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What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout?

P: n/a
dee
Hi,

What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can specify
in web.config?
Thanks.
Dee
Nov 19 '05 #1
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15 Replies


P: n/a
If I remember correctly its 365 days, which would be 525,600 minutes.....

Regards

John Timney
ASP.NET MVP
Microsoft Regional Director

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:uE**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Hi,

What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can
specify in web.config?
Thanks.
Dee

Nov 19 '05 #2

P: n/a
It's a very dangerous question to ask, however. Upping the Session Timeout
is going to incur more memory usage on the server, as it propagates to all
user Sessions.Usually this question is asked because the developer is
planning on solving a problem in a way that could otherwise be solved using
a less machiavellian approach. In the long run, the developer has a much
greater problem on his/her hands, which is "where has all my memory gone,
and how do I reduce memory usage in my app?"

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
news:ul**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
If I remember correctly its 365 days, which would be 525,600 minutes.....

Regards

John Timney
ASP.NET MVP
Microsoft Regional Director

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:uE**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Hi,

What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can
specify in web.config?
Thanks.
Dee


Nov 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
I completely agree with your extra comments Kevin.

--
Regards

John Timney
ASP.NET MVP
Microsoft Regional Director

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:uA**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
It's a very dangerous question to ask, however. Upping the Session Timeout
is going to incur more memory usage on the server, as it propagates to all
user Sessions.Usually this question is asked because the developer is
planning on solving a problem in a way that could otherwise be solved
using a less machiavellian approach. In the long run, the developer has a
much greater problem on his/her hands, which is "where has all my memory
gone, and how do I reduce memory usage in my app?"

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
news:ul**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
If I remember correctly its 365 days, which would be 525,600 minutes.....

Regards

John Timney
ASP.NET MVP
Microsoft Regional Director

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:uE**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Hi,

What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can
specify in web.config?
Thanks.
Dee



Nov 19 '05 #4

P: n/a
dee
Thanks everyone.

"John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
I completely agree with your extra comments Kevin.

--
Regards

John Timney
ASP.NET MVP
Microsoft Regional Director

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:uA**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
It's a very dangerous question to ask, however. Upping the Session
Timeout is going to incur more memory usage on the server, as it
propagates to all user Sessions.Usually this question is asked because
the developer is planning on solving a problem in a way that could
otherwise be solved using a less machiavellian approach. In the long run,
the developer has a much greater problem on his/her hands, which is
"where has all my memory gone, and how do I reduce memory usage in my
app?"

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
news:ul**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
If I remember correctly its 365 days, which would be 525,600
minutes.....

Regards

John Timney
ASP.NET MVP
Microsoft Regional Director

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:uE**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Hi,

What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can
specify in web.config?
Thanks.
Dee



Nov 19 '05 #5

P: n/a
And, leap years don't count ... ;-)

The max session timeout in minutes *is* 525,600.

It's easy to check. Just set the timeout to 525601.

The error code will read :
"For InProc and StateServer modes,
the session timeout value cannot be larger than one year."

This makes me wonder if with SQL Server SessionState
the timeout could be set to larger than one year, although
I can't think of a single reason to set it that high.


Juan T. Llibre
ASP.NET MVP
http://asp.net.do/foros/
Foros de ASP.NET en Español
Ven, y hablemos de ASP.NET...
======================

"John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
news:ul**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
If I remember correctly its 365 days, which would be 525,600 minutes.....

Regards

John Timney
ASP.NET MVP
Microsoft Regional Director

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message news:uE**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Hi,

What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can specify in
web.config?
Thanks.
Dee


Nov 19 '05 #6

P: n/a
dee
Kevin,
Here is why I asked that Q.
I save a DataTable in a Sessiopn variable and use it across my pages. There
is no login required to access the pages. However, I need to think of how
long to let the user have access to the pages before having to ask him to
redo his search. This isn't very nice since there is no login. But the
decision to use Session was made because of speed. I still dont have a
convinicing solution.
Dee

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:uA**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
It's a very dangerous question to ask, however. Upping the Session Timeout
is going to incur more memory usage on the server, as it propagates to all
user Sessions.Usually this question is asked because the developer is
planning on solving a problem in a way that could otherwise be solved
using a less machiavellian approach. In the long run, the developer has a
much greater problem on his/her hands, which is "where has all my memory
gone, and how do I reduce memory usage in my app?"

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
news:ul**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
If I remember correctly its 365 days, which would be 525,600 minutes.....

Regards

John Timney
ASP.NET MVP
Microsoft Regional Director

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:uE**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Hi,

What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can
specify in web.config?
Thanks.
Dee



Nov 19 '05 #7

P: n/a
Thanks for the additional info, Dee. One solution would be to use a
client-side mechanism to refresh the page periodically, so that the Session
doesn't time out as long as the user is on that page. This could be done
with a META Refresh tag, or using JavaScript's setTimeout() function, if you
need more control over how the page is "refreshed."

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Kevin,
Here is why I asked that Q.
I save a DataTable in a Sessiopn variable and use it across my pages.
There is no login required to access the pages. However, I need to think
of how long to let the user have access to the pages before having to ask
him to redo his search. This isn't very nice since there is no login. But
the decision to use Session was made because of speed. I still dont have a
convinicing solution.
Dee

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:uA**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
It's a very dangerous question to ask, however. Upping the Session
Timeout is going to incur more memory usage on the server, as it
propagates to all user Sessions.Usually this question is asked because
the developer is planning on solving a problem in a way that could
otherwise be solved using a less machiavellian approach. In the long run,
the developer has a much greater problem on his/her hands, which is
"where has all my memory gone, and how do I reduce memory usage in my
app?"

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
news:ul**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
If I remember correctly its 365 days, which would be 525,600
minutes.....

Regards

John Timney
ASP.NET MVP
Microsoft Regional Director

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:uE**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Hi,

What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can
specify in web.config?
Thanks.
Dee



Nov 19 '05 #8

P: n/a
dee
Thanks Kevin,
That sounds like a much better solution than to ask the user to redo his
search becuase of a timeout. People assciate, righty, timeouts for logins
and security reasons.
Good luck.
Dee

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Thanks for the additional info, Dee. One solution would be to use a
client-side mechanism to refresh the page periodically, so that the
Session doesn't time out as long as the user is on that page. This could
be done with a META Refresh tag, or using JavaScript's setTimeout()
function, if you need more control over how the page is "refreshed."

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Kevin,
Here is why I asked that Q.
I save a DataTable in a Sessiopn variable and use it across my pages.
There is no login required to access the pages. However, I need to think
of how long to let the user have access to the pages before having to ask
him to redo his search. This isn't very nice since there is no login. But
the decision to use Session was made because of speed. I still dont have
a convinicing solution.
Dee

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:uA**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
It's a very dangerous question to ask, however. Upping the Session
Timeout is going to incur more memory usage on the server, as it
propagates to all user Sessions.Usually this question is asked because
the developer is planning on solving a problem in a way that could
otherwise be solved using a less machiavellian approach. In the long
run, the developer has a much greater problem on his/her hands, which is
"where has all my memory gone, and how do I reduce memory usage in my
app?"

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
news:ul**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
If I remember correctly its 365 days, which would be 525,600
minutes.....

Regards

John Timney
ASP.NET MVP
Microsoft Regional Director

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:uE**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Hi,
>
> What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can
> specify in web.config?
> Thanks.
> Dee
>



Nov 19 '05 #9

P: n/a
Dee,

Reed this too

http://www.codeproject.com/aspnet/Reconnect.asp

--
Regards

John Timney
ASP.NET MVP
Microsoft Regional Director

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:uE*************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Thanks Kevin,
That sounds like a much better solution than to ask the user to redo his
search becuase of a timeout. People assciate, righty, timeouts for logins
and security reasons.
Good luck.
Dee

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Thanks for the additional info, Dee. One solution would be to use a
client-side mechanism to refresh the page periodically, so that the
Session doesn't time out as long as the user is on that page. This could
be done with a META Refresh tag, or using JavaScript's setTimeout()
function, if you need more control over how the page is "refreshed."

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Kevin,
Here is why I asked that Q.
I save a DataTable in a Sessiopn variable and use it across my pages.
There is no login required to access the pages. However, I need to think
of how long to let the user have access to the pages before having to
ask him to redo his search. This isn't very nice since there is no
login. But the decision to use Session was made because of speed. I
still dont have a convinicing solution.
Dee

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:uA**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
It's a very dangerous question to ask, however. Upping the Session
Timeout is going to incur more memory usage on the server, as it
propagates to all user Sessions.Usually this question is asked because
the developer is planning on solving a problem in a way that could
otherwise be solved using a less machiavellian approach. In the long
run, the developer has a much greater problem on his/her hands, which
is "where has all my memory gone, and how do I reduce memory usage in
my app?"

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
news:ul**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> If I remember correctly its 365 days, which would be 525,600
> minutes.....
>
> Regards
>
> John Timney
> ASP.NET MVP
> Microsoft Regional Director
>
> "dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
> news:uE**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> Hi,
>>
>> What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can
>> specify in web.config?
>> Thanks.
>> Dee
>>
>
>



Nov 19 '05 #10

P: n/a
dee
Kevin,
I have a DataGrid on my WebForm. The Meta Refresh works fine if I have not
clicked on a any row of the gird. My page shows the details of the record
that is selected in the grid. In that state the Refresh doesnt do anything.
Any suggestions as to why?
Thanks.

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Thanks for the additional info, Dee. One solution would be to use a
client-side mechanism to refresh the page periodically, so that the
Session doesn't time out as long as the user is on that page. This could
be done with a META Refresh tag, or using JavaScript's setTimeout()
function, if you need more control over how the page is "refreshed."

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Kevin,
Here is why I asked that Q.
I save a DataTable in a Sessiopn variable and use it across my pages.
There is no login required to access the pages. However, I need to think
of how long to let the user have access to the pages before having to ask
him to redo his search. This isn't very nice since there is no login. But
the decision to use Session was made because of speed. I still dont have
a convinicing solution.
Dee

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:uA**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
It's a very dangerous question to ask, however. Upping the Session
Timeout is going to incur more memory usage on the server, as it
propagates to all user Sessions.Usually this question is asked because
the developer is planning on solving a problem in a way that could
otherwise be solved using a less machiavellian approach. In the long
run, the developer has a much greater problem on his/her hands, which is
"where has all my memory gone, and how do I reduce memory usage in my
app?"

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
news:ul**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
If I remember correctly its 365 days, which would be 525,600
minutes.....

Regards

John Timney
ASP.NET MVP
Microsoft Regional Director

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:uE**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Hi,
>
> What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can
> specify in web.config?
> Thanks.
> Dee
>



Nov 19 '05 #11

P: n/a
dee
Good article John,
Thanks.

"John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
news:Op***************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Dee,

Reed this too

http://www.codeproject.com/aspnet/Reconnect.asp

--
Regards

John Timney
ASP.NET MVP
Microsoft Regional Director

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:uE*************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Thanks Kevin,
That sounds like a much better solution than to ask the user to redo his
search becuase of a timeout. People assciate, righty, timeouts for logins
and security reasons.
Good luck.
Dee

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Thanks for the additional info, Dee. One solution would be to use a
client-side mechanism to refresh the page periodically, so that the
Session doesn't time out as long as the user is on that page. This could
be done with a META Refresh tag, or using JavaScript's setTimeout()
function, if you need more control over how the page is "refreshed."

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Kevin,
Here is why I asked that Q.
I save a DataTable in a Sessiopn variable and use it across my pages.
There is no login required to access the pages. However, I need to
think of how long to let the user have access to the pages before
having to ask him to redo his search. This isn't very nice since there
is no login. But the decision to use Session was made because of speed.
I still dont have a convinicing solution.
Dee

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:uA**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> It's a very dangerous question to ask, however. Upping the Session
> Timeout is going to incur more memory usage on the server, as it
> propagates to all user Sessions.Usually this question is asked because
> the developer is planning on solving a problem in a way that could
> otherwise be solved using a less machiavellian approach. In the long
> run, the developer has a much greater problem on his/her hands, which
> is "where has all my memory gone, and how do I reduce memory usage in
> my app?"
>
> --
> HTH,
>
> Kevin Spencer
> Microsoft MVP
> .Net Developer
> What You Seek Is What You Get.
>
> "John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
> news:ul**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> If I remember correctly its 365 days, which would be 525,600
>> minutes.....
>>
>> Regards
>>
>> John Timney
>> ASP.NET MVP
>> Microsoft Regional Director
>>
>> "dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
>> news:uE**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can
>>> specify in web.config?
>>> Thanks.
>>> Dee
>>>
>>
>>
>
>



Nov 19 '05 #12

P: n/a
Hi dee,

Do you have a URL to look at? The META Refresh tag should always work. Of
course, if it is a WebForm, you may have an issue with PostBack, in which
case your best bet would be to use JavaScript.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:eo**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Kevin,
I have a DataGrid on my WebForm. The Meta Refresh works fine if I have not
clicked on a any row of the gird. My page shows the details of the record
that is selected in the grid. In that state the Refresh doesnt do
anything. Any suggestions as to why?
Thanks.

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Thanks for the additional info, Dee. One solution would be to use a
client-side mechanism to refresh the page periodically, so that the
Session doesn't time out as long as the user is on that page. This could
be done with a META Refresh tag, or using JavaScript's setTimeout()
function, if you need more control over how the page is "refreshed."

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Kevin,
Here is why I asked that Q.
I save a DataTable in a Sessiopn variable and use it across my pages.
There is no login required to access the pages. However, I need to think
of how long to let the user have access to the pages before having to
ask him to redo his search. This isn't very nice since there is no
login. But the decision to use Session was made because of speed. I
still dont have a convinicing solution.
Dee

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:uA**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
It's a very dangerous question to ask, however. Upping the Session
Timeout is going to incur more memory usage on the server, as it
propagates to all user Sessions.Usually this question is asked because
the developer is planning on solving a problem in a way that could
otherwise be solved using a less machiavellian approach. In the long
run, the developer has a much greater problem on his/her hands, which
is "where has all my memory gone, and how do I reduce memory usage in
my app?"

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
news:ul**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> If I remember correctly its 365 days, which would be 525,600
> minutes.....
>
> Regards
>
> John Timney
> ASP.NET MVP
> Microsoft Regional Director
>
> "dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
> news:uE**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> Hi,
>>
>> What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can
>> specify in web.config?
>> Thanks.
>> Dee
>>
>
>



Nov 19 '05 #13

P: n/a
dee
I have the following:
<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="1200">
in my Table.aspx.
If there is nothing selected on the grid inside this page then I see the
screen flash as it refreshed. However, when a row is selected and hence thte
page is showing additional dynamic informaiton the refresh doesn take place
at all.
"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:OY**************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
Hi dee,

Do you have a URL to look at? The META Refresh tag should always work. Of
course, if it is a WebForm, you may have an issue with PostBack, in which
case your best bet would be to use JavaScript.

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:eo**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Kevin,
I have a DataGrid on my WebForm. The Meta Refresh works fine if I have
not clicked on a any row of the gird. My page shows the details of the
record that is selected in the grid. In that state the Refresh doesnt do
anything. Any suggestions as to why?
Thanks.

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Thanks for the additional info, Dee. One solution would be to use a
client-side mechanism to refresh the page periodically, so that the
Session doesn't time out as long as the user is on that page. This could
be done with a META Refresh tag, or using JavaScript's setTimeout()
function, if you need more control over how the page is "refreshed."

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
.Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Kevin,
Here is why I asked that Q.
I save a DataTable in a Sessiopn variable and use it across my pages.
There is no login required to access the pages. However, I need to
think of how long to let the user have access to the pages before
having to ask him to redo his search. This isn't very nice since there
is no login. But the decision to use Session was made because of speed.
I still dont have a convinicing solution.
Dee

"Kevin Spencer" <ke***@DIESPAMMERSDIEtakempis.com> wrote in message
news:uA**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> It's a very dangerous question to ask, however. Upping the Session
> Timeout is going to incur more memory usage on the server, as it
> propagates to all user Sessions.Usually this question is asked because
> the developer is planning on solving a problem in a way that could
> otherwise be solved using a less machiavellian approach. In the long
> run, the developer has a much greater problem on his/her hands, which
> is "where has all my memory gone, and how do I reduce memory usage in
> my app?"
>
> --
> HTH,
>
> Kevin Spencer
> Microsoft MVP
> .Net Developer
> What You Seek Is What You Get.
>
> "John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
> news:ul**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> If I remember correctly its 365 days, which would be 525,600
>> minutes.....
>>
>> Regards
>>
>> John Timney
>> ASP.NET MVP
>> Microsoft Regional Director
>>
>> "dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
>> news:uE**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can
>>> specify in web.config?
>>> Thanks.
>>> Dee
>>>
>>
>>
>
>



Nov 19 '05 #14

P: n/a
Perhaps having a session open for a long period of time is not a good idea, I
don't know there isn't enough quantifiable evidence to support this in either
direction, however saying "You don't want to keep the session open too long
because you are going to run out of memory", although has some merits can be
a onernous statement. Firstly it depends on your application, if you know
your target audience and how they use your website keeping sessions open
longer can be beneficial. Take for example an employee who uses an
application all day long, if you expire the page in 20 minutes, they would
have to log in roughly 5 to 6 times per day on average, based on normal usage
patterns. Even though they use that application all day long they aren't
constantly posting back to the server all day long (checking email, surfing
the web, etc) So an alternative is use javascript to keep the page alive.
This might seem great on the surface however, in essence you still are
keeping the session open for a long period of time (all day), yet you are
increasing the load on the server (postbacks at least every 20 minutes just
to keep the session alive) So you get no net decrease in memory usage yet net
increase in server usage. In my employee example the timeout was simply
changed to 90 minutes and their log in times in an eight hour day was reduced
from 6 to 1. Simply because we monitored usage patterns and behaviour. Also
if you use sqlserver session storage no web server memory is used for
inactive sessions.

Where having a low timeout is beneficial, is when you have many visitors to
the site who use the site very infrequently and stay for 1 or 2 minutes then
leave and never return. Keeping their sessions open longer, could have a
negative effect on server resources. But you would know this and would adjust
timeout to meet the requirements on the users.

"Kevin Spencer" wrote:
It's a very dangerous question to ask, however. Upping the Session Timeout
is going to incur more memory usage on the server, as it propagates to all
user Sessions.Usually this question is asked because the developer is
planning on solving a problem in a way that could otherwise be solved using
a less machiavellian approach. In the long run, the developer has a much
greater problem on his/her hands, which is "where has all my memory gone,
and how do I reduce memory usage in my app?"

--
HTH,

Kevin Spencer
Microsoft MVP
..Net Developer
What You Seek Is What You Get.

"John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
news:ul**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
If I remember correctly its 365 days, which would be 525,600 minutes.....

Regards

John Timney
ASP.NET MVP
Microsoft Regional Director

"dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
news:uE**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Hi,

What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can
specify in web.config?
Thanks.
Dee



Nov 19 '05 #15

P: n/a
See :
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/233477

It's 1440 minutes ( 24 hours ), although setting it to that
amount would run your server to the ground after a few hours.

Holding session values in RAM for 24 hours, if there's
a reasonable amount of traffic to the site, will consume
more RAM than any server could have installed.

Values between 60 and 15 minutes are mostly used.


Juan T. Llibre
ASP.NET MVP
http://asp.net.do/foros/
Foros de ASP.NET en Español
Ven, y hablemos de ASP.NET...
======================
"John Timney (ASP.NET MVP)" <ti*****@despammed.com> wrote in message
news:ul**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> If I remember correctly its 365 days, which would be 525,600 minutes.....
>
> Regards
>
> John Timney
> ASP.NET MVP
> Microsoft Regional Director
>
> "dee" <dee@home> wrote in message
> news:uE**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> Hi,
>>
>> What is the maximum number of minutes for Session timeout that I can
>> specify in web.config?
>> Thanks.
>> Dee

Nov 19 '05 #16

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