buy a book that had such consistently
horrible
reviews? They didn't just say that the book sucked. They went into
painful
detail regarding coding errors.

The review of your book was among the more scathing that I have seen
relative to a techncial book, and I've looked up many technical book
review.

3. Opinions are like a**holes. Not only does everybody have one, but they
all stink. Only a dog would find one interesting.

So why did you put your stinking two cents worth in the first place? Do
you
think that you are Jesus, the only man with the right to cast the first
stone?
4. I was attempting to help you. I speak from experience. You speak from
bitterness.


You hit someone over the head with a frying pan and then say that you were
trying to kill a mosquito? Try again.

I harbor no bitterness towards you. I can't be tempted or bribed into it.
Why should I when you have shown yourself to be unworthy of your own
advice?
Perhaps you might like to check out my web site, which is full
of code, all of which I wrote myself. It also contains articles,

tutorials,
and quite a bit of other free material regardin ASP, ASP.Net and

programming
in general, all of which I wrote myself..


We know, we know. You would NEVER look at any code in the Microsoft .NET
namespaces. You would never, ever use it to jumpstart yourself. And I
just
can't figure out why Bill Gates would ever allow any code samples in .NET
help in the first place? We lazy morons should be able to figure out how
to
write the code from scratch, from the namespace class descriptions alone!
5. You misunderstood my attempt to make a point with a bit of humor.


I misunderstood nothing. Try again. Before my last two posts, I checked
with you to see if I was misunderstanding you. In a subsequent post, you
made it clear to me that I wasn't and proceeded to give me a lecture on
work
ethic, your mother, etc.

And I am quite sure that you found humor in what you said. Statements are
always funny to the guy who is dishing out contempt and insults.
I was
not implying that you are ignorant, although I'm beginning to think that

may
be the case. I was making several points.


There is nothing wrong with igonrance. Ignorance can be cured with
knowledge. And I am on the road to curing my ignorance on the specific
problem that I was trying to solve in ASP.NET

Stupidity is a totally different matter and is incurable without a change
of
mind and heart.

And for someone who takes the time to point out the real or perceived
shortcomings of others especially when the accuser himself has obvious and
glaring ones of his or her own , that is, well, you figure it out.
One cannot teach what one does not
know. Regardless of whether one has knowledge or not, one does not need

code
written by other people (which is likely to be unreliable, as is one's

own,
unless checked extremely carefully), and one needs to continually educate
one's self. All of these points apply to myself as well as everyone else.


There you go assuming again. You assume that I am not taking it upon
myself
to go through the related namespaces and to really understand it. You
assume that all programmers who ask for help won't do that. You are
wrong.
But of course, if you hold on to the belief that every software developer
who learns from sample code would never take it upon themselves to
understand it or even make it better, then you get to maintain your false
sense of superiority.
In conclusion, you have not made me look bad, as hard as you have tried.

You
have made yourself look like a petty child, and proven my point in the
process.


No, Kevin, you've besmirched your own credibility because your words do
not
match your actions in a published manuscript. You made it real easy.

Programming is a discipline that requires a relentless logic. First
learn discipline. Develop an anal-retentive habit of criticism,
especially
of yourself.


Although what you say is true here, you make yourself look really bad by
stating that fact and having a book out there that got complaints about
code
errors.
Trust no one, and no code, especially your own.


So maybe you saw it coming?

Second, learn
and apply logic with discipline. Third, learn programming. Last, teach
others as others have taught you. And always continue to learn.

We can agree on this, and, believe it or not, I do this. Your lecture was
unnesseccary.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:QT****************@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com ...
> Kevin,
>
> You have a lot of nerve to be so condescending. Before you write
> little
> snide code snippets, you need to clean up around your own front door. Or > better yet, clean up your own books and code. Especially when anyone can > go
> to Amazon.com and see the reviews of your books.
>
> Especially after you helped write one book with that squeaked out a 3 star > rating after you bolstered it with your own 5 star rating. Especially when > you helped to write another that bombed outright. Especially when and you > are the only common denominator between the two.
>
> Especially when the complaints were that the code for BOTH books was
> riddled
> with errors. One review said that 80% of the code was incorrect in the
> Beginning SQL Programming book was incorrect.
>
>
> Beginning SQL Programming (Programmer to Programmer)
> by John Kauffman, Brian Matsik, Kevin Spencer, Ian Herbert, Sakhr Youness, > Julian Skinner
>
>
> 3 Star rating based on 11 reviews - pumped up with your own glowing
> "review"
> of your work.
>
> "Overpriced for meager information", July 27, 2001
>
> "Rubbish", November 22, 2002
>
> "Absolutely Appalling!!!", October 18, 2002
> Reviewer: MR M J O'Sullivan "gameshaven" (London) - See all my
> reviews
> "This has got to be the worst book on any computing subject ever
> published.
> The try it out sections and code snippets throughout the book are about
> 80%
> incorrect, honestly the level of errors and poor coding is disgraceful.
> Wrox
> books are normally of a very high quality but this one is absolutely
> terrible, I can't emphasised that enough. I begun this book with high
> enthusiasm for this subject but now my enthusiasm has totally diminished. > Apart from the appalling level of errors there is also a high level or
> repetition, which can only be down to poor communication among its
> authors.
> Then in other areas you'll find exceptional weak explanations or
> explanations lacking altogether."
>
> "Typos, inconsistent examples, sidetracked, advocate for Micr," August 16, > 2001
>
> Here you are, Kevin, gushing your opinion of your book and trying like
> hell
> to get that perfect 5 star rating:
>
> Beginning to End SQL Programming, April 11, 2001
> Reviewer: Kevin Spencer (Pell City, AL USA) - See all my reviews
> I am one of the authors of this book, so of course my rating is going
> to
> be
> a little prejudiced. However, I must say that I'm very proud of this work, > and after reading the complete work, I thought it should be called
> "Beginning to End SQL Programming." There isn't a single aspect of SQL
> that
> is not covered in this book. While it is designed to cover using SQL from > the beginning, and written in a style that is easy for novices to
> understand, it covers more about the actual use of SQL than any other SQL > book that I've seen. I actually use it as a reference myself!
>
>
>
> http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...117079903/sr=1 > -2/ref=sr_1_2/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books
>
> -----------------------------------
>
>
> Beginning Mac Programming
> by Jeff Thompson, Kevin Spencer
>
>
> 1 Star rating - 1 reviewer. Come on Kevin, why didn't you give
> yourself a > 5
> star rating on this one. Too embarrassed?
> Comment:
> "poor tutorial, but good overview of cocoa and carbon", February 24, 2002 > "...Magic code appears in the project without ever being introduced in the > tutorial. There are multiple errors in the tutorial as well. I guess it is > good practice to be able to debug on your own."
>
> http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...117079903/sr=1 > -3/ref=sr_1_3/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books
>
> ---------------------
> All of this and you have the nerve to bleat about on about the grammatical > and spelling errors that posters make and how so many programmers are dumb > and lazy.
>
> You are a genius in your own mind only. No true genius would be satisfied > with mediocrity.
>
>
>
>
> "Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
> news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> Here's a Freebie:
>>
>> ' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
>> If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
>> Me.ShareKnowledge = False
>> Else
>> Me.ShareKnowledge = True
>> End If
>>
>> ' Non-Conditional
>> Me.NeedCode = False
>> Me.Educate()
>>
>> --
>> HTH,
>>
>> Kevin Spencer
>> Microsoft MVP
>> .Net Developer
>> Sometimes you eat the elephant.
>> Sometimes the elephant eats you.
>>
>>
>> "Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
>> > Hello,
>> >
>> > I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like website
>> > visitors to be able to download code that I would like to make
>> > available
>> > to
>> > them and that would be residing on my personal server.
>> >
>> > Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so that >> > I
>> > can
>> > implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to
>> > convert
>> > from C# if necessary.
>> >
>> > Thanks
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>



Nov 19 '05 #14

P: n/a

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:OA**************@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
BTW, one of the books you mentioned was apparently co-authored by a
DIFFERENT "Kevin Spencer." I have never used a Mac, nor written about it.
I'm sure he will appreciate your criticism based upon the opinions of others as well, if he reads this newsgroup. Good thing my name isn't "John Smith!"
Ok, I'll give you that one. That leaves you only one book with less than
stellar reviews.
--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:%2***************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Thank you for your attempt at belittling me. Every attack is an
opportunity to grow, sensai. However, it should be noted that:

1. I was not the primary author of any of those books. I contributed
several chapters in each. The primary author was John Kauffman, who you
should be insulting for the opinions you read, I suppose.

2. You haven't actually READ any of the books, but are simply quoting the opinions of others in a rather lame attempt to belittle me. I must
compliment your ability to research, but you need to direct it towards
that which is useful.

3. Opinions are like a**holes. Not only does everybody have one, but they all stink. Only a dog would find one interesting.

4. I was attempting to help you. I speak from experience. You speak from
bitterness. Perhaps you might like to check out my web site, which is full of code, all of which I wrote myself. It also contains articles,
tutorials, and quite a bit of other free material regardin ASP, ASP.Net
and programming in general, all of which I wrote myself..

5. You misunderstood my attempt to make a point with a bit of humor. I was not implying that you are ignorant, although I'm beginning to think that
may be the case. I was making several points. One cannot teach what one
does not know. Regardless of whether one has knowledge or not, one does
not need code written by other people (which is likely to be unreliable,
as is one's own, unless checked extremely carefully), and one needs to
continually educate one's self. All of these points apply to myself as
well as everyone else.

In conclusion, you have not made me look bad, as hard as you have tried.
You have made yourself look like a petty child, and proven my point in the process. Programming is a discipline that requires a relentless logic.
First learn discipline. Develop an anal-retentive habit of criticism,
especially of yourself. Trust no one, and no code, especially your own.
Second, learn and apply logic with discipline. Third, learn programming. Last, teach others as others have taught you. And always continue to
learn.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:QT****************@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com ...
Kevin,

You have a lot of nerve to be so condescending. Before you write little snide code snippets, you need to clean up around your own front door. Or better yet, clean up your own books and code. Especially when anyone can go
to Amazon.com and see the reviews of your books.

Especially after you helped write one book with that squeaked out a 3
star
rating after you bolstered it with your own 5 star rating. Especially
when
you helped to write another that bombed outright. Especially when and you are the only common denominator between the two.

Especially when the complaints were that the code for BOTH books was
riddled
with errors. One review said that 80% of the code was incorrect in the
Beginning SQL Programming book was incorrect.
Beginning SQL Programming (Programmer to Programmer)
by John Kauffman, Brian Matsik, Kevin Spencer, Ian Herbert, Sakhr
Youness,
Julian Skinner
3 Star rating based on 11 reviews - pumped up with your own glowing
"review"
of your work.

"Overpriced for meager information", July 27, 2001

"Rubbish", November 22, 2002

"Absolutely Appalling!!!", October 18, 2002
Reviewer: MR M J O'Sullivan "gameshaven" (London) - See all my
reviews
"This has got to be the worst book on any computing subject ever
published.
The try it out sections and code snippets throughout the book are about
80%
incorrect, honestly the level of errors and poor coding is disgraceful.
Wrox
books are normally of a very high quality but this one is absolutely
terrible, I can't emphasised that enough. I begun this book with high
enthusiasm for this subject but now my enthusiasm has totally diminished. Apart from the appalling level of errors there is also a high level or
repetition, which can only be down to poor communication among its
authors.
Then in other areas you'll find exceptional weak explanations or
explanations lacking altogether."

"Typos, inconsistent examples, sidetracked, advocate for Micr," August
16,
2001

Here you are, Kevin, gushing your opinion of your book and trying like
hell
to get that perfect 5 star rating:

Beginning to End SQL Programming, April 11, 2001
Reviewer: Kevin Spencer (Pell City, AL USA) - See all my reviews
I am one of the authors of this book, so of course my rating is going to be
a little prejudiced. However, I must say that I'm very proud of this
work,
and after reading the complete work, I thought it should be called
"Beginning to End SQL Programming." There isn't a single aspect of SQL
that
is not covered in this book. While it is designed to cover using SQL from the beginning, and written in a style that is easy for novices to
understand, it covers more about the actual use of SQL than any other SQL book that I've seen. I actually use it as a reference myself!

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...117079903/sr=1 -2/ref=sr_1_2/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

-----------------------------------
Beginning Mac Programming
by Jeff Thompson, Kevin Spencer
1 Star rating - 1 reviewer. Come on Kevin, why didn't you give yourself a 5
star rating on this one. Too embarrassed?
Comment:
"poor tutorial, but good overview of cocoa and carbon", February 24, 2002 "...Magic code appears in the project without ever being introduced in
the
tutorial. There are multiple errors in the tutorial as well. I guess it
is
good practice to be able to debug on your own."

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...117079903/sr=1 -3/ref=sr_1_3/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books

---------------------
All of this and you have the nerve to bleat about on about the
grammatical
and spelling errors that posters make and how so many programmers are
dumb
and lazy.

You are a genius in your own mind only. No true genius would be
satisfied
with mediocrity.


"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Here's a Freebie:

' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
Me.ShareKnowledge = False
Else
Me.ShareKnowledge = True
End If

' Non-Conditional
Me.NeedCode = False
Me.Educate()

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.
"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
> Hello,
>
> I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like website
> visitors to be able to download code that I would like to make
> available
> to
> them and that would be residing on my personal server.
>
> Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so that > I
> can
> implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to
> convert
> from C# if necessary.
>
> Thanks
>
>



Nov 19 '05 #15

P: n/a
On Thu, 26 May 2005 16:57:56 -0400, "Kevin Spencer"
<ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote:
I would have to say a waste of my precious little time, and I'll waste no
more on you. You are unteachable. Now, as you no doubt feel you must, have
your last word (if possible), and leave me alone (if possible). If you do
not leave me alone, I'll simply put you on my blocked senders list, and you
can rant all you like about how evil and stupid I am to the rest of the
uncaring world. May you have an interesting life, and attract the attention
of important people.


You're an ass. Please put me on your beloved blocked senders list as
well; I'd hate to offend you with a perfectly relevant question in an
appropriate newsgroup.

-shane

Nov 19 '05 #16

P: n/a

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:u9**************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
Second, learn
and apply logic with discipline. Third, learn programming. Last, teach
others as others have taught you. And always continue to learn.

We can agree on this, and, believe it or not, I do this. Your lecture was
unnesseccary.


I would have to say a waste of my precious little time, and I'll waste no
more on you. You are unteachable.


If what you have to teach me is how to be rude and full of
self-righteousness, I will consider that a compliment.
Now, as you no doubt feel you must, have
your last word (if possible), and leave me alone (if possible). If you do
not leave me alone, I'll simply put you on my blocked senders list, and you can rant all you like about how evil and stupid I am to the rest of the
uncaring world. May you have an interesting life, and attract the attention of important people.

I wouldn't call you evil. You probably think that you are doing the world a
favor by giving instructions but so blinded by your own false sense of
superiority that you yourself can't seem to follow you own instruction.

I am posting to a public forum. I am not breaking any legal or moral code.
I have not e-mailed you directly, so do what you must. Block me or
whatever. I don't care.

I never asked for you to post your trite, mean-spritited code or to give me
your hypocritical lectures in the first place.

And don't expect that you can talk to anyone in any fashion that you choose
to and that people will have no say in the matter.
Yours in arrogance and condescension,
On this, we can agree.

But don't forget "self-righteous".

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:SX***************@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com. ..

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#w*************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Thank you for your attempt at belittling me. Every attack is an

opportunity
to grow, sensai. However, it should be noted that:


Normally, I would never have posted such statements. I much prefer to
seek
common ground. I have used newsgroups, especially technical ones back
when
there was no graphical interface on the Internet, and I have never seen
any
posts that matched yours in response to someone seeking help.

However, you took the time and made a great effort to be snide and
insulting. So I just had to know more about you. And I found out that you were human after all. Real human. Those who live in glass houses should
throw no stones.

If you learn anything from this exchange, I would hope that it would be
that
you are not so much above the fray as you might think. I hope that you
might gain some humility and do away with your need and desire to insult
people. I hope that you may see that the contempt that you have shown
regarding your perceived shortcomings in others can be directed right back at you. I hope that you feel the need to direct your judgement more
towards
yourself and less towards others.

I have no contempt for you, personally. However, I have no problem
holding
up the mirror that was your judgement and to place it squarely in your
face.
1. I was not the primary author of any of those books. I contributed

several
chapters in each. The primary author was John Kauffman, who you should be insulting for the opinions you read, I suppose.


You failed the test which was to take your own advice regarding
responsibility. And taking true responsibility means never blaming
others.
You went on and on about what your mother taught you, but you did not
learn
your lesson well.

Here's a heads up. When you put your name on a paper, manuscript or book, ESPECIALLY when it is published, you don't have the luxury of palming its failures or shortcomings off on the other authors.

Cowboy up, dude!
2. You haven't actually READ any of the books, but are simply quoting the opinions of others in a rather lame attempt to belittle me. I must
compliment your ability to research, but you need to direct it towards

that
which is useful.

Are you kidding? Why would I buy a book that had such consistently
horrible
reviews? They didn't just say that the book sucked. They went into
painful
detail regarding coding errors.

The review of your book was among the more scathing that I have seen
relative to a techncial book, and I've looked up many technical book
review.

3. Opinions are like a**holes. Not only does everybody have one, but they all stink. Only a dog would find one interesting.

So why did you put your stinking two cents worth in the first place? Do
you
think that you are Jesus, the only man with the right to cast the first
stone?
4. I was attempting to help you. I speak from experience. You speak from bitterness.


You hit someone over the head with a frying pan and then say that you were trying to kill a mosquito? Try again.

I harbor no bitterness towards you. I can't be tempted or bribed into it. Why should I when you have shown yourself to be unworthy of your own
advice?
Perhaps you might like to check out my web site, which is full
of code, all of which I wrote myself. It also contains articles,

tutorials,
and quite a bit of other free material regardin ASP, ASP.Net and

programming
in general, all of which I wrote myself..


We know, we know. You would NEVER look at any code in the Microsoft ..NET namespaces. You would never, ever use it to jumpstart yourself. And I
just
can't figure out why Bill Gates would ever allow any code samples in ..NET help in the first place? We lazy morons should be able to figure out how to
write the code from scratch, from the namespace class descriptions alone!
5. You misunderstood my attempt to make a point with a bit of humor.


I misunderstood nothing. Try again. Before my last two posts, I checked with you to see if I was misunderstanding you. In a subsequent post, you made it clear to me that I wasn't and proceeded to give me a lecture on
work
ethic, your mother, etc.

And I am quite sure that you found humor in what you said. Statements are always funny to the guy who is dishing out contempt and insults.
I was
not implying that you are ignorant, although I'm beginning to think that
may
be the case. I was making several points.


There is nothing wrong with igonrance. Ignorance can be cured with
knowledge. And I am on the road to curing my ignorance on the specific
problem that I was trying to solve in ASP.NET

Stupidity is a totally different matter and is incurable without a change of
mind and heart.

And for someone who takes the time to point out the real or perceived
shortcomings of others especially when the accuser himself has obvious and glaring ones of his or her own , that is, well, you figure it out.
One cannot teach what one does not
know. Regardless of whether one has knowledge or not, one does not need

code
written by other people (which is likely to be unreliable, as is one's

own,
unless checked extremely carefully), and one needs to continually
educate one's self. All of these points apply to myself as well as everyone else.


There you go assuming again. You assume that I am not taking it upon
myself
to go through the related namespaces and to really understand it. You
assume that all programmers who ask for help won't do that. You are
wrong.
But of course, if you hold on to the belief that every software

developer who learns from sample code would never take it upon themselves to
understand it or even make it better, then you get to maintain your false sense of superiority.
In conclusion, you have not made me look bad, as hard as you have tried.
You
have made yourself look like a petty child, and proven my point in the
process.


No, Kevin, you've besmirched your own credibility because your words do
not
match your actions in a published manuscript. You made it real easy.

Programming is a discipline that requires a relentless logic. First
learn discipline. Develop an anal-retentive habit of criticism,
especially
of yourself.


Although what you say is true here, you make yourself look really bad by
stating that fact and having a book out there that got complaints about
code
errors.
Trust no one, and no code, especially your own.


So maybe you saw it coming?

Second, learn
and apply logic with discipline. Third, learn programming. Last, teach
others as others have taught you. And always continue to learn.

We can agree on this, and, believe it or not, I do this. Your lecture was unnesseccary.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:QT****************@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com ...
> Kevin,
>
> You have a lot of nerve to be so condescending. Before you write
> little
> snide code snippets, you need to clean up around your own front door.

Or
> better yet, clean up your own books and code. Especially when anyone

can
> go
> to Amazon.com and see the reviews of your books.
>
> Especially after you helped write one book with that squeaked out a 3

star
> rating after you bolstered it with your own 5 star rating. Especially

when
> you helped to write another that bombed outright. Especially when and

you
> are the only common denominator between the two.
>
> Especially when the complaints were that the code for BOTH books was
> riddled
> with errors. One review said that 80% of the code was incorrect in
the > Beginning SQL Programming book was incorrect.
>
>
> Beginning SQL Programming (Programmer to Programmer)
> by John Kauffman, Brian Matsik, Kevin Spencer, Ian Herbert, Sakhr

Youness,
> Julian Skinner
>
>
> 3 Star rating based on 11 reviews - pumped up with your own glowing
> "review"
> of your work.
>
> "Overpriced for meager information", July 27, 2001
>
> "Rubbish", November 22, 2002
>
> "Absolutely Appalling!!!", October 18, 2002
> Reviewer: MR M J O'Sullivan "gameshaven" (London) - See all my
> reviews
> "This has got to be the worst book on any computing subject ever
> published.
> The try it out sections and code snippets throughout the book are about > 80%
> incorrect, honestly the level of errors and poor coding is disgraceful. > Wrox
> books are normally of a very high quality but this one is absolutely
> terrible, I can't emphasised that enough. I begun this book with high
> enthusiasm for this subject but now my enthusiasm has totally

diminished.
> Apart from the appalling level of errors there is also a high level or > repetition, which can only be down to poor communication among its
> authors.
> Then in other areas you'll find exceptional weak explanations or
> explanations lacking altogether."
>
> "Typos, inconsistent examples, sidetracked, advocate for Micr," August 16,
> 2001
>
> Here you are, Kevin, gushing your opinion of your book and trying
like > hell
> to get that perfect 5 star rating:
>
> Beginning to End SQL Programming, April 11, 2001
> Reviewer: Kevin Spencer (Pell City, AL USA) - See all my reviews
> I am one of the authors of this book, so of course my rating is going
> to
> be
> a little prejudiced. However, I must say that I'm very proud of this

work,
> and after reading the complete work, I thought it should be called
> "Beginning to End SQL Programming." There isn't a single aspect of SQL > that
> is not covered in this book. While it is designed to cover using SQL

from
> the beginning, and written in a style that is easy for novices to
> understand, it covers more about the actual use of SQL than any other

SQL
> book that I've seen. I actually use it as a reference myself!
>
>
>
>

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...117079903/sr=1
> -2/ref=sr_1_2/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books
>
> -----------------------------------
>
>
> Beginning Mac Programming
> by Jeff Thompson, Kevin Spencer
>
>
> 1 Star rating - 1 reviewer. Come on Kevin, why didn't you give
> yourself

a
> 5
> star rating on this one. Too embarrassed?
> Comment:
> "poor tutorial, but good overview of cocoa and carbon", February 24,

2002
> "...Magic code appears in the project without ever being introduced in the
> tutorial. There are multiple errors in the tutorial as well. I guess
it is
> good practice to be able to debug on your own."
>
>

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...117079903/sr=1 > -3/ref=sr_1_3/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books
>
> ---------------------
> All of this and you have the nerve to bleat about on about the

grammatical
> and spelling errors that posters make and how so many programmers are

dumb
> and lazy.
>
> You are a genius in your own mind only. No true genius would be

satisfied
> with mediocrity.
>
>
>
>
> "Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
> news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> Here's a Freebie:
>>
>> ' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
>> If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
>> Me.ShareKnowledge = False
>> Else
>> Me.ShareKnowledge = True
>> End If
>>
>> ' Non-Conditional
>> Me.NeedCode = False
>> Me.Educate()
>>
>> --
>> HTH,
>>
>> Kevin Spencer
>> Microsoft MVP
>> .Net Developer
>> Sometimes you eat the elephant.
>> Sometimes the elephant eats you.
>>
>>
>> "Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
>> > Hello,
>> >
>> > I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like website >> > visitors to be able to download code that I would like to make
>> > available
>> > to
>> > them and that would be residing on my personal server.
>> >
>> > Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend so

that
>> > I
>> > can
>> > implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to
>> > convert
>> > from C# if necessary.
>> >
>> > Thanks
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>



Nov 19 '05 #17

P: n/a
Lee

Ok, the guy is mush on the ground now. Time to stop pummeling him :)

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in
news:Rn*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m:
Happily, I solved the majority of my problem at about 6 a.m. I still
have some fine tuning to do, but I am experimenting right now. I will
post the results when I am done.

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#c**************@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
My point is this: How can you share what you know if you expect other

people
to provide it for you? That's putting the cart before the horse.


That statement makes no sense. How can I share something that I knew
very little about at the time? Why would I ask about something that I
know little about?

And you also assume that I never share what it is that I do know. I
have found a
lot of tips on how to perform certain functions as a result of
reading, studying, practicing, and sometimes going to various
newsgroups. I have also come across questions from other people that
I have had answers for and I
willingly posted responses to those in need. Was it on this
newsgroup? No it
wasn't, but it was in the Microsoft programming realm involving both
managed and unmanaged code, VB6 and VB.NET.

Programming is a discipline, and requires a lot of hard work to
master. I explain in detail (quite a bit of detail from time to time)
how the technology works, and answer many questions (many a day, in
fact). I don't believe writing code for people helps them in any way.
In fact, it is harmful to them, as it allows them to get themselves
into even greater trouble than they find themselves in at first, as
they get the impression that they don't have to understand
programming in order to do it.


I don't know how you became an MVP, but it would be hard for you to
convince a sane person that you went through every single namespace in
.NET without using code
examples that Microsoft provided. Why would Microsoft provide them in
the documentation if they expected each programmer to figure it all
out by themselves? How would an employer get any work out of his
people if he expected them to reinvent the wheel each time? If you
used other peoples books and their examples in order to get certified
and if you have gone through the MS documentation that comes with
Visual Studio, then you would see for yourself that they tend to take
their examples from the Microsoft documentation. So if you say that
you have never used a code sample, AND that
you are Microsoft certified, AND that you make a living as a software
developer, then you are lying through your teeth.

Maybe you are smarter than everyone else, but not even people I know
who have graduated with Master Degrees from Georgia Tech, Berkeley,
Stanford and MIT in Engineering and Computer Science are so arrogant
as think that code samples are above them. They will
use them to get a jump start and then broaden and deeper their
understanding. I went to a private smaller university, but I have no
problem doing the same.

Of course, the danger of code samples is that a person will not take
the time to understand what it is they are doing and how it fits into
the context of the programming environment, and in the case of .NET,
how the namespaces work. But someone who does that will not last long
as a programmer. We all know that!

The whole purpose of code samples is to get a person on the right
track and to give them an opportunity to delve deeper into context of
the development environment that he or she is working in.

And it is quite presumptuous of you to assume that I would not care to
deepen my understanding once I got some hints or guidance.
In other words, I'm not here to promote myself and my programming
skills, by showing off my code solutions to the world. I don't need
to. I can get

work
as a programmer anywhere, because I've worked hard, and continue
learning every day, as I have for over 10 years now. My mother taught
me to be responsible for myself. That said, every programmer,
including myself,

needs
help from time to time. But they don't need someone to spoon feed
them.

They
NEED to be shown how to feed themselves. When I ask for help, that's
all I ask, and I'm grateful for any clues that someone can provide. I
don't want to be spoon fed. That makes you fat and lazy. I want to be
shown the way

to
feed myself. That makes you strong. And I believe that I should help

people
become strong, not fat and lazy.


Yes, you are here to promote yourself. You have not hesitated to make
a point of how well you were trained by your mother, how hard you have
worked and how responsible you are for yourself. It is obvious how
much contempt you have for people who ask for help (obviously, they
are asking for a spoon feeding). And God help them if they make a
typographical error or grammatical error.

I did not ask someone to build a webpage or a website for me. I asked
for a code sample that was to be a small part of the overall picture.
Are you saying that is wrong and lazy?

When I was a child, I was taken care of. But my parents are gone now,
and

I
find myself without a care-giver. I have to stand on my own, as do we
all

at
one time or another. My mother taught me how to do that, and I will
always be grateful to her. She knew she wouldn't be there to take
care of me forever. In other words, who parents the parents? The best
a parent can do for their offspring is to teach them to fend for
themselves. And I want to be a good "parent," now that I am one.


Your lecture on hard work, discipline, and home training were again
presumptuous and unnecessary, except for the children who sprung forth
from your loins. But maybe they are just as perfect as you, and need
no such lectures.

I didn't call you out by name for help.

If such a request was beneath you, the tasteful thing for you have do
was to quietly
ignore it.

Really, Kevin, who do you think you are? Do you think that you are
above reproach? If so, had you run a simple MS Word spell check, or
better yet, remembered your elementary school grammar, you could have
avoided the misuse of commas at least one of your sentences. No, I
don't tend to pick on the misuse of spelling or grammar by others, but
given that you listed it as one of your pet peeves, I would have
thought that you were above it all. Obviously, you are not.

--
HTH,

This should have been HRH (His Royal Highness), which would go along
very nicely with your Princess.

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:xR*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
> Kevin,
>
> I really didn't want to take what you said the wrong way, so I did
> a search
> on your name relative to your other posts within this newsgroup.
> It seems > that you have some pet peeves, including people asking for sample
> code.
>
> I fully respect your right not to aid or assist someone who is
> asking for > help.
>
> It is not unusual for highly experienced programmers to purchase
> books or > seek advice on programming in a language that is new to them.
> Everyone does
> not feel the need to reinvent the wheel, especially if the wheel is
> something that is used as a utility of sorts. Most of the time,
> that piece
> of code is a small part of the overall code base but may be a
> necessary piece of the puzzle.
>
> Am I misunderstanding the spirit of your posts and your reply? Do
> you think
> that one should reinvent everything themselves? Do you think that there > is
> shame in seeking a code example for something specific that they
> want to do,
> especially when that specific something is done over and over and
> is used > by
> many people?
>
>
> "Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
> news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> Here's a Freebie:
>>
>> ' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
>> If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
>> Me.ShareKnowledge = False
>> Else
>> Me.ShareKnowledge = True
>> End If
>>
>> ' Non-Conditional
>> Me.NeedCode = False
>> Me.Educate()
>>
>> --
>> HTH,
>>
>> Kevin Spencer
>> Microsoft MVP
>> .Net Developer
>> Sometimes you eat the elephant.
>> Sometimes the elephant eats you.
>>
>>
>> "Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
>> > Hello,
>> >
>> > I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like
>> > website visitors to be able to download code that I would like
>> > to make available
>> > to
>> > them and that would be residing on my personal server.
>> >
>> > Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend
>> > so that >> > I
>> > can
>> > implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to
>> > convert
>> > from C# if necessary.
>> >
>> > Thanks
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>





Nov 19 '05 #18

P: n/a
Lee
Swaregirl,

Yes, we can :D
"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in
news:vz****************@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com :
Lee,

I never intended to be involved in such an exchange. I hope there
will be
no more.

Can't we just all get along?
swaregirl
"Lee" <no***************@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@195.129. 110.130...

Pwnd :)

Hopefully he learns his lesson.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in
news:QT****************@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com :
> Kevin,
>
> You have a lot of nerve to be so condescending. Before you write
> little snide code snippets, you need to clean up around your own
> front door. Or better yet, clean up your own books and code.
> Especially when anyone can go to Amazon.com and see the reviews of
> your books.
>
> Especially after you helped write one book with that squeaked out a
> 3 star rating after you bolstered it with your own 5 star rating.
> Especially when you helped to write another that bombed outright.
> Especially when and you are the only common denominator between the
> two.
>
> Especially when the complaints were that the code for BOTH books
> was riddled with errors. One review said that 80% of the code was
> incorrect in the Beginning SQL Programming book was incorrect.
>
>
> Beginning SQL Programming (Programmer to Programmer)
> by John Kauffman, Brian Matsik, Kevin Spencer, Ian Herbert, Sakhr
> Youness, Julian Skinner
>
>
> 3 Star rating based on 11 reviews - pumped up with your own glowing
> "review" of your work.
>
> "Overpriced for meager information", July 27, 2001
>
> "Rubbish", November 22, 2002
>
> "Absolutely Appalling!!!", October 18, 2002
> Reviewer: MR M J O'Sullivan "gameshaven" (London) - See all
> my reviews
> "This has got to be the worst book on any computing subject ever
> published. The try it out sections and code snippets throughout the
> book are about 80% incorrect, honestly the level of errors and poor
> coding is disgraceful. Wrox books are normally of a very high
> quality but this one is absolutely terrible, I can't emphasised
> that enough. I begun this book with high enthusiasm for this
> subject but now my enthusiasm has totally diminished. Apart from
> the appalling level of errors there is also a high level or
> repetition, which can only be down to poor communication among its
> authors. Then in other areas you'll find exceptional weak
> explanations or explanations lacking altogether."
>
> "Typos, inconsistent examples, sidetracked, advocate for Micr,"
> August 16, 2001
>
> Here you are, Kevin, gushing your opinion of your book and trying
> like hell to get that perfect 5 star rating:
>
> Beginning to End SQL Programming, April 11, 2001
> Reviewer: Kevin Spencer (Pell City, AL USA) - See all my
> reviews
> I am one of the authors of this book, so of course my rating is
> going to be a little prejudiced. However, I must say that I'm very
> proud of this work, and after reading the complete work, I thought
> it should be called "Beginning to End SQL Programming." There isn't
> a single aspect of SQL that is not covered in this book. While it
> is designed to cover using SQL from the beginning, and written in a
> style that is easy for novices to understand, it covers more about
> the actual use of SQL than any other SQL book that I've seen. I
> actually use it as a reference myself!
>
>
>
> http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...00/qid=1117079
> 903 /sr=1 -2/ref=sr_1_2/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books
>
> -----------------------------------
>
>
> Beginning Mac Programming
> by Jeff Thompson, Kevin Spencer
>
>
> 1 Star rating - 1 reviewer. Come on Kevin, why didn't you give
> yourself a 5 star rating on this one. Too embarrassed?
> Comment:
> "poor tutorial, but good overview of cocoa and carbon", February
> 24, 2002 "...Magic code appears in the project without ever being
> introduced in the tutorial. There are multiple errors in the
> tutorial as well. I guess it is good practice to be able to debug
> on your own."
>
> http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...04/qid=1117079
> 903 /sr=1 -3/ref=sr_1_3/102-9867468-7270568?v=glance&s=books
>
> ---------------------
> All of this and you have the nerve to bleat about on about the
> grammatical and spelling errors that posters make and how so many
> programmers are dumb and lazy.
>
> You are a genius in your own mind only. No true genius would be
> satisfied with mediocrity.
>
>
>
>
> "Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
> news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> Here's a Freebie:
>>
>> ' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
>> If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
>> Me.ShareKnowledge = False
>> Else
>> Me.ShareKnowledge = True
>> End If
>>
>> ' Non-Conditional
>> Me.NeedCode = False
>> Me.Educate()
>>
>> --
>> HTH,
>>
>> Kevin Spencer
>> Microsoft MVP
>> .Net Developer
>> Sometimes you eat the elephant.
>> Sometimes the elephant eats you.
>>
>>
>> "Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
>> > Hello,
>> >
>> > I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like
>> > website visitors to be able to download code that I would like
>> > to make available to
>> > them and that would be residing on my personal server.
>> >
>> > Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend
>> > so that I can
>> > implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to
>> > convert from C# if necessary.
>> >
>> > Thanks
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>



Nov 19 '05 #19

P: n/a
> Ok, the guy is mush on the ground now. Time to stop pummeling him :)

Mush? Hardly. It is simply not productive to continue such a conversation.

And she did stop. Several days ago. So let's let sleeping dogs lie.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
Ambiguity has a certain quality to it.

"Lee" <no***************@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@212.159. 2.87...

Ok, the guy is mush on the ground now. Time to stop pummeling him :)

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in
news:Rn*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m:
Happily, I solved the majority of my problem at about 6 a.m. I still
have some fine tuning to do, but I am experimenting right now. I will
post the results when I am done.

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:#c**************@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
My point is this: How can you share what you know if you expect other

people
to provide it for you? That's putting the cart before the horse.


That statement makes no sense. How can I share something that I knew
very little about at the time? Why would I ask about something that I
know little about?

And you also assume that I never share what it is that I do know. I
have found a
lot of tips on how to perform certain functions as a result of
reading, studying, practicing, and sometimes going to various
newsgroups. I have also come across questions from other people that
I have had answers for and I
willingly posted responses to those in need. Was it on this
newsgroup? No it
wasn't, but it was in the Microsoft programming realm involving both
managed and unmanaged code, VB6 and VB.NET.

Programming is a discipline, and requires a lot of hard work to
master. I explain in detail (quite a bit of detail from time to time)
how the technology works, and answer many questions (many a day, in
fact). I don't believe writing code for people helps them in any way.
In fact, it is harmful to them, as it allows them to get themselves
into even greater trouble than they find themselves in at first, as
they get the impression that they don't have to understand
programming in order to do it.


I don't know how you became an MVP, but it would be hard for you to
convince a sane person that you went through every single namespace in
.NET without using code
examples that Microsoft provided. Why would Microsoft provide them in
the documentation if they expected each programmer to figure it all
out by themselves? How would an employer get any work out of his
people if he expected them to reinvent the wheel each time? If you
used other peoples books and their examples in order to get certified
and if you have gone through the MS documentation that comes with
Visual Studio, then you would see for yourself that they tend to take
their examples from the Microsoft documentation. So if you say that
you have never used a code sample, AND that
you are Microsoft certified, AND that you make a living as a software
developer, then you are lying through your teeth.

Maybe you are smarter than everyone else, but not even people I know
who have graduated with Master Degrees from Georgia Tech, Berkeley,
Stanford and MIT in Engineering and Computer Science are so arrogant
as think that code samples are above them. They will
use them to get a jump start and then broaden and deeper their
understanding. I went to a private smaller university, but I have no
problem doing the same.

Of course, the danger of code samples is that a person will not take
the time to understand what it is they are doing and how it fits into
the context of the programming environment, and in the case of .NET,
how the namespaces work. But someone who does that will not last long
as a programmer. We all know that!

The whole purpose of code samples is to get a person on the right
track and to give them an opportunity to delve deeper into context of
the development environment that he or she is working in.

And it is quite presumptuous of you to assume that I would not care to
deepen my understanding once I got some hints or guidance.
In other words, I'm not here to promote myself and my programming
skills, by showing off my code solutions to the world. I don't need
to. I can get

work
as a programmer anywhere, because I've worked hard, and continue
learning every day, as I have for over 10 years now. My mother taught
me to be responsible for myself. That said, every programmer,
including myself,

needs
help from time to time. But they don't need someone to spoon feed
them.

They
NEED to be shown how to feed themselves. When I ask for help, that's
all I ask, and I'm grateful for any clues that someone can provide. I
don't want to be spoon fed. That makes you fat and lazy. I want to be
shown the way

to
feed myself. That makes you strong. And I believe that I should help

people
become strong, not fat and lazy.


Yes, you are here to promote yourself. You have not hesitated to make
a point of how well you were trained by your mother, how hard you have
worked and how responsible you are for yourself. It is obvious how
much contempt you have for people who ask for help (obviously, they
are asking for a spoon feeding). And God help them if they make a
typographical error or grammatical error.

I did not ask someone to build a webpage or a website for me. I asked
for a code sample that was to be a small part of the overall picture.
Are you saying that is wrong and lazy?

When I was a child, I was taken care of. But my parents are gone now,
and

I
find myself without a care-giver. I have to stand on my own, as do we
all

at
one time or another. My mother taught me how to do that, and I will
always be grateful to her. She knew she wouldn't be there to take
care of me forever. In other words, who parents the parents? The best
a parent can do for their offspring is to teach them to fend for
themselves. And I want to be a good "parent," now that I am one.


Your lecture on hard work, discipline, and home training were again
presumptuous and unnecessary, except for the children who sprung forth
from your loins. But maybe they are just as perfect as you, and need
no such lectures.

I didn't call you out by name for help.

If such a request was beneath you, the tasteful thing for you have do
was to quietly
ignore it.

Really, Kevin, who do you think you are? Do you think that you are
above reproach? If so, had you run a simple MS Word spell check, or
better yet, remembered your elementary school grammar, you could have
avoided the misuse of commas at least one of your sentences. No, I
don't tend to pick on the misuse of spelling or grammar by others, but
given that you listed it as one of your pet peeves, I would have
thought that you were above it all. Obviously, you are not.

--
HTH,

This should have been HRH (His Royal Highness), which would go along
very nicely with your Princess.

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
Sometimes you eat the elephant.
Sometimes the elephant eats you.

"Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:xR*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
> Kevin,
>
> I really didn't want to take what you said the wrong way, so I did
> a search
> on your name relative to your other posts within this newsgroup.
> It

seems
> that you have some pet peeves, including people asking for sample
> code.
>
> I fully respect your right not to aid or assist someone who is
> asking

for
> help.
>
> It is not unusual for highly experienced programmers to purchase
> books

or
> seek advice on programming in a language that is new to them.
> Everyone does
> not feel the need to reinvent the wheel, especially if the wheel is
> something that is used as a utility of sorts. Most of the time,
> that piece
> of code is a small part of the overall code base but may be a
> necessary piece of the puzzle.
>
> Am I misunderstanding the spirit of your posts and your reply? Do
> you think
> that one should reinvent everything themselves? Do you think that

there
> is
> shame in seeking a code example for something specific that they
> want to do,
> especially when that specific something is done over and over and
> is

used
> by
> many people?
>
>
> "Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
> news:#7**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> Here's a Freebie:
>>
>> ' Conditional, depends on Knowledge
>> If (IsNothing(Me.Knowledge))
>> Me.ShareKnowledge = False
>> Else
>> Me.ShareKnowledge = True
>> End If
>>
>> ' Non-Conditional
>> Me.NeedCode = False
>> Me.Educate()
>>
>> --
>> HTH,
>>
>> Kevin Spencer
>> Microsoft MVP
>> .Net Developer
>> Sometimes you eat the elephant.
>> Sometimes the elephant eats you.
>>
>>
>> "Swaregirl" <sw*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:dL*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
>> > Hello,
>> >
>> > I would like to build a website using ASP.NET. I would like
>> > website visitors to be able to download code that I would like
>> > to make available
>> > to
>> > them and that would be residing on my personal server.
>> >
>> > Are there any code samples or books that someone can recommend
>> > so

that
>> > I
>> > can
>> > implement this. I would prefer VB.NET code, but I am willing to
>> > convert
>> > from C# if necessary.
>> >
>> > Thanks
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>



Nov 19 '05 #20

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.