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Number of classes in the .NET Framework

P: n/a
I have it in my head that I saw a marketing document from Microsoft with the
total number of classes and methods in the .NET Framework. Something like
70,000 methods? I don't need precise numbers, but a rough estimate of the
number of classes and methods would be useful ....

Thanks in advance.

Mark
Nov 18 '05 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
why?

--
Swanand Mokashi
Microsoft Certified Solution Developer (.NET)
Microsoft Certified Application Developer (.NET)
http://www.swanandmokashi.com/
http://www.swanandmokashi.com/HomePage/WebServices/
Home of the Stock Quotes, Quote of the day and Horoscope web services
"Mark" <fi******@idonotlikejunkmail.umn.edu> wrote in message
news:OY*************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
I have it in my head that I saw a marketing document from Microsoft with the total number of classes and methods in the .NET Framework. Something like
70,000 methods? I don't need precise numbers, but a rough estimate of the
number of classes and methods would be useful ....

Thanks in advance.

Mark

Nov 18 '05 #2

P: n/a
Thanks for your detailed reply. Perhaps .... out of curiosity? While I
don't see the number being included in the next release of trivial pursuit,
the numbers would be intellectually interesting when describing some of the
complexities of the .NET Framework to management or others ...

Do you have the answer?

Mark

"Swanand Mokashi" <swanandATswanandmokashiDOTcomNOSPAM> wrote in message
news:Oh*************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
why?

--
Swanand Mokashi
Microsoft Certified Solution Developer (.NET)
Microsoft Certified Application Developer (.NET)
http://www.swanandmokashi.com/
http://www.swanandmokashi.com/HomePage/WebServices/
Home of the Stock Quotes, Quote of the day and Horoscope web services
"Mark" <fi******@idonotlikejunkmail.umn.edu> wrote in message
news:OY*************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
I have it in my head that I saw a marketing document from Microsoft with

the
total number of classes and methods in the .NET Framework. Something like 70,000 methods? I don't need precise numbers, but a rough estimate of the number of classes and methods would be useful ....

Thanks in advance.

Mark


Nov 18 '05 #3

P: n/a
Theres an exanple somewhere on the web (might be in the quickstart) that
demonstrates reflection by cycling through the framework classes. If you
can find it - you should be able to add a line or two to acquire a count of
the classes.

--
Regards

John Timney
Microsoft Regional Director
Microsoft MVP
"Mark" <fi******@idonotlikejunkmail.umn.edu> wrote in message
news:Os**************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
Thanks for your detailed reply. Perhaps .... out of curiosity? While I
don't see the number being included in the next release of trivial pursuit, the numbers would be intellectually interesting when describing some of the complexities of the .NET Framework to management or others ...

Do you have the answer?

Mark

"Swanand Mokashi" <swanandATswanandmokashiDOTcomNOSPAM> wrote in message
news:Oh*************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
why?

--
Swanand Mokashi
Microsoft Certified Solution Developer (.NET)
Microsoft Certified Application Developer (.NET)
http://www.swanandmokashi.com/
http://www.swanandmokashi.com/HomePage/WebServices/
Home of the Stock Quotes, Quote of the day and Horoscope web services
"Mark" <fi******@idonotlikejunkmail.umn.edu> wrote in message
news:OY*************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
I have it in my head that I saw a marketing document from Microsoft
with
the
total number of classes and methods in the .NET Framework. Something

like 70,000 methods? I don't need precise numbers, but a rough estimate of the number of classes and methods would be useful ....

Thanks in advance.

Mark



Nov 18 '05 #4

P: n/a
You could write a fairly trivial program that loaded all the .NET
assemblies, and used reflection to count up the classes and methods. I'm
too busy, or I'd do it myself for the fun of it, but it would be a good
way to introduce yourself to reflection if you've never played with it
before, and in itself would be a good demonstration of the
sophistication of the framework.

-Jason

Mark wrote:
Thanks for your detailed reply. Perhaps .... out of curiosity? While I
don't see the number being included in the next release of trivial pursuit,
the numbers would be intellectually interesting when describing some of the
complexities of the .NET Framework to management or others ...

Do you have the answer?

Mark

"Swanand Mokashi" <swanandATswanandmokashiDOTcomNOSPAM> wrote in message
news:Oh*************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
why?

--
Swanand Mokashi
Microsoft Certified Solution Developer (.NET)
Microsoft Certified Application Developer (.NET)
http://www.swanandmokashi.com/
http://www.swanandmokashi.com/HomePage/WebServices/
Home of the Stock Quotes, Quote of the day and Horoscope web services
"Mark" <fi******@idonotlikejunkmail.umn.edu> wrote in message
news:OY*************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
I have it in my head that I saw a marketing document from Microsoft with


the
total number of classes and methods in the .NET Framework. Something
like
70,000 methods? I don't need precise numbers, but a rough estimate of
the
number of classes and methods would be useful ....

Thanks in advance.

Mark



Nov 18 '05 #5

P: n/a
Great idea. I looked at the quickstart example John refered to in this
thread. I pasted it below. The only problem I'm seeing with reflection is
that you need to know the names of all the dlls. OR, is there a list of
these someplace?

Thanks again.

Mark

"Jason DeFontes" <ja***@defontes.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
You could write a fairly trivial program that loaded all the .NET
assemblies, and used reflection to count up the classes and methods. I'm
too busy, or I'd do it myself for the fun of it, but it would be a good
way to introduce yourself to reflection if you've never played with it
before, and in itself would be a good demonstration of the
sophistication of the framework.

-Jason

Mark wrote:
Thanks for your detailed reply. Perhaps .... out of curiosity? While I
don't see the number being included in the next release of trivial pursuit, the numbers would be intellectually interesting when describing some of the complexities of the .NET Framework to management or others ...

Do you have the answer?

Mark

"Swanand Mokashi" <swanandATswanandmokashiDOTcomNOSPAM> wrote in message
news:Oh*************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
why?

--
Swanand Mokashi
Microsoft Certified Solution Developer (.NET)
Microsoft Certified Application Developer (.NET)
http://www.swanandmokashi.com/
http://www.swanandmokashi.com/HomePage/WebServices/
Home of the Stock Quotes, Quote of the day and Horoscope web services
"Mark" <fi******@idonotlikejunkmail.umn.edu> wrote in message
news:OY*************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...

I have it in my head that I saw a marketing document from Microsoft with
the

total number of classes and methods in the .NET Framework. Something


like
70,000 methods? I don't need precise numbers, but a rough estimate of


the
number of classes and methods would be useful ....

Thanks in advance.

Mark


Nov 18 '05 #6

P: n/a
Drat - forgot to indluce the sample code I promised found at
http://samples.gotdotnet.com/quickstart/howto/ (click on reflection on the
left):

// don't forget your using statements
using System;
using System.Reflection;
// ...

// Getting an Assembly, method 1. Get the mscorlib assembly
// Note that other types such as String, or Int32 would have worked just as
well,
// since they reside in the same assembly
Assembly a = typeof(Object).Module.Assembly;

// Getting an Assembly, method 2. Load a particular assembly, using a
reference to a
// module that is within that assembly. Note that this requires a compiled
module for
// the reference, and when running in an aspx page, will require a fully
qualifed path
// to the file, to ensure it is correctly identified
Assembly b = Assembly.LoadFrom ("GetTypes.exe");

// note that either of the above methods is viable, depending on the
information
// you have. Since we know the name of the file which houses all of the base
system
// objects, we could do the following to replace the first example, just as
effectively
// (the absolute path may change on your machine)
// Assembly a = Assembly.LoadFrom
// ("c:/winserv/microsoft.net/framework/v1.0.2230/mscorlib.dll");

"Mark" <fi******@idonotlikejunkmail.umn.edu> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
Great idea. I looked at the quickstart example John refered to in this
thread. I pasted it below. The only problem I'm seeing with reflection is that you need to know the names of all the dlls. OR, is there a list of
these someplace?

Thanks again.

Mark

"Jason DeFontes" <ja***@defontes.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
You could write a fairly trivial program that loaded all the .NET
assemblies, and used reflection to count up the classes and methods. I'm
too busy, or I'd do it myself for the fun of it, but it would be a good
way to introduce yourself to reflection if you've never played with it
before, and in itself would be a good demonstration of the
sophistication of the framework.

-Jason

Mark wrote:
Thanks for your detailed reply. Perhaps .... out of curiosity? While I don't see the number being included in the next release of trivial pursuit, the numbers would be intellectually interesting when describing some of
the
complexities of the .NET Framework to management or others ...

Do you have the answer?

Mark

"Swanand Mokashi" <swanandATswanandmokashiDOTcomNOSPAM> wrote in
message news:Oh*************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...

>why?
>
>--
>Swanand Mokashi
>Microsoft Certified Solution Developer (.NET)
>Microsoft Certified Application Developer (.NET)
>http://www.swanandmokashi.com/
>http://www.swanandmokashi.com/HomePage/WebServices/
>Home of the Stock Quotes, Quote of the day and Horoscope web services
>"Mark" <fi******@idonotlikejunkmail.umn.edu> wrote in message
>news:OY*************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
>
>>I have it in my head that I saw a marketing document from Microsoft

with>
>the
>
>>total number of classes and methods in the .NET Framework. Something

like

>>70,000 methods? I don't need precise numbers, but a rough estimate of
the

>>number of classes and methods would be useful ....
>>
>>Thanks in advance.
>>
>>Mark
>>
>>
>
>


Nov 18 '05 #7

P: n/a
Yeah, I was afraid you were going to ask that. You can just figure out
the list manually by using gacutil, or looking at the dlls in the
framework install directory. That's no fun of course, and what you'd
really like to be able to do is get at that programatically, which
appears to be possible, but undocumented, and certainly is progressing a
bit beyond the trivial:

http://support.microsoft.com/default...b;en-us;317540

I found that link here, which is a nice overview of the GAC:

http://www.codeproject.com/dotnet/DemystifyGAC.asp

-Jason

Mark wrote:
Great idea. I looked at the quickstart example John refered to in this
thread. I pasted it below. The only problem I'm seeing with reflection is
that you need to know the names of all the dlls. OR, is there a list of
these someplace?

Thanks again.

Mark

"Jason DeFontes" <ja***@defontes.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
You could write a fairly trivial program that loaded all the .NET
assemblies, and used reflection to count up the classes and methods. I'm
too busy, or I'd do it myself for the fun of it, but it would be a good
way to introduce yourself to reflection if you've never played with it
before, and in itself would be a good demonstration of the
sophistication of the framework.

-Jason

Mark wrote:

Thanks for your detailed reply. Perhaps .... out of curiosity? While I
don't see the number being included in the next release of trivial
pursuit,
the numbers would be intellectually interesting when describing some of
the
complexities of the .NET Framework to management or others ...

Do you have the answer?

Mark

"Swanand Mokashi" <swanandATswanandmokashiDOTcomNOSPAM> wrote in message
news:Oh*************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
why?

--
Swanand Mokashi
Microsoft Certified Solution Developer (.NET)
Microsoft Certified Application Developer (.NET)
http://www.swanandmokashi.com/
http://www.swanandmokashi.com/HomePage/WebServices/
Home of the Stock Quotes, Quote of the day and Horoscope web services
"Mark" <fi******@idonotlikejunkmail.umn.edu> wrote in message
news:OY*************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
>I have it in my head that I saw a marketing document from Microsoft
with
the
>total number of classes and methods in the .NET Framework. Something

like
>70,000 methods? I don't need precise numbers, but a rough estimate of

the
>number of classes and methods would be useful ....
>
>Thanks in advance.
>
>Mark
>
>


Nov 18 '05 #8

P: n/a
Cool - I went through all the System namespaces and found:

Class count: 4760
Method count: 119656

The code is below. Anything I'm messing up here? Thanks again.

//***** To run this code, throw it in the button click event on a WinForm
and put a textbox on the form titled "txtOutput" *****

int intClassCount = 0;
int intMethodCount = 0;
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

string[] Ass = new string[21];
Ass[0] = "System.Configuration.Install.dll";
Ass[1] = "System.Data.dll";
Ass[2] = "System.Data.OracleClient.dll";
Ass[3] = "System.Design.dll";
Ass[4] = "System.DirectoryServices.dll";
Ass[5] = "System.dll";
Ass[6] = "System.Drawing.Design.dll";
Ass[7] = "System.EnterpriseServices.dll";
//System.EnterpriseServices.Thunk.dll
//Ass[8] = "System.EnterpriseServices.Thunk.dll"; //It coudn't find this
one.
Ass[8] = string.Empty;
Ass[9] = "System.Management.dll";
Ass[10] = "System.Messaging.dll";
Ass[11] = "System.Runtime.Remoting.dll";
Ass[12] = "System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Soap.dll" ;
Ass[13] = "System.Security.dll";
Ass[14] = "System.ServiceProcess.dll";
Ass[15] = "System.Web.dll";
Ass[16] = "System.Web.Mobile.dll";
Ass[17] = "System.Web.RegularExpressions.dll";
Ass[18] = "System.Web.Services.dll";
Ass[19] = "System.Windows.Forms.dll";
Ass[20] = "System.XML.dll";
for(int intAssemblyCount = 0; intAssemblyCount < Ass.Length;
intAssemblyCount ++)
{
if (Ass[intAssemblyCount] != string.Empty)
{
Assembly a = Assembly.LoadFrom
(@"C:\WINNT\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v1.1.4322\" +
Ass[intAssemblyCount]);

//int intPropertyCount = 0;

Module[] mod = a.GetModules();
sb.Append(Environment.NewLine +"Assembly FullName: " + a.FullName);

for (int i = 0; i < mod.Length; i++)
{
Module m = mod[i];
sb.Append(Environment.NewLine + "FullyQualifiedName: " +
m.FullyQualifiedName);
sb.Append(Environment.NewLine + "Name: " + m.Name);
}

Type [] types = a.GetTypes ();
foreach (Type t in types)
{
if ( t.IsClass)
{
intClassCount++;
sb.Append(Environment.NewLine + "Class.Name: " + t.Name);

MethodInfo[] methods = t.GetMethods();

for (int i = 0; i < methods.Length; i++)
{
MethodInfo mi = methods[i];
//sb.Append(Environment.NewLine + " Method Name: " + mi.Name);
intMethodCount++;
}
}
}
}
}

sb.Append(Environment.NewLine + "Class count: " +
intClassCount.ToString());
sb.Append(Environment.NewLine + "Method count: " +
intMethodCount.ToString());

txtOutput.Text = sb.ToString();


"Jason DeFontes" <ja***@defontes.com> wrote in message
news:uh*************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
Yeah, I was afraid you were going to ask that. You can just figure out
the list manually by using gacutil, or looking at the dlls in the
framework install directory. That's no fun of course, and what you'd
really like to be able to do is get at that programatically, which
appears to be possible, but undocumented, and certainly is progressing a
bit beyond the trivial:

http://support.microsoft.com/default...b;en-us;317540

I found that link here, which is a nice overview of the GAC:

http://www.codeproject.com/dotnet/DemystifyGAC.asp

-Jason

Mark wrote:
Great idea. I looked at the quickstart example John refered to in this
thread. I pasted it below. The only problem I'm seeing with reflection is that you need to know the names of all the dlls. OR, is there a list of
these someplace?

Thanks again.

Mark

"Jason DeFontes" <ja***@defontes.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
You could write a fairly trivial program that loaded all the .NET
assemblies, and used reflection to count up the classes and methods. I'm
too busy, or I'd do it myself for the fun of it, but it would be a good
way to introduce yourself to reflection if you've never played with it
before, and in itself would be a good demonstration of the
sophistication of the framework.

-Jason

Mark wrote:
Thanks for your detailed reply. Perhaps .... out of curiosity? While Idon't see the number being included in the next release of trivial


pursuit,
the numbers would be intellectually interesting when describing some of


the
complexities of the .NET Framework to management or others ...

Do you have the answer?

Mark

"Swanand Mokashi" <swanandATswanandmokashiDOTcomNOSPAM> wrote in messagenews:Oh*************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>why?
>
>--
>Swanand Mokashi
>Microsoft Certified Solution Developer (.NET)
>Microsoft Certified Application Developer (.NET)
>http://www.swanandmokashi.com/
>http://www.swanandmokashi.com/HomePage/WebServices/
>Home of the Stock Quotes, Quote of the day and Horoscope web services
>"Mark" <fi******@idonotlikejunkmail.umn.edu> wrote in message
>news:OY*************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
>
>
>>I have it in my head that I saw a marketing document from Microsoft


with
>the
>
>
>>total number of classes and methods in the .NET Framework. Something

like
>>70,000 methods? I don't need precise numbers, but a rough estimate of
the
>>number of classes and methods would be useful ....
>>
>>Thanks in advance.
>>
>>Mark
>>
>>
>
>


Nov 18 '05 #9

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.